Slide #1.

Graded Assignments for All (aka: Universal Design)
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Slide #2.

Not everyone thinks alike Disabilities Learning styles Cultural emphases Historical social inequalities
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Slide #3.

Inclusive Excellence = paradigm shif From different = problem to differences = variety of strengths
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Slide #4.

The Challenge Institutions tend to reproduce themselves What WE do well looks “right”
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Slide #5.

Universal Design for Learning: Present content in multiple ways Multiply how students report their learning Stimulate interest and motivation for learning http://www.advocacyinstitute.org/UDL/CASTfaqs.shtml
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Slide #6.

Let Freedom Ring! Multiple products can serve your goals You NEED NOT grade EVERYTHING You SHOULD NOT grade some things!
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Slide #7.

UDL lets students choose their path Students meet your goals without accommodations whenever possible using their own strengths and interests
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Slide #8.

But! How will I grade?!!!??? Connect goals to grading Use a rubric: reduce focus on form Increase fairness provide useable feedback
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Slide #9.

What’s a rubric? A systematic scoring guide Shared with students Provides both summative and formative feedback
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Slide #10.

1. Identify your goals Enduring Understanding Important to Know and Do Worth Being Familiar With Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding By Design, Expanded 2nd ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005).
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Slide #11.

2. Align assignment with goals Where does this assignment fit? To what does it build? How does it build? What’s negotiable? What isn’t? Define the assignment: topic, process, goals
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Slide #12.

3. What kind of rubric? Holistic : single score, overall impression, vs. Analytic : several dimensions General : criteria generalized across tasks, vs. Task specific: unique to a specific task http://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/assessment/iar/students/report/rubrics-types.php
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Slide #13.

4. Can an existing rubric work? Address the most important aspects? Include anything extraneous? Can you adapt from another field? Can you combine or modify? Is the rubric is clear? Did you test it? http://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/assessment/iar/students/report/rubrics-developmen t.php
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Slide #14.

Does it have needed parts? A scale Criteria for both strengths and errors e.g.: Overall Impact; Work quality/Craftsmanship; Quality of Methods or Content; Sophistication Indicators for each criteria Standards by level
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Slide #15.

5. Should you design your own? Determine the key components Clearly define key components http://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/assessment/iar/students/report/rubr ics-development.php and http://www.utexas.edu/academic/diia/assessment/iar/students/report/rub rics.php Other helpful sites:  http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php - annoyingly pink online-generated rubric development tool. Free! For K-12, but can be edited for more complex learning  http://www.rcampus.com/index.cfm Another free rubric development site – requires log-in.
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Slide #16.

6. What do the levels look like? Describe the highest level first Be clear: e.g., What does “clear” mean? Circle the words that can vary Avoid comparative language Look for concepts instead depth, breadth, quality, accuracy, scope, extent, complexity, degrees
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Slide #17.

7. Develop a scoring scale How many score levels? Define the difference between levels. Ensure the scales are consistent across components.
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Slide #18.

How do the levels vary? Presence to absence Complete to incomplete Many to some to none Major to minor Consistent to inconsistent Always, generally, sometimes, rarely
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Slide #19.

8. Involve students! Their feedback is best for clarity Test your rubric on real products
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