The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The 2.0 Graduation Policy Want to graduate? First, You Must Apply For Graduation. Pick up the “Intent to Graduate” form in the Office of Admissions/Records and submit it by the deadline below: Semester Month of Graduation Intent Form Due Summer Graduation August July 1 Fall Graduation December October 1 Spring Graduation May February There is no computer in the sky that automatically knows you have completed all your coursework since programs of study change from year to year. Secondly, there are several requirements for graduation. One that we’d like for you to especially be aware of is the 2.0 Graduation Policy. You must have successfully completed all required courses for the Associate and/or Certificate desired and have the required minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Further, you must have taken at least 16 hours of academic coursework at IVCC to graduate with an Associate Degree from IVCC, and/or you must have completed at IVCC at least 25% of the coursework required of your certificate program to graduate from IVCC. In doubt about CGPA? See the “Your GPA section” of this orientation! back | home | next
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High Need Academic Competence • • • • • • • Personal Competence • • • • • • • GPA is a 2.0 or below; Maybe on probation and at risk of being suspended or dismissed Does not complete courses successfully; receives D, INC, F grades, or withdraws from most or all courses Struggles greatly with academic challenges; cannot cope with challenges; gives up easily Does not have acquisition of time management skills; does not prioritize Chronic absences from or lateness to class and often takes extended breaks during class Work is of poor quality; unrealistic expectations of professors role; no accountability May have some knowledge of college and program resources, but does not utilize No interest in co-curricular activities and places no value to the importance of participation Cannot balance personal and academic life; focuses on personal life stressors and is easily distracted Does not participate in program and college activities Reflection on parental, familial and affective relationships, and feels powerless or has an unwillingness to make adjustments Is not aware of procrastination or refuses to address procrastination Chronic excuse making, blaming others; does not take responsibility; unrealistic Non-committal Mid Need Low Need • GPA is below 2.5; at risk of falling into probation Completes courses with inconsistent grades; may withdraw from a course Shows awareness of academic challenges; struggles to meet challenges successfully Shows awareness of time management issues, but struggles with prioritizing Attends class to meet minimum requirements and may have minor punctuality issues Work is of average to poor quality Shows awareness of college and program resources, but underutilized • • Is aware of co-curricular activities and shows some interest in participating Desires to be organized, but has difficulty balancing personal and academic life Inconsistent in participating in program and college activities Reflection on parental, familial and affective relationships, but has difficulty making adjustments Hesitant of collaborating with other students in program activities or group work Is aware of procrastinating but struggles with completing tasks and follow through Shows signs of anxiety when under stress • Is aware of importance of career exploration, and moderately confident in their choice of major Is aware of importance of professionalism Inconsistent with setting clear vocational plans and aspirations; difficulty identifying personal interests; some interest in educational and vocational exploration Is aware of study abroad opportunities, and considers it as an option Is aware of scholarship opportunities, and considers it as an option • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Career Planning