Linked/W Eng 071 19 EDU 100 01 ENG 091 01 MAT 001 06 HUM 100 01 PSY 101 05 EDU 101 01 SOC 101 05 SOC 101 01 MAT 001 02 ENG 071 03 ENG 101 10 PSY 122 02 ENG 071 10 ENG 101 11 ENG 101 25 Time 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:45 8:30-10:20 10:30-11:30 7:30-8:20 1:30-2:45 10:30-11:45 9-10:45 8:30-9:20 9-10:15 9:30-10:20 11:30-12:20 10:30-11:45 12:30-1:20 9-10:15 12:30-1:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 6-8:45 pm 9-11:45 9:30-10:20 8:30-9:20 12:30-1:45 12:30-1:20 9:30-10:20 Room HH 219 SA 102 AR Lib 3 AR 211 NA G 9 NA 211 BH 002 NA G 11 SA 006 AR 211 HH 114 NA G11 BH 002 NA G11 SA 006 HH 116 ENG 071 54 ENG 071 52 PSY 122 52 HUM 101 50 SOC 101 50 Day MWF MW MWF T MWF T-R MW TR MWF MWF MWF MWF TR MWF TR MWF MWF MWF T S MWF MWF WF MWF MWF ENG 101 64 PSY 123 50 ENG 071 61 PSY 101 59 ENG 071 64 COM 103 52 PSY 100 51 PSY 101 64 TR WF TR TR TR TR WF TR 9-10:15 12-1:15 1:30-2:45 9-10:15 9-10:15 10:30-11:45 10:30-11:45 7:30-8:45 LC 318 LC 113 LF 205 LC 211 LC 110 LC 201 LP 405 LC 104 SOC 101 30 NA G 11 LD 301 LF 205 LC 207 LF 214 LC 115 Instructor TBA TBA Black Delmonaco TBA Pisarik Higgins Ogburn Alessi Caruso Laughlin Davidson Regan Laughlin Davidson TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA Schleicher TBA Regan Ryan TBA Hutchinson TBA Gibbons TBA McKeon,R 11 Gray Keen IDS Sec IDS 101 01 IDS 101 02 IDS 101 03 IDS 101 04 IDS 101 05 IDS 101 06 IDS 101 07 IDS 101 08 IDS 101 09 IDS 101 10 IDS 101 11 IDS 101 12 IDS 101 13 IDS 101 14 IDS 101 15 IDS 101 16 IDS 101 17 IDS 101 18 IDS 101 30 IDS 101 31 IDS 101 50 IDS 101 51 IDS 101 52 IDS 101 53 IDS 101 54 IDS 101 55 IDS 101 56 IDS 101 57 IDS 101 58 IDS 101 59 IDS 101 60 IDS 101 61 IDS 101 62 IDS 101 63 Instructor TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA DAY M M M R W R M R F W W F T M T M W F T S M M W M F W R F T T R T W R Time 8:30-9:20 9:30-10:20 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 12:30-1:20 12-12:20 11-11:50 9:30-10:20 10:30-11:20 8:30-9:20 10:30-11:20 12-12:50 1:30-2:20 8-8:50 1:30-2:20 10:30-11:20 8:30-9:20 5-5:50 pm 12-12:50 8:30-9:20 9:30-10:20 11:30-12:20 11:30-12:20 8:30-9:20 8-8:50 8-8:50 1:30-2:20 12:30-1:20 10:30-11:20 10:30-11:20 9:30-10:20 9:30-10:20 9-9:50 Room NA 102 NA 102 HH 213 AR 110 HH 112 SA 006 BH 002 AR-Lib 3 BH 103 NA 211 SA 103 SA 103 BH 002 HH 212 HH 310 HH 220 NA 117 BH 103 NA G9 NA G9 LC 209 LC 209 LC 112 LC 105 LC 306 LC 306 LC 110 LC 213 A LC 213 LP 403 LF 205 LC 118 LC 214 LP 405
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Other Branch Prediction Algorithms Problem 16.3 Taken Not taken Not taken Part a Predict taken Taken Not taken Predict taken again Taken Part b Predict taken Taken Taken Not taken Predict not taken Not taken Taken Predict taken again Taken Predict not taken again Not taken Taken Predict not taken Not taken Predict not taken again Not taken Taken Not taken Not taken Fig. 16.6 Predict taken Taken Not taken Predict taken again Taken Predict not taken Not taken Predict not taken again Taken   Computer Architecture, Data Path and Control Slide 71
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Discussion Unclosable Gaps: Two gaps were identified that would be unable to be closed by traditional resources alone, as they deal with structural problems in society-at-large. Congregate care – skilled nursing facilities and/or assisted living could be helpful for some survivors if there could be a community of survivors that could live together AND appropriate services (including home care for those who live in assisted living facilities) existed. Because this population had been traumatized by institutionalization previously, congregate care generally designed for the elderly, is considered undesirable. As such, without specialized services, it is highly desirable for survivors to remain in their homes in situations which differ from those of other elderly. To date, no such facility has been built in the US, and it is anticipated that this is a need that