Slide #1.

Acceleration at The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC): Overview of the Accelerated Mathematics Program (AMP) Jesse Kiefner Director, Accelerated Math Program Community College of Baltimore County, Maryland
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Slide #2.

Agenda Nuts and Bolts of AMP Marketing Data Advising Faculty Training Scaling Up Engagement Activities
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Slide #3.

Lingo ALP CCBC AMP
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Slide #4.

ALP versus AMP ALP (ACCELERATED LEARNING PROGRAM) • • • English/reading English/reading acceleration acceleration Developmental students integrated with •credit-level Developmental students students integrated with credit-level students • Partial cohort model AMP (ACCELERATED MATH PROGRAM) • • Math acceleration Math acceleration • • Same setof of students in classes One set students in both • both All students at developmental level classes • • • True cohort model All students at developmental level Full cohort model
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Slide #5.

Connotations of “Acceleration” • • • Fast paced Advanced More work Alternate Labels • • • • • Corequisite model Just-in-time learning Integrated review Blended courses Supplemental instruction
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Slide #6.

Who is CCBC?
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Slide #7.

MAIN CAMPUSES EXTENSION CENTERS
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Slide #11.

Mathematics Department
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Slide #12.

CCBC MATHEMATICS COURSES 081 082 125 Non-Scientific Major Programs AND Business/Liberal Arts Program 153 Statistics Track 125 Non-Scientific Major Programs AND Business/Liberal Arts Program 083 131 Teacher Education Programs 132 135 Radiography and Some Other Technical Programs 153 Statistics Track Engineering/Computer Science Track 163 165 230 251 243 252 257 253 259
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Slide #13.

FACULTY AND STUDENT MAKEUP • Approximately 50 FT Faculty • Approximately 40% FT and 60% PT • Student Enrollment, Spring 2017 MATH 081: Pre-Algebra 814 MATH 082: Introductory Algebra 1,277 MATH 083: Intermediate Algebra 978 MATH 125: Finite Math & Modeling 532 MATH 153: Intro. to Statistical Methods 1208 MATH 163: College Algebra 821
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Slide #14.

PLACEMENT HOW? Placement Placement Test Test Transfer Transfer Credits Credits SAT SAT or or ACT ACT Scores Scores High High School School AP AP Scores Scores (Mathematics) (Mathematics) WHAT TO DO? Take Take placement placement test test on on any any campus campus at at Testing Testing Center. Center. Accuplacer Accuplacer MATH MATH can can be be taken taken twice. twice. Students Students who who wish wish higher higher placement placement must must then then “appeal”. “appeal”. Appeal Appeal is is request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they placed placed into. into. Bring Bring transcript transcript showing showing general general education education math math credits credits from from another another college college or or university university to to CCBC CCBC for for evaluation. evaluation. If If completed completed in in Maryland, Maryland, the the highest highest level level developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. Placement Placement by by SAT SAT MATH MATH score score of of 500 500 or or higher higher (or (or by by ACT ACT MATH MATH score score 21 21 or or higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course (MATH (MATH 111, 111, 125, 125, 131/2/3, 131/2/3, 135, 135, 163). 163). For For higher higher placement, placement, the the student student must must take take Accuplacer MATH. MATH. Accuplacer Students Students with with documentation documentation of of AP AP math math scores scores of of 3, 3, 4, 4, or or 5 5 from from high high school school can can be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart. be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart.
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Slide #15.

Mathematics Acceleration
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Slide #16.

Why is math acceleration needed? Incoming Students Not College-Ready in Mathematics ≈ 70% Success Rates of Traditional Developmental Mathematics Courses ≈ 50% SB 740 – Pathway Must Include Credit Bearing Math and English Within the First 24 Credit Hours of Courses for First Time Degree Seeking Students
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Slide #17.

Meet 100 First-time Students starting in 2010 who placed in MATH 081
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Slide #18.

Relevant Facts Of these 100 students who placed in lowest level of developmental math, Pre-Algebra: 68 are minority 67 are part-time 51 live below the poverty line 52 work
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Slide #19.

Of those 100 math students… Fewer than 10 passed a credit math course… How many graduated?
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Slide #20.

three
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Slide #21.

Math Acceleration Models
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Slide #22.

Triangle Model
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Slide #23.

Compressed Model
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Slide #24.

Studio Model
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Slide #25.

Tutoring Model
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Slide #26.

Technology Model
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Slide #27.

Support Course Model (ALP)
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Slide #28.

Merged Model (AMP)
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Slide #29.

Accelerated Mathematics Program • Established in Fall 2009 • Students Enroll in 6-Credit “Combo” Classes • Course Topics are Integrated • Combined Course Options: Pre-Algebra & Introductory Algebra Introductory Algebra & Intermediate Algebra Intermediate Algebra & College Algebra Intermediate Algebra & Applied Algebra and Trigonometry
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Slide #30.

