Tips For Success Addressing Professors… Know your professor’s name. Know how to contact your professor. Know where your professor’s office is and what his or her office hours are. Ask questions. Be an active participant in class. If you need help outside of class, take advantage of your professor’s office hours. If you cannot go during the published office hours, contact your professor to make an appointment. Read the course syllabus. You can find out office location, office hours, and the appropriate title for your professor in the syllabus. back | home | next
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Not All 20 Point Fonts Are Equal 20  A - Can You Read B - Can You Read C - Can You Read D - Can You Read E - Can You Read F - Can You Read G - Can You Read H - Can You Read I - Can You Read 16  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 14  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 12  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read My Students Tell Me That They Like The Readability Of Ariel Font I never use fonts smaller than 20 point for lecture.
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EAB Campaign #2 GOALS/RESULTS Read my first original starfish message to schedule appointment: 15/22 achieved Those who have read first appointment email schedule an appointment with me within two week after reading: 2/15 achieved The ones who made appointment with me within two weeks after email were successful in coming off probation: 0/2 achieved The ones who made appointment with me within two week after email were successful in avoiding suspension: ½ achieved Read majority of my messages: 19/22 achieved Made an advising appointment with me (12/22) and total that made advising appointment including alternate advisor include additional 3 = 15/22 achieved Those that had advising appointment avoided suspension: 8/15 achieved Made an appointment with me at least by the end of registration week. (11/12 that did make appointment): 11/22 achieved Made an appointment with me at least prior to last day of Withdrawal (5/12 that did make appointment): 5/22 achieved Made an appointment with me at least two week prior to pre-registration week (5/12 that did make appointment): 5/22 achieved 10 Avoided Academic Suspension: 11/22 achieved Back in Good Academic Standing: 6/22 achieved  
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AFL Structure with Exec Director Executive Director Program Director Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Team Captain Participant Participant Program Director Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Participant Participant
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AFL Structure with a Program Director Program Director Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant Team Captain Participant Participant Participant Participant
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Writing Intensive Course Rubric 2=Acceptable 1=Unacceptable Writing assignments are incorporated as an integral, ongoing part of the course, and the writing assignments are effectively integrated, structured, and sequenced in a way that clearly articulates how it helps students improve their writing Writing assignments are not incorporated as an integral component of the course, writing assignments are not structured and sequenced in a way that can help students improve their writing in any clear way From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that students have many opportunities to receive constructive criticism on drafts, and the opportunity to revise their work, particularly drafts of longer projects. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is unclear whether students have many opportunities to receive constructive criticism on drafts, or the opportunity to revise their work, particularly drafts of longer projects. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that assignments and course planning devote ample time for students to reflect on their writing and their intellectual growth. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that assignments and course planning do not devote any time for students to reflect on their writing and their intellectual growth. As stated in the course syllabus, written assignments are a major component of the course grade. The course syllabus clearly and amply explains the writing-intensive nature of the course and contains a detailed schedule for writing assignments and revisions. Written assignments are not a component of the course grade. The course syllabus does not explain the writing-intensive nature of the course and does not contain a schedule for writing assignments and revisions. The Writing Intensive Course has at least one rubric created for grading writing assignments and the rubric is distributed to the students before the writing assignments are due. The Writing Intensive Course has no rubric, and thus no rubric is distributed to the students before the writing assignments are due.
