Slide #1.

Moving callers from Reporters to Actors “It is a dangerous position to be in when you can't see, can't hear and won't listen...” ― Stella Payton
More slides like this


Slide #2.

Laypersons may not have confidence
More slides like this


Slide #3.

Confidence Predicts Action
More slides like this


Slide #4.

How do we gain confidence? Education Practice Experience Encouragement
More slides like this


Slide #5.

How do we gain confidence? Education Practice Experience Encouragement Dispatchers engage and direct……they do not ask?
More slides like this


Slide #6.

Challenges of Early CPR Cardiac arrest is hard to recognize Laypersons may not have confidence CPR can be technically difficult
More slides like this


Slide #7.

The average time required to open the airway and provide 2 breaths for bystanders during the first cycle is…..? A.10 seconds B. 20 seconds C. 30 seconds D. 60 seconds Initial airway management
More slides like this


Slide #8.

The average time required to open the airway and provide 2 breaths for bystanders during the first cycle is…..? A.10 seconds B. 20 seconds C. 30 seconds D. 60 seconds Initial airway management
More slides like this


Slide #9.

During subsequent cycles of CPR by the bystander, ventilations interrupt chest compressions …..? A. 5 seconds B. 10 seconds C. 15 seconds D. 20 seconds Subsequent CPR cycles
More slides like this


Slide #10.

During subsequent cycles of CPR by the bystander, ventilations interrupt chest compressions …..? A. 5 seconds B. 10 seconds C. 15 seconds D. 20 seconds Subsequent CPR cycles
More slides like this


Slide #11.

Keep It Simple Hands Only CPR Eliminate ventilations Focus on chest compressions
More slides like this


Slide #12.

Keep It Simple Survival 15% Hands Only 10% Rescue Breathing + Chest Compressions
More slides like this


Slide #13.

Don’t Ask Tell • Active listening: the first few seconds • Callers often volunteer critical information • Be calm; be assertive • Goal: start CPR as early as possible
More slides like this


Slide #14.

Barriers to Bystander CPR • Panic • Squeamish about mouth-to-mouth CPR • Fear of legal ramifications • Can’t get person to the floor • Fear of causing harm
More slides like this


Slide #15.

Panic • Most frequent reason for CPR nonprovision • High stress and panicked situations can lead to breakdown in communication between dispatcher and bystander
More slides like this


Slide #16.

Tactic: Confident Assertiveness • Assertiveness is key • Dispatcher’s confidence becomes the bystander’s confidence when coached assertively • 75% of recently-trained bystanders stated that instructions from a dispatcher make it easier to perform CPR
More slides like this


Slide #17.

Squeamish about Mouth-to-Mouth CPR • Without clear verbal specification of chest-only compression CPR, bystanders may assume they must perform mouth-to-mouth when a dispatcher says “CPR”
More slides like this


Slide #18.

Tactic: Compression-Only CPR • Utilize key phrases: • “No Mouth-to-Mouth” • “No Breaths” • “Only chest compressions” • Tell the bystander that the patient needs chest compressions
More slides like this


Slide #19.

Tactic: Skip it! • We have some protocols with breaths • Children • Pregnant women • Trach/Stoma • Obvious respirator cause (drowning) • If the patient needs breaths and the caller does NOT want to • SKIP IT
More slides like this


Slide #20.

Fear of Causing Harm • “Why should I get involved? I don’t know how to do CPR and if I hurt the patient, I could be sued.” • Must suppress this bystander thought to avoid delays and impeding CPR
More slides like this


Slide #21.

Tactic: Good Samaritan Laws • Inform bystander of their protections from legal ramifications when administering CPR • “You will not hurt them and you will not be sued.” • Frequency of serious injury related to dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR is low and does not outweigh benefits of bystander CPR
More slides like this


Slide #22.

Barrier: Getting Patient on Floor • When there is a barrier to starting CPR, it is frequently due to the caller’s inability to get patient to the floor • Most often: patient needs to be moved from bed to the floor
More slides like this


Slide #23.

Tactic: Emphasize Emergency Situation • Reiterate that no injury to patient is comparable or relevant when facing cardiac arrest • Instruct help of other bystanders • Tell bystander to push, pull, tug, or roll patient onto hard, flat surface • From bed • Bring patient’s legs to floor • Bring patient’s head down
More slides like this


Slide #24.

Barrier: Fear of Causing Harm • Fear of broken ribs, crushing patient, or causing visceral organ damage • Cracking sounds of breaking ribs and tearing cartilage reinforce fear once compressions begin
More slides like this


Slide #25.

Tactic: Justification Minimal risk of major injury 1 : 1000 Vs 9 : 10 Dead
More slides like this


Slide #26.

Questions/ Discussion
More slides like this