Writing Intensive Course Rubric 2=Acceptable 1=Unacceptable Writing assignments are incorporated as an integral, ongoing part of the course, and the writing assignments are effectively integrated, structured, and sequenced in a way that clearly articulates how it helps students improve their writing Writing assignments are not incorporated as an integral component of the course, writing assignments are not structured and sequenced in a way that can help students improve their writing in any clear way From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that students have many opportunities to receive constructive criticism on drafts, and the opportunity to revise their work, particularly drafts of longer projects. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is unclear whether students have many opportunities to receive constructive criticism on drafts, or the opportunity to revise their work, particularly drafts of longer projects. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that assignments and course planning devote ample time for students to reflect on their writing and their intellectual growth. From the course syllabus and course assignments, it is clear that assignments and course planning do not devote any time for students to reflect on their writing and their intellectual growth. As stated in the course syllabus, written assignments are a major component of the course grade. The course syllabus clearly and amply explains the writing-intensive nature of the course and contains a detailed schedule for writing assignments and revisions. Written assignments are not a component of the course grade. The course syllabus does not explain the writing-intensive nature of the course and does not contain a schedule for writing assignments and revisions. The Writing Intensive Course has at least one rubric created for grading writing assignments and the rubric is distributed to the students before the writing assignments are due. The Writing Intensive Course has no rubric, and thus no rubric is distributed to the students before the writing assignments are due.
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2. Health In surance You may already know the scoop with Williams health insurance, but if you don’t, here it is in plain language: Massachusetts requires college students to have some form of health insurance. Williams offers a plan that meets the state’s specifications. If your insurance from home isn’t deemed sufficient or if you don’t have any insurance, you must participate in the College’s insurance plan. The financial aid office provides health insurance grants to the most financially needy students to offset the expense. However, many students don’t realize that the school insurance doesn’t cover dental care and most eye care expenses. After a $10 co-pay for a 30-day supply of a generic drug and a $25 co-pay for a brand name drug, most prescription medicines are covered up to a maximum of $750 for the year. You should be aware of these limitations and perhaps consider them before switching off an old plan. For questions concerning health insurance, call the Health Center at (413) 597- 2206. 3. The Health Center The Health Center provides medical assistance free of charge to Williams students. There is a staff of skilled clinicians, educators, nutritionists, and support personnel to help you with any health concerns. They may also refer you to other medical services. Services received outside the health center are charged for by the clinician, hospital, etc. Health insurance usually covers these services, though not always. Check with the health provider prior to receiving the service. In addition to general health services, the health center offers students psychological services free of charge. Whether you need to speak with a psychiatrist concerning a diagnosed mental disorder or a counselor because you’re stressed, the service is available for free. This is one of the only times in your life that such services will be FREE to you. In fact, most students at Williams take advantage of these resources. So you are definitely not alone in seeking such services when needed. Don’t hesitate to get help. All you need is an appointment to be seen in Psychological Counseling Services. Lastly, if you can’t afford transportation to an appointment, you can go to the Health Center or the Dean’s Office for help. There is a health transportation fund available for students with the highest financial need. And if the problem is urgent, Security can drive you to the hospital.
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SA Strategic Plan reporting example – Counseling Center • The Counseling Center completed a CAS Review and developed a scorecard for implementing recommendations. (1.2) • The Counseling Center partnered with various programs across campus in order to enhance student success. These presentations and program partnerships include but are not limited to: Residence Life; SOAR; Taylor Health and Wellness; Study Away; General Education Program; Student Affairs, and many others. (1.4) • The Counseling Center provided learning opportunities for 4 GAs who apply their counseling and presentation knowledge gained in the classroom to their work in the Counseling Center. (2.1) • The Counseling Center provided a presentation to the Student Affairs Council to demonstrate the learning that occurs by graduate students as they work in the Counseling Center. (2.4) • The Counseling Center staff regularly refer students to many Student Affairs and other University resources. (3.2) • The Counseling Center hired a new counselor who bring a rich experience of diversity. (4.3) • The Counseling Center identified needs for the hiring of a part-time therapist and a full-time therapist, due to increased demands for services, and both positions were filled. (5.1) • The Counseling Center improved the efficiency and effectiveness of serving students and in student file management by implementing Titanium software and by in updating office processes and procedures. (5.3) 4