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Using Interview Results To Step 7: Designate persona types Construct Personas Jake Parker (Event Cataloger) Jake is a 23-year-old senior in college and is part of the fraternity Sigma Sigma Lambda. He lives with 16 frat brothers in the frat house, and true to reputation, he parties hard on the weekends. However, he mostly focuses on school work and his geography classes (his major) during the week to try and maintain reasonable grades. His social life revolves around parties, meeting new people as well as enjoying the camaraderie of his frat brothers. He was going out with a girl named Mindy for a while but broke up with her a few months ago. Now he’s playing the field. Jake is less computer savvy than many people his age since learning how to use computers was never a high priority for him. He could always find something he’d rather be doing, and for that matter, he usually had people that could help him, so he knows how to use the basics of the operating system, how to browse the Internet, and how to send email, but not too much more. He uses a computer in the common area of the frat house he doesn’t own one himself. His parents gave Jake a digital camera for his birthday but he doesn’t use it much. Shooting pictures of high-quality isn’t too important to him. He sometimes takes the camera along if he is going on an extended outing such as a ski trip, but mostly he just carries a recent-model camera phone. He’s had his current camera phone for about a month and his previous model for about 6 months. He has saved over 500 pictures from them. He finds himself snapping pictures of his friends in “compromising situations” so that he can give them friendly hassles later on. He always takes a few pictures of the fun times with his buddies when he goes to bars, clubs and to parties. He forgets to download the pictures to the computer until his camera gets full every week or two. Then he muddles through downloading. He likes to get pictures posted to the private area of the server for his frat so he can show how much fun he’s having. Jake rarely looks back on photos that are much more than a month old, but he figures he’ll take his photos with him on a CD when he leaves university so he can remember the good times. Goals: • To post his pictures on the Internet so he can increase camaraderie with his new friends, fraternity brothers and social contacts. • To print his pictures as a source of joking and fun for use with his frat brothers who live in his house. CS 321 • To limit access to certain pictures for viewing only by his fraternity brothers. Lesson Six • To easily find more appropriate photos for very occasional emailing to his more casual friends and family. Personas Page 12
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Sarah Jones (Typical College Day) CS 321 Lesson Six Personas Page 17 It is now the middle of the semester and Sarah is working with her study group for her Psychology class to generate discussion questions for class. During a break in studying, Sarah pulls out her phone, and demonstrates it to Jason by taking a picture of him. She shows him the picture on the phone, but offers to email it to him. During the day and on her way home Sarah takes some additional pictures: a squirrel; a friend with her mouth full at lunch; the Campanile in the rain; people with umbrellas. In all, she ends up taking 11 pictures before she gets home that night. Her pictures automatically upload to PhotoCat and she views the thumbnails when she gets home. By default, PhotoCat sorts the pictures by time so it’s easy for her to find the recent pictures she wants to include. She creates her blog for the day and writes about Jason; she knows her friends in Georgia will be interested to finally see a picture of him since they’ve read about him in her previous blogs. She inserts an image link for each thumbnail she likes from the day into her blog. When she clicks a link near each thumbnail in PhotoCat, it automatically copies the needed HTML code to the clipboard ready for pasting into her blog. Next, Sarah makes sure Jason gets a few pictures in his email. She sees the picture of him that she wants to share towards the top of the thumbnails and she also shares a few of her more artistic pictures. She remembers one picture she took of Alcatraz that she especially liked. She searches for “Alcatraz” and finds a picture from her trip there. It isn’t the exact picture she wants, but she quickly spots the correct one since the thumbnail is only a few lines below. After selecting the pictures to share, she enters Jason’s email address and composes an email to him (on the PhotoCat site) that will notify him of the photoss he can look at online. Now Jason can follow a link automatically included in his email to view the pictures she has shared. She decides to send some pictures to her family while she’s using PhotoCat since she hasn’t been in touch with them for a few days. She selects some recent pictures, enters the email address and sends them a note with a link to the photos from PhotoCat. She doesn’t include the picture of Jason since she’s not sure what they would think of her crush. She isn’t worried, though, since PhotoCat only shares the photos are selects doesn’t allow browsing of other photos unless she intentionally shares them. She finishes up for the day and logs out of PhotoCat.
