Slide #1.

Origami
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Slide #2.

Why origami • Electric Origami - Just as a magician appears to create objects out of “thin air,” students will create three dimensional structures from two dimensional materials and then bring them to life to with digital electronics. • Creativity and formalism, the combination of which allows us to both build on the work of others and share our contributions. – Folding instructions – 3D drawings – Electrical schematics
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Slide #3.

Origami Formalism • Folding diagrams
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Slide #4.

Origami Formalism • Folding patterns Robert Lang uses a computer program called TreeMaker to design his creations and a laser cutter to gently score the paper for quicker & easier folding.
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Slide #5.

A little origami history • Origami: "Ori" is the Japanese word for folding and "kami" is the Japanese word for paper. • It began in China in the first or second century – Japan in the sixth century • For centuries there were no written directions for folding origami • In 1797, How to Fold 1000 Cranes was published the first written set of origami instructions for folding a crane
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Slide #6.

More Recent Origami • For centuries, origami patterns had at most thirty steps; now they can have hundreds • Complex origami is also more practical • Folding techniques applied to many things – medical, electrical, optical, or nanotechnical devices, strands of DNA – Applications with fixed size and shape but needing to be packed tightly and in an orderly way • Mitsubishi commercial • David Hart
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Slide #7.

Getting started • Make a crane – Interactive instructions – YouTube – Folding diagram on the next slide – Crease pattern:
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Slide #9.

The bird base
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Slide #10.

Folding diagram Symbols
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Slide #11.

Something new
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Slide #12.

Something modular • Simple Origami Cube
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