Competence • • • • • Has not explored career paths, and indecisive as to what major to choose Conducts themselves unprofessionally Inability to identify clear vocational plans and aspirations; unaware of personal interests; distracted from pursuing educational and vocational exploration Views study abroad opportunities as far reaching and unrealistic options Views scholarship opportunities as far reaching and unrealistic options; unwilling to follow through with application process • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Maintain GPA of at least 3.0 Successfully complete all courses; rarely withdraws and only as a last resource Shows awareness of academic challenges; copes successfully with challenges Manages time efficiently, prioritizes Attends class regularly and is on time Work meets high quality standards Makes use of college and program resources Is aware of importance of participation in co-curricular activities Is organized/balances personal and academic life Actively participates in program and college activities Reflection on and readjustment of parental, familial and affective relationships Collaborates with other students in program activities Does not procrastinate Keeps stress levels under control Is aware of importance of active involvement in career exploration Is aware of importance of conducting oneself professionally Setting vocational plans & aspirations; identifying personal interests; educational and vocational exploration) Attended a study abroad workshop Attended a scholarship presentation Researched scholarship opportunities
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O 6 objectives of the UB grant Minimum 2.5 Grade point average Academic Performance--Grade Point Average (GPA) O O 85% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year. Academic Performance on Standardized Test: 77% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achievedthat the proficient Test in Math & Reading/LA onmath. the 10 grade levelproficient on state assessments in reading/language arts and Secondary School Retention and Graduation WKCE test O 96% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next to academic year, atgrade the next level grade level, or will have graduated secondary Pass the next or graduate with afrom regular school with a regular secondary school diploma. diplomaSchool Graduation (rigorous secondary school program of study) Secondary O O O 75% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had and expected high school graduation date the school will complete a Complete a rigorous HS curriculum (4inyears ofyear, core, 2 years rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate in that school year with a regular secondary school diploma. WL) O O Postsecondary Enrollment O 74% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project Senior willschool enroll in college (2school or 4year, year) the infall had an cohort expected high graduation date in the will enroll a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation immediately after graduation, file a deferment forschool, a from or will have received notification, by the fallor term immediately following high an institution ofdate higher (Reserves). education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next spring start academic semester (e.g. spring semester) O Postsecondary Completion Complete an Associates of Bachelor’s within 6 years of HS 57% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g., graduation spring term) as a result of acceptance by deferred enrollment, will attain either an O associate’s or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school.