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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Darla Garcia (First Day of School) A few months ago, Darla enrolled her son, Mario, in a new and exciting half-day program called “Play School”. Play School is a day care program that is designed to help children learn how to play with other kids in a fun and stimulating learning environment. Darla is happy that Mario will have the opportunity to interact with other kids his own age, but is sad because this will be the first time she will be apart from him for more than an hour or two since he was born. Darla and her Husband Carlos have planned to take Mario to his first day of Play School together. They as parents think this will be a memorable moment in their son’s life and do not want to miss out on the experience. The morning arrives; Darla gets up early to make sure everything runs smoothly so Mario will be on time for his first day of Play School. Everything runs without a hitch, she even makes Mario his favorite breakfast of scrambled eggs and ham. As Carlos eats breakfast with Mario, Darla grabs her camera phone “smile boys”. Darla looks at the photo happy that she could capture the moment. After breakfast Darla goes outside and pulls the Volvo out of the cramped garage. She gets the car seat from Carlos’s Taurus and belts in into her car. While Darla is outside, Carlos puts Mario’s coat and shoes on and brings Mario outside. Darla takes the opportunity to take a picture of Carlos and Mario on the front stoop of their house “awhh you put on his red jacket” she says to Carlos. Darla sets her camera phone on the top of the car and starts to put Mario into his car seat, all of a sudden she hears “click” Carlos has snapped a picture of her and Mario. Darla is happy she got into at least one of the pictures, and knows that if it is unbecoming she will just erase it later. The family drives off heading to Berkeley and the Play School site. When the arrive Darla takes a picture of the room as Mario runs off to play. After dropping Mario off at Play School she drops Carlos off at work. When Darla arrives home she decides she wants to look at the pictures and send them off to her mom in New Hampshire. She logs into her PhotoCat account and sees the four pictures taken that morning waiting for her. “Oh that is awful, its one big blur”, CS 321she says when she realizes that Carlos had not held his hand still while taking a picture.Six After deleting the bad picture Darla selects the remaining three pictures and Lesson labels the Personas group as “Mario’s first day at Play School”. She then shares the picture with her mother and Mario’s aunt Juanita. Page 16
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An Ontology level is needed XML Ontology 256 imports Ontologies add • Structure • Constraints • mappings imports XML Ontology 1 XML Ontology 42 = <> We need a way to define ontologies in XML So we can relate them So machines can understand (to some degree) their meaning
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Using Interview Results To Construct Personas Step 6: Expand description of attributes and behaviors Sarah Jones (Distance Communicator) Sarah Jones is a 19-year-old freshman that has moved from Atlanta, Georgia, to attend UC Berkeley. She lives in an apartment with three other freshmen that are some of her main friends on campus. She hasn’t decided what she is going to study but she is leaning towards psychology because she enjoys social interaction—even if she is sometimes a little shy. She bought an inexpensive camera phone with a one-year contract when she first moved to the Bay Area to serve as a way to keep in touch with her friends and family back home. The camera fit in nicely since she didn’t previously own a digital camera and her parents agreed to pay the bills as long as she stayed within the minutes allowed in her service plan. Sarah feels comfortable using technology and knows how to use the Internet and her Windows notebook. She uses the Internet to communicate with her far-away friends—most of whom go to Georgia Tech—by posting pictures and observations of her new surroundings on blogger.com. The Picassa software she uses uploads her blog pictures for her. She spends an hour or two every day posting pictures, writing, and commenting on the blogs of friends. She adds ordinary things to her blog such as pictures of April, her flamboyant roommate. She is also likely to post pictures of things such as the guy she has a crush on but has barely talked to, a blouse she wants to buy, or the strange guy she saw yelling “happy, happy, happy” on campus. Sarah organizes pictures on her computer by date. She sometimes renames pictures if they contain something significant, but she doesn’t do so often or consistently. She uses Picassa to scroll through her pictures by date when she needs to find more “appropriate” pictures to email to her parents and older brother. At this point she has over 1,000 pictures since she takes pictures every day and keeps all of them. Organization is starting to become a problem because of the sheer numbers. Goals: • To take lots of photos throughout the day so she’ll have some that express her current experience and environment. • To review the photos taken most recently so she can upload the ones she likes best to her blog for the day. • To see many recent photos in one place so she can select the most appropriate ones for emailing to her family. CS 321 • To find pictures of her Berkeley friends and scenic pictures for emailing to her family. Lesson Six Personas Page 11
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