Slide #1.

Inorganic Carbon
More slides like this


Slide #2.

Inorganic Carbon Pools in Aquatic Systems
More slides like this


Slide #3.

H20 + CO2 <-- --> (H2CO3) <-- --> HCO3-1 + H+ <-- --> CO3-2 + H+ free  CO2     carbonic acid           bicarbonate          carbonate
More slides like this


Slide #4.

Hardness and Alkalinity
More slides like this




Slide #6.

Inorganic Carbon and Buffering
More slides like this






Slide #9.

Low pH Waters
More slides like this


Slide #10.

Travertine and High pH Waters
More slides like this


Slide #11.

DIC in Rivers • Decomposition dominates over photosynthesis, so tend to produce CO2 rather than consuming - Respiration can be so high that CO2 is maintained above equilibrium • Inflowing water high in CO2 from bacterial respiration • High turbulence causes CO2 to be lost quickly, but can see high CO2 in non-turbulent areas and during low flows • Rivers and streams also act to move alkalinity (i.e., HCO3- and CO32-) to lakes or to the ocean
More slides like this


Slide #12.

Inorganic Carbon Flux
More slides like this


Slide #13.

Export of Alkalinity by the Mississippi River
More slides like this


Slide #14.

DIC in headwater streams of different parent rock types (Shin et al. 2011)
More slides like this






Slide #17.

Lake Nyos Before and After an Outgassing Event
More slides like this


Slide #18.

Silent Death
More slides like this




Slide #20.

A Solution
More slides like this


Slide #21.

Standard Curve
More slides like this