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Global health educational resources Refugee health resources HealthReach: multilingual and culturally appropriate health information materials for refugees and health providers. Refugee Health Technical Assistance Center: videos about health insurance & refugee basics (resettlement process and cultural profiles) US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants: multilingual health and nutrition information and healthy living toolkit, domestic violence, etc. Health Information Translations: Health information materials translated into multiple languages for immigrant and refugee families Ethnomed: Seattle based organization on cultural profiles and cross cultural health. Minnesota Department of Health: refugee resources, including a health guide for refugee families Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum: See details in “online modules” section below Online courses, modules & videos Global Pediatric Education Consortium: outline of skills, procedures, and patient care knowledge that can be used to create local training materials worldwide, http://www.globalpediatrics.org/ Global Health Media Project videos (for health workers in resource-poor areas): http://globalhealthmedia.org/videos/ BU edX Global Health MOOCs—The Practitioner’s Guide to Global Health: Three multi-disciplinary online preparation courses that are interactive, case-based, evaluative, enable tracking for program directors, and are free of charge. (PI Gabrielle Jacquet) Part 1: The Big Picture (6-12 months in advance) Part 2: Preparation and On the Ground (1 week-3 months in advance) Part 3: Reflection (upon return) Coursera courses: https://www.coursera.org/course/globalhealthintro Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum. Four 1-hour online modules: (1) Global Child Mortality; (2) Undernutrition; (3) Fever in the Returned Child Traveler and (4) Children and Youth New to Canada. Available free by request, http://www.cps.ca/en/curriculum University of Minnesota Global Pediatric Education Series (28 peer-reviewed recorded lectures on Global Child Health, associated with quiz questions & CME): http://www.globalhealth.umn.edu/education/online-global-health-course/ Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) modules & resources: http://www.cugh.org/resources/educational-modules Johns Hopkins School of Public Health open source modules: http://ocw.jhsph.edu/index.cfm/go/find.browse#topics/topicID/11/ SickKids Centre for Global Child Health Public Health Nutrition Course: http://learn.sickkidsglobal.ca/ Stanford International Women’s Rights course: http://www.internationalwomenshealth.org/about.html University of Pittsburgh free modules: http://www.pitt.edu/~super1/lecture/lec40331/001.htm Unite for Sight Global Health University USAID Modules: http://www.globalhealthlearning.org/ UW I-TECH Clinical Education modules: http://edgh.uw.edu/series/clinical-education-modules Refugee health module: http://ccirhken.ca/e-learning/?page_id=447 World Bank Group: http://www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/modules/index.html AAP Section of International Child Health (SOICH) International Child Health Competency-Based Objectives (2007): http://www2.aap.org/sections/ich/toolkit.htm
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Discussion Unclosable Gaps: Two gaps were identified that would be unable to be closed by traditional resources alone, as they deal with structural problems in society-at-large. Congregate care – skilled nursing facilities and/or assisted living could be helpful for some survivors if there could be a community of survivors that could live together AND appropriate services (including home care for those who live in assisted living facilities) existed. Because this population had been traumatized by institutionalization previously, congregate care generally designed for the elderly, is considered undesirable. As such, without specialized services, it is highly desirable for survivors to remain in their homes in situations which differ from those of other elderly. To date, no such facility has been built in the US, and it is anticipated that this is a need that is not feasible to meet. In-home psychiatric care – while numerous research participants indicated that this service is needed, there are an insufficient number of psychiatrists nationwide, and the need for psychiatric care, in general, is growing for all populations. It is not likely that this gap will be closed any time as the number of psychiatrists retiring continues to rise, and the number of residency spots for new psychiatrists is held steady. www.eposterboards.com Discussion (cont.) Existing services: Professional Social Work Services - includes services such as case management, clinical social work, mental health counseling, friendly visiting, financial guardianship, and social programs. In short, social work services include all services that would include direct services provided by licensed social workers and those overseen by licensed social workers. Services such as social work/case management are not adequately funded currently. One participant stated the need for these services clearly: The social worker helps them [survivors] to get hooked up to services they are resistant to or helps them through the barriers. They help them think about what their needs are. It is hard to get through the door and win their trust. On- on-one service is very expensive. Home Care - includes services such as housekeeping, companionship, in-home nursing and home health aides. There was unanimous agreement that one of the most import factors in preserving the dignity of survivors is the ability to remain at home. An important theme, more knowledge about survivors to the home health aides, emerged from the data. Specialized home care services were addressed by one participant: Aides are trained to understand the history and special needs of the survivors. For example, even knowing that chemical smells can trigger memories for the client. Transportation - includes door-to-door transportation to both medical appointments and social events designed for Holocaust survivors. While underfunded, participants agreed that this service was needed to help survivors remain in their homes and maintain their dignity: Survivors need transportation, otherwise they can’t access the city services. Food support - includes Meals-On-Wheels and additional supplementary support for food, including grocery store vouchers. Having abundant food was an important issue to survivors, who often hoard because they are afraid food will run out. One provider commented on the importance of food in keeping survivors in the community. Another noted the needed for Meals-On-Wheels: Food stamps don’t fulfill food for a whole week; some can’t go to the grocery store, so they need already made meals. Emergency Cash Assistance - The German government currently provides a limited amount of emergency cash to survivors for one-time expenses. This is similar to a small business’s “petty cash.” This is currently used for a wide range of expenses, some of which are actually long-term needs. Examples of how emergency cash is used includes: rent, utility bill, durable medical equipment such as hearing aids or hospital beds, and dental bills. One interviewee noted how this is often insufficient: It is not a generous enough cap for the survivors to maintain their dignity.