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GPA CALCULATORS • The admission GPA is calculated first by using the overall GPA on the applicant’s transcript at the end of the application semester. If the overall GPA is lower than a 2.75, it will be recalculated based on the applicant’s last 60 hours of coursework. When calculating the Last 60 Hours GPA, full semesters must be used; therefore, the total hours may be in excess of 60. Either method of GPA calculation must meet the minimum 2.75 requirement for admission eligibility without exception. • Overall GPA - Use your transcript from myGateway. At the end, under "Transcript Totals", plug in the GPA hours and Quality Points from the Overall line. List any courses you are currently taking under "Courses not showing". Add in the number of hours and the letter grade you received or expect to receive to get an updated Overall GPA. • Last 60 Hours GPA - Use the Class History from your Degree Evaluation to see your courses listed in order taken regardless of location. Start with the most current coursework. Enter in the Semester, Term Graded Attempted and Term Quality Points. Make sure the Term GPA matches. Enter in enough semesters so that they, plus what you are currently enrolled in, total at least 60 hours. You must use full semesters. Enter the courses you are currently taking under Courses not showing. Add in the number of hours and the grade you received or expect to receive to get an updated Last 60 Hour GPA.
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Academic Program Options What educational options are available at IVCC? Okay, now that you know how to get started here at IVCC, what about academic program options? At IVCC, you can choose from five different degrees and a variety of certificate programs. If you want to transfer to a four-year college or university, you will pursue either an Associate in Arts (A. A.) degree, an Associate in Science (A. S.) degree, or an Associate in Engineering Science (A. E. S.) degree. These three degrees are called transfer degrees. If you want to learn a professional skill that will result in immediate employment after IVCC, you will pursue either an Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.) degree or a certificate program. Another degree option available to you is the Associate in General Studies (A. G. S.) degree. This degree is individualized to meet the needs and interests of the student. It allows for the combination of both transfer and career courses. While not intended to be a transfer degree, the A. G. S. degree recognizes completion of two years of college. back | home | next
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The City University of New York 2016-2017 Year-End Financial Report Numerical Change: Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2017 I&DR Teaching I&DR Support Staff Academic Support Staff Student Services Staff M&O Staff General Admin Staff GIS Staff SEEK / CD Staff Other Staff Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Baruch College Brooklyn College City College Hunter College John Jay College Lehman College Medgar Evers College NYC College of Technology Queens College College of Staten Island York College Graduate Center CUNY School of Law School of Journalism School of Professional Studies School of Public Health (6) 7 (1) (27) (15) (1) 2 (24) 3 (9) (15) (26) 0 (2) 1 49 5 (7) (4) (4) (2) 0 (6) (3) (11) (1) (2) 2 1 1 2 1 9 (2) 29 9 10 10 2 3 2 5 2 (2) 0 0 (39) 2 (5) 3 2 (2) 7 (4) (2) 1 2 (4) 0 (4) 0 0 2 1 (2) 3 (2) (2) 1 5 1 (1) (2) 3 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 (3) 0 (3) 1 3 (2) (6) 0 (1) (1) 0 0 0 (11) 3 10 4 (2) 2 8 0 (6) (1) 0 (2) (1) 1 1 7 5 (11) 9 (5) 4 (1) (3) 0 1 1 3 (1) 0 0 22 0 24 (5) (9) (8) 0 (1) (4) (6) (5) (5) 5 (15) 0 0 3 0 (3) 3 (6) 3 10 2 (1) (2) (5) 1 (2) 0 0 0 0 1 0 (5) 12 4 (6) 7 (1) (2) (7) 0 4 (3) 3 (1) 14 27 (1) (2) (10) 6 3 1 3 (1) 0 0 (3) (5) 0 1 1 (10) (5) 4 (24) (6) 0 (5) (2) (3) (4) (2) 5 (4) (5) 14 9 2 (2) (5) (18) 8 0 3 3 (4) (3) 0 (1) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 (2) 3 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 (1) 2 0 (1) 0 1 (2) 1 0 0 0 0 0 (1) (2) (56) (1) 0 (1) (7) (3) 1 (3) (3) (2) 0 (8) 16 0 8 6 9 1 2 0 5 3 1 6 3 1 1 1 (1) 10 Senior College Total (64) (28) 40 (3) 7 (9) 13 24 (26) 1 46 (17) (26) (17) 8 2 (70) 56 BMCC