The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The most important IVCC policies that sometimes get students in trouble are: 1. Your Grade Point Average 2. The Drop/Withdrawal Policy 3. The “I” (Incomplete) Grade Policy 4. The 2.0 Graduation Policy back | home | next You can find more information on college policies by visiting the college website at www.ivcc.edu, reviewing the college catalog and student handbook.
View full slide show




The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The 2.0 Graduation Policy Want to graduate? First, You Must Apply For Graduation. Pick up the “Intent to Graduate” form in the Office of Admissions/Records and submit it by the deadline below: Semester Month of Graduation Intent Form Due Summer Graduation August July 1 Fall Graduation December October 1 Spring Graduation May February There is no computer in the sky that automatically knows you have completed all your coursework since programs of study change from year to year. Secondly, there are several requirements for graduation. One that we’d like for you to especially be aware of is the 2.0 Graduation Policy. You must have successfully completed all required courses for the Associate and/or Certificate desired and have the required minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Further, you must have taken at least 16 hours of academic coursework at IVCC to graduate with an Associate Degree from IVCC, and/or you must have completed at IVCC at least 25% of the coursework required of your certificate program to graduate from IVCC. In doubt about CGPA? See the “Your GPA section” of this orientation! back | home | next
View full slide show




Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
View full slide show




Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
View full slide show




                           www.ndsu.edu/arch www.ndsu.edu/bisonconnection www.ndsu.edu/cms www.ndsu.edu/diversityresources www.ndsu.edu/english www.ndsu.edu/hnes www.ndsu.edu/its www.ndsu.edu/itsecurity www.ndsu.edu/mu www.ndsu.edu/student_success www.ndsu.edu/recordsmanagement www.ndsu.edu/tfac www.ndsu.edu/univsenate www.ndsu.edu/vpit www.ndsu.edu/vpur www.ndsu.edu/weather connectnd.ndus.edu helpcenter.ndsu.edu sits.ndus.edu ag.ndsu.edu www.ndsu.edu/finearts www.ndsu.edu/gradschool www.ndsu.edu/international www.ndsu.edu/news www.ndsu.edu/physics www.ndsu.edu/registrar www.ndsu.edu/vpsa                            www.ndsu.edu/alcoholinfo www.ndsu.edu/bulletin www.ndsu.edu/carringtonrec www.ndsu.edu/cdfs www.ndsu.edu/commencement www.ndsu.edu/communication www.ndsu.edu/counseling www.ndsu.edu/disabilityservices www.ndsu.edu/dining_services www.ndsu.edu/eci www.ndsu.edu/education www.ndsu.edu/forestservice www.ndsu.edu/ime www.ndsu.edu/modernlanguages www.ndsu.edu/oira www.ndsu.edu/pesticide www.ndsu.edu/president www.ndsu.edu/pkp www.ndsu.edu/saem www.ndsu.edu/sheepandgoat www.ndsu.edu/staff_senate www.ndsu.edu/statistics www.ndsu.edu/trio www.ndsu.edu/vpaa www.ndsu.edu/web www.ndsu.edu/webmaster www.ndsu.edu/wellness
View full slide show




REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
View full slide show




The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The “I” - Incomplete Grade Policy Talk with your Instructor. Explain the situation and ask if an “I” grade might be appropriate.An “Incomplete” (“I”) is a temporary grade assigned when illness, unavoidable absence, or other reasons satisfactory to the instructor prevent completion of the course requirements by the end of the semester. A grade of “I” must be satisfactorily removed, as designated by the instructor, no later than the last class day of the semester following the issuance of the incomplete, or the “I” will be changed to an “F” or fail grade. Important - students cannot re-register for the course to satisfy an "I" grade. back | home | next
View full slide show




O 6 objectives of the UB grant Minimum 2.5 Grade point average Academic Performance--Grade Point Average (GPA) O O 85% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year. Academic Performance on Standardized Test: 77% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achievedthat the proficient Test in Math & Reading/LA onmath. the 10 grade levelproficient on state assessments in reading/language arts and Secondary School Retention and Graduation WKCE test O 96% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next to academic year, atgrade the next level grade level, or will have graduated secondary Pass the next or graduate with afrom regular school with a regular secondary school diploma. diplomaSchool Graduation (rigorous secondary school program of study) Secondary O O O 75% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had and expected high school graduation date the school will complete a Complete a rigorous HS curriculum (4inyears ofyear, core, 2 years rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate in that school year with a regular secondary school diploma. WL) O O Postsecondary Enrollment O 74% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project Senior willschool enroll in college (2school or 4year, year) the infall had an cohort expected high graduation date in the will enroll a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation immediately after graduation, file a deferment forschool, a from or will have received notification, by the fallor term immediately following high an institution ofdate higher (Reserves). education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next spring start academic semester (e.g. spring semester) O Postsecondary Completion Complete an Associates of Bachelor’s within 6 years of HS 57% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g., graduation spring term) as a result of acceptance by deferred enrollment, will attain either an O associate’s or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school.
View full slide show




Frequently Asked Questions Q: Are there tutors available if I have trouble with any of my classes, especially math? A: Yes, the Peer Tutoring Center, located in CRC-D, offers free tutoring to all IVCC students in almost all subject areas. Call 815-2240479 to arrange your tutoring session. Q: How can I be certain my classes will transfer to a four-year college or university? A: Our Counselors can assist you with selecting the right courses. The Counseling Center, located in E-201, also has transfer guide sheets from most Illinois four-year colleges. Q: Do I buy or rent my textbooks? A: You can buy textbooks from the IVCC bookstore located in the Main Building C, to the right of the Lobby. Some textbooks may be available for rental. Q: I have a disability. Where can I receive reasonable accommodations? A: The Disability Services Office at IVCC assists students in achieving success in their college classes. At IVCC, professional staff and faculty, along with many academic and adaptive support services, are available to help students meet their individual special needs. For more information, contact Special Needs Coordinators: Tina Hardy 815-224-0284 or Judy Mika 815-224-0350. back | home | next
View full slide show