CCBC MATHEMATICS COURSE 081 082 125 Non-Scientific Major Programs AND Business/Liberal Arts Program 153 Statistics Track 125 Non-Scientific Major Programs AND Business/Liberal Arts Program 083 131 Teacher Education Programs 132 135 Radiography and Some Other Technical Programs 153 Statistics Track Engineering/Computer Science Track 163 165 230 251 243 252 257 253 259
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Slide #31.

Early Data Analysis
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Slide #32.

MATH 081/082 – Two Year Cohort (Fall 2011) Traditional 081/082 AMP Pass MATH 081 59.2% 74.2% Enroll in MATH 082 48.9% 100.0% Pass MATH 082 30.3% 53.9% Enroll in MATH 083 25.7% 53.9% Pass MATH 083 15.2% 37.1% Enroll in Credit MATH < 5% 37.1% Pass Credit MATH < 5% 27.0%
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Slide #33.

MATH 081/082 – Semester by Semester Traditional MATH 081 Accelerated MATH 081 Traditional MATH 082 Accelerated MATH 082 Fall 2011 48.5% 71.6% 49.5% 58.7% Spring 2012 45.3% 76.5% 50.6% 72.3% Fall 2012 54.4% 74.4% 55.4% 71.8% Spring 2013 52.5% 66.1% 52.7% 73.2% Fall 2013 53.6% 72.3% 50.2% 51.1% Spring 2014 49% 63.3% 51.8% 68.4%
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Slide #34.

MATH 083/163 – Two Year Cohort (Fall 2011) Traditional 083/163 AMP Pass MATH 083 64.5% 81.2% Enroll in Credit 49.6% 100.0% Pass Credit math 39.6% 65.4%
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Slide #35.

MATH 083/135 – Two Year Cohort (Fall 2011) Traditional 083/135 AMP Pass MATH 083 64.5% 80.0% Enroll in Credit 49.6% 100.0% Pass Credit math 39.6% 75.5%
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Slide #36.

African-American Students Traditional Pre-Algebra 43.5% Introductory Algebra 44.7% Intermediate Algebra 42.3% College Algebra 54.1% AMP Path 66.0% 66.7% 50.5% 58.7% 49.6% 79.5%
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Slide #37.

Latest Data Analysis – Students Beginning at the MATH 081 Level
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Slide #43.

10% AWARDS BY STUDENT TYPE % OF STUDENTS WITH EARNED CREDITS 9.3% 100% 8% 80% 70.1% 6% 7.3% 80.5% 79.1% 71.4% 5.5% 60% 4.9% 78.0% 78.0% 71.8% 67.9% 5.1% 4.1% 4% 72.2% 71.8% 4.0% 40% 20% 2% 0.9% 0.3% 0% 0% FALLFALL 20112011 FALL 2012 FALL 2012 FALL 2013 FALL 2013 AMP DEVELOPMENTAL AMP SEQUENTIAL FALL2014 2014 FALL FALL 2015 2015 0.0% FALL
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Slide #46.

Latest Data Analysis – Students Beginning at the MATH 083 Level
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Slide #50.

AWARDS BY STUDENT TYPE 25% 21.6% 20% 19.9% 20.6% 20.6% 19.0% 14.7% 15% 10.7% 10% 8.1% 5% 3.1% 0% FALL 2011 FALL 2012 FALL 2013 AMP SEQUENTIAL FALL 2014 2.2% FALL 2015
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Slide #53.

Scaling Up Semester 081/082 Sections Total 081 Sections Percent of 081 Sections That are 081/082 AMP Fall 2014 5 76 6.58% Spring 2015 6 62 9.68% Fall 2015 14 72 19.44% Spring 2016 10 48 20.83% Fall 2016 14 56 25.00% Spring 2017 12 44 27.27% Semester 083/163 Sections Total 083 Sections Percent of 083 Sections That are 083/163 AMP Fall 2014 7 102 6.86% Spring 2015 9 88 10.23% Fall 2015 15 108 13.89% Spring 2016 14 81 17.28% Fall 2016 12 61 19.67% Spring 2017 8 51 15.69%
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Slide #54.

Building the Program
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Slide #55.

The Goal Lower-Level Course Content Upper-Level Course Content “dovetail strategy”
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Slide #56.

Combined Course Setup Combined courses are 6-credits total. Students cannot drop one course; both courses must be dropped if requesting withdraw. Each student must register for two courses (3 credits each) that are scheduled during consecutive time periods. Topics in each course are integrated. The combined class, both sections, are taught by the same instructor. Students only purchase the higher-level course textbook. No registration blocks! Open to all! Grading is separated along the way and the student receives two grades.
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Slide #57.

