The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! To compute your GPA 1. Multiply the credit hours for the class by the grade points you made for the class. For example: a 3 hr course with an A grade would be 3 X 4. Do this for each course. 2. Add all of these up to get your total “grade points”. 3. Divide by the total number of credit hours, and there you have it - your GPA. Let’s try an example! back | home | next
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Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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Decision Tree Model for F14 Freshmen GPA: Part 2—HS GPA > 92.0 Decision Tree Model for F14 Freshmen GPA: Part 2—HS GPA > 92.0 HS GPA>92.0 or Missing Scholarship = Yes HS GPA >=96.5 or missing Math Placement Exam >= 5 Math Placement Exam < 5 Scholarship = No HS GPA < 96.5 Logs per non-STEM crs,wks 2-6 >=29.1 Logs per non-STEM crs,wks 2-6 <29.1 LMS logins per non-STEM crs. Wk 2-6 ‘ >=10.4 AP STEM Crs. >=1 AP STEM Crs = 0 LMS logins per non-STEM crs. wk 2-6 < 10.4 Logs per STEM crs, wks 2-6 >=10.9 or miss. Logs per STEM crs. wks 2 6 < 10.9 Logs per STEM Crs., wks 2-6 >=15.6 Logs per STEM Crs, wk 2-6 <15.6 Ethnic Group = White , Hisp. Ethnic Group= Asian, Afr. Amer., Unk. SAT Math >=70 0 SAT Math <700 or miss. Avg HS. CR, M Wrt >=183 0 miss Avg. HS CR, M, Wrt< 1830 DFW STEM Crs Total >=2 DFW STEM Crs Total <2 SAT Math >=76 0 SAT Math <760 DFW nonSTEM 1st yrs >=28% DFW nonSTEM 1st yrs <28% STEM Crs logs Wk 1 >=8 STEM Crs logs Wk 1 <8 or miss Avg. GPA = 3.63 N= 285 Avg. GPA 3.40 N = 83 Avg. GPA =3.50 N= 73 Avg. GPA = 3.05 N=30 Avg. GPA = 3.76 N=26 Avg. GPA = 3.52 N = 74 Avg. GPA = 3.59 N = 54 Avg. GPA = 3.13 N = 54 Avg. GPA = 3.23 N= 163 Avg. GPA = 3.49 N=101 Avg. GPA = 3.76 N = 11 Avg. GPA = 3.03 N= 194 Avg. GPA = 3.05 N= 72 Avg. GPA = 2.90 N = 73 Avg. GPA= 1.30 N=11 Avg. GPA = 2.52 N= 13 16
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GPA CALCULATORS • The admission GPA is calculated first by using the overall GPA on the applicant’s transcript at the end of the application semester. If the overall GPA is lower than a 2.75, it will be recalculated based on the applicant’s last 60 hours of coursework. When calculating the Last 60 Hours GPA, full semesters must be used; therefore, the total hours may be in excess of 60. Either method of GPA calculation must meet the minimum 2.75 requirement for admission eligibility without exception. • Overall GPA - Use your transcript from myGateway. At the end, under "Transcript Totals", plug in the GPA hours and Quality Points from the Overall line. List any courses you are currently taking under "Courses not showing". Add in the number of hours and the letter grade you received or expect to receive to get an updated Overall GPA. • Last 60 Hours GPA - Use the Class History from your Degree Evaluation to see your courses listed in order taken regardless of location. Start with the most current coursework. Enter in the Semester, Term Graded Attempted and Term Quality Points. Make sure the Term GPA matches. Enter in enough semesters so that they, plus what you are currently enrolled in, total at least 60 hours. You must use full semesters. Enter the courses you are currently taking under Courses not showing. Add in the number of hours and the grade you received or expect to receive to get an updated Last 60 Hour GPA.
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Campaign Example First Semester       C  (3 credit hours)                              C  (3 credit hours)                            C  (3 credit hours)                             C  (3 credit hours)                             C  (3 credit hours)   First Semester Total = 15 hour with 2.0 GPA                                 Second Semester   A (3 credit hours) A (3 credit hours) A (3 credit hours) A (3 credit hours) A (3 credit hours)   Second Semester Total  = 15 hours with 4.0 GPA    First Semester GPA + Second Semester GPA = 3.0 Cumulative GPA   (You may utilize a GPA calculator to help determine your possible GPA outcomes at the end of the semester at http://registrar.uncc.edu/gpa-calculator )   
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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