Slide #1.

Mainstream Calculus I Enrollments (fall only for 2- & 4-yr colleges & universities) 250 AP Calculus 2005: 240,000 Currently growing at ~13,000/year 200 150 4-yr colleges & universities 2-yr colleges 100 AP Calculus (AB & BC) students (thousands) 50 0 1980–81 1985–86 1990–91 1995–96 academic year 2000–01
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Slide #2.

Mainstream Calculus I Enrollments (fall only for 2- & 4-yr colleges & universities) 250 AP Calculus 2005: 240,000 Currently growing at ~13,000/year 200 150 4-yr colleges & universities 2-yr colleges 100 AP Calculus (AB & BC) students (thousands) Estimated # of students taking Calculus in high school: ~ 500,000 50 0 1980–81 1985–86 1990–91 1995–96 academic year 2000–01 Estimated # of students taking Calculus I in college: ~ 500,000 (includes Business Calc)
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Slide #3.

Bachelors degrees each year* 400,000 SMET + social & behavioral sciences of which 210,000 Science, Math, Engineering of which 100,000 physical, biological, & ag sciences 60,000 engineering 50,000 math, stat, comp sci of which 11,000 mathematics *NSF: among 24-year olds in 2000
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Slide #4.

~160,000 arrive with credit for 400,000 SMET + social & behavioral sciences calculus ~340,000 retake of which calculus taken in 210,000 Science, Math, Engineering HS Bachelors degrees each year* of which ~160,000 will 100,000 physical, biological, & take calculus for ag sciences first time 60,000 engineering 50,000 math, stat, comp sci of which 11,000 mathematics *NSF: among 24-year olds in 2000
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Slide #5.

The Changing Face of Calculus Two-article sequence appeared in Focus in 2004: www.maa.org First-semester calculus has become a high school topic for most of our strongest students. This has several implications: 1.We should ensure that students who take calculus in high school are prepared for the further study of mathematics. 2.We should address the particular needs of those students who arrive in college with credit for calculus. 3.We should recognize that the students who take first-semester calculus in college may need more support and be less likely to continue with further mathematics than those of a generation ago.
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Slide #6.

[email protected] www.macalester.edu/ ~bressoud/talks
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