Administrative Details Using Existing Courses Scheduling Six Hour Classes Number of Students Per Class Online Registration
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Slide #58.

How Do We Integrate?
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Slide #59.

Combined Course Instruction: Making the Connection Pre-Algebra / Introductory Algebra Introductory Algebra / Intermediate Algebra Intermediate Algebra / College Algebra Intermediate Algebra / Applied Algebra & Trigonometry Lower Level Upper Level Solving Linear Equations Solving Quadratic Equations Evaluating Exponents Scientific Notation Exponent Laws Radicals Graphing Linear Functions Graphing Quadratic Functions Graphing Quadratic Functions Transformations of Quadratic Functions Factoring Determining Zeros of a Function Solving Quadratic Equations Applications of Quadratic Equations Evaluating and Graphing Exponential Functions Modeling Data Using Exponential Functions
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Slide #60.

Assessment in Combined Courses Students receive a final grade for each course. Any student who fails the lower-level course automatically fails the upper-level course. Instructors keep grading separate for each course. Students complete the same comprehensive final exam as students in traditional sections. Students can pass the lower-level course and fail the higher-level course. The same “course rules” are applied.
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Slide #61.

Traditional Class Rules 1 4 Pre-Algebra • 85% Rule • Common Final Exam – 30% 2 College Algebra • 80% Rule • Common Final Exam – 20-30% 5 Introductory Algebra • 85% Rule • Common Final Exam – 30% 3 Intermediate Algebra • 85% Rule • Common Final Exam – 30% Applied Algebra & Trigonometry • Applied Project Requirement • Comprehensive Final Exam (Instructor Created)
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Slide #62.

Grading in Combined Courses: Semester Tests “All in One” Approach
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Slide #63.

Grading in Combined Courses: Semester Tests “Side by Side” Approach
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Slide #64.

Advantages of Combined Setup Overlap in course content allows for additional time to devote to more challenging topics. Students form a supportive cohort. Students are able to see the connection and relation between two math courses; content doesn’t appear disjoint.
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Slide #65.

Supplementing with OERs
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Slide #66.

How do we make up for missing content? OPEN SOURCE TEXTBOOKS http://www.ccbcmd.edu/Programs-and-Courses/Schools-and-Academic-Departm ents/School-of-Mathematics-and-Science/Mathematics.aspx ORIGINAL TEXTBOOK SOURCES http://www.wallace.ccfaculty.org/ http://www.mathispower4u.com/ ONLINE HOMEWORK (OPTIONAL) www.myopenmath.com or ALEKS (MATH 083/163)
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Slide #67.

Facilitating Student Engagement
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Slide #68.

Managing Extra Time INTERACTIVE LABS (OPTIONAL) • Modeling Tuition Lab • Bottle Water Flow lab • Exponential Decay Lab • Work Together Lab GROUP SESSIONS REVIEW FOR EXAMS
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Slide #69.

Lab 1 • Students model the CCBC tuition billing structure using a linear equation. • The y-intercept and slope are considered in the context of an application. • The linear model is examined graphically. • Students find this lab eye-opening.
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Slide #70.

Lab 2 • Uses a quadratic to model fluid flow from a two-liter bottle of water • Nice break after factoring quadratics • Students should bring in used two-liter bottles • Students love this lab!
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Slide #71.

Lab 3 • Exponential decay problem involving the environmental impact of tropical rainforest destruction. • Students create an exponential model and use it to predict the amount of rainforest remaining in the future. • Students use logarithms to solve exponential equations. • Students don’t exactly love this lab.
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Slide #72.

Lab 4 • Similar to Lab 2, students use a water flow experiment to test the validity of a rational equation that predicts the time required to drain a container. • Difficult logistically because students must fill the container and let water drain three times. • Students love this lab.
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Slide #73.

Marketing
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Slide #74.

Marketing Tools Commercial Brochure Poster Advising Tool
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Slide #75.

Faculty Training Model
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Slide #76.

AMP Instructor Training • • Instructors participate in one training for all AMP courses. Training offered twice per year (January & August). 1 Model: Two Full Days st 2nd Model: Online Modules Blended with One Full Day 3rd Model: One Half Day (Current)
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Slide #79.

Day 1 Discussions Is an AMP class right for you? Twice the time is spent on homework and studying. You cannot withdraw from one class without withdrawing from the other. Attendance is extremely important. Miss one class is equivalent to missing a week. What should you do to be successful in a math course? If you fail one or both classes, you risk losing financial aid. Discussing the financial aid policy is key.
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Slide #80.

Sample: Sharing Student Surveys
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Slide #81.

Future of AMP
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Slide #82.

The Road Ahead Mentorship of Faculty Continued Marketing Combining Introductory Algebra with Statistics and Finite Math
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Slide #83.

www.ampatccbc.org [email protected]
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