Bronx CC Guttman CC Hostos CC Kingsborough CC LaGuardia CC Queensborough CC 10 (1) 2 1 7 (4) 9 16 16 0 40 (7) 8 19 13 19 (4) 5 (4) 9 8 10 0 0 (3) (3) 7 (1) (1) (5) 2 1 (4) 16 1 20 1 (1) 0 (1) 20 0 10 6 10 6 0 3 4 (1) 1 (1) 0 (6) 4 (1) 11 4 (11) 8 (3) 1 1 (10) (7) 1 (3) (7) (1) (3) 3 0 7 0 6 9 2 (1) 2 (1) 2 (6) 2 1 (8) 9 13 (6) (6) 12 3 (7) (2) 0 1 (1) (1) (3) 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (4) (5) (5) (3) 0 (2) (2) 7 1 0 7 0 1 (3) Community College Total 24 92 46 10 10 39 39 (4) 11 (30) 27 (1) 17 (13) 3 0 (21) 13 Shared Services 0 0 0 Source:Administration Average Salary Report, FISM115 V&Z Central 0 (Excludes IFR 0 positions) 0 0 0 (7) (3) (5) (9) (1) (4) (0) (2) 0 0 0 0 (7) (7) (25) (7) 21 0 (22) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 48 17 (15) (29) 59 (50) 12 (52) 11 2 (91) 69 Senior College Staffing Spring 2017 as of 4/27/17, Prior Year(s) from FY16 Q1 Report as of 10/29/15 Community College Staffing Spring 2017 as of 4/21/17, Prior Year(s) from FY16 Q1 Report as of 10/23/15 Central Staff Includes Non Tax-Levy Positions as of 4/27/17 Note: OtherTotal Staff includes institutes such as Calandra Institute, University (40) 64 Puerto Rico 86 Institute, Sophie 7 Davis and Suspense at the Senior Colleges; for Community Colleges it includes Suspense 7 25
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The City University of New York 2016-2017 Year-End Financial Report Percentage Change: Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2017 I&DR Teaching I&DR Support Staff Academic Support Staff Student Services Staff M&O Staff General Admin Staff GIS Staff SEEK / CD Staff Other Staff Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 to Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Fall 2016 Spring 2017 Baruch College Brooklyn College City College Hunter College John Jay College Lehman College Medgar Evers College NYC College of Technology Queens College College of Staten Island York College Graduate Center CUNY School of Law School of Journalism -1.3% 1.3% -0.2% -4.1% -4.0% -0.2% 1.2% -5.7% 0.5% -2.5% -7.4% -7.7% 0.0% -10.5% 10.0% 0.0% 1.1% -1.4% -0.7% -0.6% -0.6% 0.0% -3.6% -0.8% -2.0% -0.3% -1.1% 0.6% 2.3% 5.9% 18.2% 2.0% 7.0% -1.2% 12.7% 4.7% 7.6% 7.1% 2.3% 3.0% 1.4% 3.1% 2.7% -2.8% 0.0% 0.0% -70.9% 0.0% -3.6% 1.8% 0.8% -1.0% 5.0% -2.6% -2.3% 1.0% 1.4% -2.4% 0.0% -5.8% 0.0% 0.0% 12.5% 50.0% -6.3% 4.8% -3.0% -3.6% 4.8% 10.9% 2.6% -2.6% -3.7% 11.5% 4.2% 0.0% 20.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 6.7% 0.0% 1.6% -5.7% 0.0% -5.9% 2.5% 8.1% -3.8% -20.7% 0.0% -1.5% -16.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -6.4% 2.1% 12.0% 2.8% -1.6% 2.2% 14.0% 0.0% -5.0% -1.0% 0.0% -5.0% -4.2% 14.3% 0.0% 0.0% 3.1% -7.6% 9.7% -3.4% 3.3% -1.1% -4.6% 0.0% 0.9% 1.0% 4.5% -2.6% 0.0% 0.0% 2200.0% 0.0% 20.5% -4.0% -4.8% -4.2% 0.0% -0.9% -5.2% -7.9% -3.3% -4.4% 7.2% -78.9% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -2.1% 2.5% -3.4% 1.7% 11.8% 1.7% -1.4% -2.9% -3.4% 0.9% -2.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -5.7% 13.2% 3.8% -6.7% 13.5% -1.4% -2.7% -8.6% 0.0% 7.5% -6.5% 15.8% -11.1% 0.0% 0.0% -1.2% -2.4% -9.7% 5.5% 3.6% 1.7% 4.4% -1.4% 0.0% 0.0% -5.3% -11.6% 0.0% 12.5% 7.1% -37.0% -3.1% 2.7% -10.8% -3.0% 0.0% -4.5% -3.2% -3.2% -3.3% -2.4% 5.4% -4.4% -18.5% 175.0% 81.8% 0.0% -1.3% -3.3% -9.0% 4.1% 0.0% 2.9% 4.9% -4.4% -2.5% 0.0% -1.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.5% 0.0% 50.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 16.7% -18.2% 50.0% 16.7% 14.3% 20.0% 50.0% 20.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 40.0% 0.0% -14.3% 22.2% 0.0% -14.3% 0.0% 16.7% -33.3% 16.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -100.0% -100.0% -75.7% -7.1% 0.0% -100.0% -100.0% -100.0% 5.9% -100.0% -100.0% -4.1% 0.0% -100.0% 66.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 50.0% 7.