… basic needs aren’t even met, capped at $2,500 is too little. Sometimes they are in the middle of their medical/dental work and they don’t know what to do when the $2,500 runs out. Conclusion and Implications While it is unlikely that some needs identified in this research will be able to be met in survivors’ lifetimes, many could. While most services identified in this research currently exist, all service providers indicated that inadequate funding make it likely that an increasing number of survivors’ needs will go unmet in the future. The population of Holocaust survivors is aging with the youngest being in their 70s. Research indicates that this population is expected to be reduced by 74% within 15 years (SSRS, 2016); however, the needs of the existing survivors will increase as they age. This will likely put a strain on survivors, their families, and the communities in which they live. Future research should focus on how to best expand and fund services for Holocaust survivors as they continue to age. References Cohen, S. M., Ukeles, J. B., & Miller, R. (2012). Jewish community study of New York: 2011 comprehensive report. New York: UJA Federation of New York. Eriksson, M., Räikkönen, K., & Eriksson, J. G. (2014). Early life stress and later health outcomes—findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(2), 111–116. Keinan-Boker, L., Shasha-Lavsky, H., Eilat-Zanani, S., Edri-Shur, A., & Shasha, S. M. (2015). Chronic health conditions in Jewish Holocaust survivors born during World War II. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 17(4), 206–212. Meyer, M. H., & Daniele, E. A. (2016). Gerontology: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions [2 volumes]: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions. ABC-CLIO. Mitka, M. (2014). Holocaust survivors’ health needs. JAMA, 311(10), 1005. SSRS. (2016). Gap analysis of services to holocaust survivors in New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. Media, PA: Author. Funding for this study was provided by UJA-Federation of New York
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Destroying Records Handling State Records Classifying Types of Records Identifying State Records Department of Environmental Health & Safety Records Management Program Classifying Types of State Records The four types of State Records are: Record Type Record Description Example of Record Confidential Records under restricted access or inaccessible to the public due to state or federal law. Information in personnel file; Student records; Audit working papers Vital Records containing information needed to continue operations during/after a crisis. Records that fulfill our obligations. Contracts; Patents; Academic records; Customer records; Lab notebooks; Policy or Procedure manuals Archival Records with enduring historical value that will be preserved on a continuing basis until an archivist indicates it no longer needs to be retained. Manuscripts; Maps; Photographs; Printed materials/recorded information relating to their history and culture of UT Dallas Transitory* Records with temporary usefulness and are not integral part of any other set of records. These records are required for only a limited period of time to complete an action. Routine messages; Junk mail; Preliminary document drafts; Materials with no informational value *Transitory records are the only records that can be disposed of without ever having been kept on file.
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Birthright (800) 550–4900 Provides free and confidential pregnancy testing; support for pregnant women; maternity and infant clothes, bottles, diapers, and layettes for newborns. Referrals for legal assistance, parenting classes, breast-feeding, child care, employment and education programs, adoption services and counseling, medicalcare and family counseling. Carenet (800) 395–HELP A network of Christian pregnancy centers that offer a variety of services including free pregnancy testing; birth, abstinence, and post-abortion counseling; housing and help with financial, medical, and material needs. Catholic Charities (800) CARE–002 Provides adoption services for birth mothers and adoptive parents,parenting classes, financial and material needs assistance, family counseling and housing. Referrals for legal assistance, child care, employment and education assistance, and medical assistance. Nurturing Network (800) TNN–4 MOM Individually tailored support to meet the needs of college and working women. Provides a nurturing home, counseling, medical services, employment, financial and educational assistance, and expedited college transfer.
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Students in distance education classes and seated classes have the same options for Writing Center assistance. The Writing Center is open to all students at Alamance Community College and may be used for any writing assignment in any course. Here you will find consultants who can offer guidance for any part of the writing process from brainstorming to final revision. A writing consultant will encourage you to explore ideas and will ask you questions about development, organization, grammar, and mechanics. Viewing writing as a process will help you to meet your own goals as a writer as well as to meet the requirements of a particular assignment. Over time, this process will improve your skill and help you achieve your academic and career goals. The Center offers: • Individual sessions, by appointment or walk-in, with a writing consultant who will read your paper and ask questions that will help you revise for development, organization, grammar, and mechanics. • Online (e-tutoring) consultations for help with your writing tasks if you cannot come to the Writing Center in person. • Computer space where you can revise after a consultation and ask questions as they arise. • Workshops on writing skills (by instructor request). The Writing Center is located at the Carrington-Scott Campus, Room 354 of the Main Building in the Academic Skills Lab (behind the Information Desk area). Hours Fall and spring: Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Summer: Monday-Thursday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
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