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.6% 0.0% 0.0% 2.1% 0.0% 0.0% -2.5% 0.0% Senior College Total -1.3% -0.6% 2.4% -0.2% 1.3% -1.7% 1.0% 1.9% -2.0% 0.1% 4.9% -1.7% -1.7% -1.1% 11.4% 2.6% -34.0% 41.2% BMCC Bronx CC Guttman CC Hostos CC Kingsborough CC LaGuardia CC Queensborough CC 1.9% -0.3% 4.5% 0.6% 2.1% -1.1% 2.4% 2.9% 5.3% 0.0% 22.6% -2.0% 2.2% 4.9% 11.0% 17.3% -80.0% 6.0% -3.2% 7.4% 5.4% 7.6% 0.0% 0.0% -3.4% -2.5% 5.3% -0.6% -2.2% -9.1% 33.3% 4.0% -9.1% 16.8% 2.3% 45.5% 2.0% -12.5% 0.0% -2.5% 18.0% 0.0% 6.3% 8.1% 34.5% 6.7% 0.0% 1.9% 3.6% -0.6% 1.3% -2.6% 0.0% -5.2% 2.5% -0.9% 8.1% 3.7% -84.6% 12.7% -2.2% 2.0% 1.0% -6.8% -6.2% 50.0% -4.2% -5.3% -2.0% -3.0% 4.4% 0.0% 23.3% 0.0% 9.2% 10.7% 3.2% -1.4% 3.2% -2.7% 3.6% -8.5% 2.2% 1.6% -4.8% 7.6% 144.4% -6.7% -4.9% 7.1% 2.8% -4.5% -1.6% 0.0% 1.2% -0.9% -0.6% -2.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 16.7% 0.0% 50.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -66.7% -83.3% -100.0% -100.0% 0.0% -100.0% -28.6% 350.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -60.0% 1.1% 4.2% 6.5% 1.3% 3.2% 12.1% 5.3% -0.5% 1.8% -4.9% 6.3% -0.2% 2.2% -1.6% 8.8% 0.0% -72.4% 162.5% Shared 0.0% Source:Services Average Salary Report, FISM115 0.0% V&Z (Excludes0.0% IFR positions)0.0% Central 0.0%Prior Year(s) 0.0% 0.0% SeniorAdministration College Staffing Spring 2017 as of 4/27/17, from FY16 Q10.0% Report as of 10/29/15 -14.6% -4.6% -12.3% -15.8% -13.9% -13.9% -9.7% -9.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -1.5% -4.9% -5.6% -5.3% 9.0% 0.0% -8.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.7% 1.7% 2.3% 0.8% -0.8% -1.5% 3.0% -2.5% 0.5% -2.0% 10.6% 1.7% -38.7% 47.9% School of Professional Studies School of Public Health Community College Total Community College Staffing Spring 2017 as of 4/21/17, Prior Year(s) from FY16 Q1 Report as of 10/23/15 Central Staff Includes Non Tax-Levy Positions as of 4/27/17 Note: Other Staff includes institutes such as Calandra Institute, Puerto Rico Institute, Sophie University Total -0.6% 0.9%Colleges it3.6% 0.3% Davis and Suspense at the Senior Colleges; for Community includes Suspense 26
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New Graduate Fellowship Award Amount: $1,000 per year • APPLY HERE: New Graduate Fellowship Application • You must be admitted to a program BEFORE you apply. • Fellowship applications from non-admitted students will be deleted, as will applications that are received after the deadline. • Applications without an essay will not be considered. • The Fall application deadline is May 1; Spring deadline is Nov 1. • Applications with no student ID number will be deleted. • Award Amount: up to $1,000 per year. • How much money can the New Graduate Fellowship save you? Minimum Qualifications*: • Be accepted to a degree-seeking program by May 1/Nov. 1 • Be in your first semester of graduate school at UT Tyler. (This award is for incoming students only; if you are currently a UT Tyler student you are not eligible for this award. Please see the Scholarships page.) • New graduate students must have a final GPA of at least 3.25 on their undergraduate degree, OR entrance exam scores that meet or exceed the following: GRE 307; GMAT 500; MAT 410 • Enroll full-time (nine credit hours for the semester awarded) • *Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee an award. If you are not admitted to a program by May 1/Nov. 1 you will not qualify for the award Important Notes: • The New Graduate Fellowships only cover the first year. Second-year students should speak with their advisor about the possibility of an assistantship, visit Career Services to look for on-campus work, or apply for other scholarships. • Only first year, full-time students are eligible for this particular scholarship, and may only apply for their semester of entry. • For students who do not qualify for the NGF, the second chance fellowship application will be opening after grades post from your first term! Students must have a 3.25 to apply. • We receive hundreds of applications, so be sure your paragraph explaining why you deserve the scholarship really stands out from the crowd!
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Other Branch Prediction Algorithms Problem 16.3 Taken Not taken Not taken Part a Predict taken Taken Not taken Predict taken again Taken Part b Predict taken Taken Taken Not taken Predict not taken Not taken Taken Predict taken again Taken Predict not taken again Not taken Taken Predict not taken Not taken Predict not taken again Not taken Taken Not taken Not taken Fig. 16.6 Predict taken Taken Not taken Predict taken again Taken Predict not taken Not taken Predict not taken again Taken   Computer Architecture, Data Path and Control Slide 71
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Decision Tree Model for F14 Freshmen GPA: Part 2—HS GPA > 92.0 Decision Tree Model for F14 Freshmen GPA: Part 2—HS GPA > 92.0 HS GPA>92.0 or Missing Scholarship = Yes HS GPA >=96.5 or missing Math Placement Exam >= 5 Math Placement Exam < 5 Scholarship = No HS GPA < 96.5 Logs per non-STEM crs,wks 2-6 >=29.1 Logs per non-STEM crs,wks 2-6 <29.1 LMS logins per non-STEM crs. Wk 2-6 ‘ >=10.4 AP STEM Crs. >=1 AP STEM Crs = 0 LMS logins per non-STEM crs. wk 2-6 < 10.4 Logs per STEM crs, wks 2-6 >=10.9 or miss. Logs per STEM crs. wks 2 6 < 10.9 Logs per STEM Crs., wks 2-6 >=15.6 Logs per STEM Crs, wk 2-6 <15.6 Ethnic Group = White , Hisp. Ethnic Group= Asian, Afr. Amer., Unk. SAT Math >=70 0 SAT Math <700 or miss. Avg HS. CR, M Wrt >=183 0 miss Avg. HS CR, M, Wrt< 1830 DFW STEM Crs Total >=2 DFW STEM Crs Total <2 SAT Math >=76 0 SAT Math <760 DFW nonSTEM 1st yrs >=28% DFW nonSTEM 1st yrs <28% STEM Crs logs Wk 1 >=8 STEM Crs logs Wk 1 <8 or miss Avg. GPA = 3.63 N= 285 Avg. GPA 3.40 N = 83 Avg. GPA =3.50 N= 73 Avg. GPA = 3.05 N=30 Avg. GPA = 3.76 N=26 Avg. GPA = 3.52 N = 74 Avg. GPA = 3.59 N = 54 Avg. GPA = 3.13 N = 54 Avg. GPA = 3.23 N= 163 Avg. GPA = 3.49 N=101 Avg. GPA = 3.76 N = 11 Avg. GPA = 3.03 N= 194 Avg. GPA = 3.05 N= 72 Avg. GPA = 2.90 N = 73 Avg. GPA= 1.30 N=11 Avg. GPA = 2.52 N= 13 16
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 Librarians are unique when it comes to their leave: they are considered faculty with regards to their leave, however their leave works differently than that of faculty or staff. Although, like faculty, Librarians receive personal leave and are entitled to bank time.  For Librarians, there are a total of 28 FNWD days (210 Hours); this is the 23 during the 9 months plus the 5 for the week of the 4th of July. At the beginning of the Academic Year in August, we take the 210 hours and subtract all the days (hours) the College is closed for the Academic Year. The remaining hours are granted to Librarians as Personal Leave. Of those personal leave hours, in September of each year, HR automatically banks 22.50 hours.  The balance in your FNWD Bank for the current Academic Year will roll over into the new Academic Year. As we move into the new Academic Year, HR will once again take the 28 FNWD (210.00 hours) subtract the hours the College will be closed during that new Academic Year and the remaining balance will be applied to your personal leave. In September we will automatically bank 22.50 of those personal leave hours for you. Please note, any unused personal leave at the end of each Academic Year will be forfeited. Regarding banking time, please note, the maximum amount of personal leave that can be banked during an Academic Year is 37.50 hours. As HR automatically banks 22.50 hours for you each year in September, you can bank up to an additional 15 hours for a total of 37.5 hours. You can bank those additional 15 hours on a FNWD and/or administrative day as identified in the Academic Calendar, so long as the college is open; i.e. you can’t bank time when the College is closed, for example Labor Day.  Time in your FNWD Bank can roll from Academic Year to Academic Year, up to a maximum of 45 days (337.50 hours). LIBRARIANS
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