is not feasible to meet. In-home psychiatric care – while numerous research participants indicated that this service is needed, there are an insufficient number of psychiatrists nationwide, and the need for psychiatric care, in general, is growing for all populations. It is not likely that this gap will be closed any time as the number of psychiatrists retiring continues to rise, and the number of residency spots for new psychiatrists is held steady. www.eposterboards.com Discussion (cont.) Existing services: Professional Social Work Services - includes services such as case management, clinical social work, mental health counseling, friendly visiting, financial guardianship, and social programs. In short, social work services include all services that would include direct services provided by licensed social workers and those overseen by licensed social workers. Services such as social work/case management are not adequately funded currently. One participant stated the need for these services clearly: The social worker helps them [survivors] to get hooked up to services they are resistant to or helps them through the barriers. They help them think about what their needs are. It is hard to get through the door and win their trust. On- on-one service is very expensive. Home Care - includes services such as housekeeping, companionship, in-home nursing and home health aides. There was unanimous agreement that one of the most import factors in preserving the dignity of survivors is the ability to remain at home. An important theme, more knowledge about survivors to the home health aides, emerged from the data. Specialized home care services were addressed by one participant: Aides are trained to understand the history and special needs of the survivors. For example, even knowing that chemical smells can trigger memories for the client. Transportation - includes door-to-door transportation to both medical appointments and social events designed for Holocaust survivors. While underfunded, participants agreed that this service was needed to help survivors remain in their homes and maintain their dignity: Survivors need transportation, otherwise they can’t access the city services. Food support - includes Meals-On-Wheels and additional supplementary support for food, including grocery store vouchers. Having abundant food was an important issue to survivors, who often hoard because they are afraid food will run out. One provider commented on the importance of food in keeping survivors in the community. Another noted the needed for Meals-On-Wheels: Food stamps don’t fulfill food for a whole week; some can’t go to the grocery store, so they need already made meals. Emergency Cash Assistance - The German government currently provides a limited amount of emergency cash to survivors for one-time expenses. This is similar to a small business’s “petty cash.” This is currently used for a wide range of expenses, some of which are actually long-term needs. Examples of how emergency cash is used includes: rent, utility bill, durable medical equipment such as hearing aids or hospital beds, and dental bills. One interviewee noted how this is often insufficient: It is not a generous enough cap for the survivors to maintain their dignity.… basic needs aren’t even met, capped at $2,500 is too little. Sometimes they are in the middle of their medical/dental work and they don’t know what to do when the $2,500 runs out. Conclusion and Implications While it is unlikely that some needs identified in this research will be able to be met in survivors’ lifetimes, many could. While most services identified in this research currently exist, all service providers indicated that inadequate funding make it likely that an increasing number of survivors’ needs will go unmet in the future. The population of Holocaust survivors is aging with the youngest being in their 70s. Research indicates that this population is expected to be reduced by 74% within 15 years (SSRS, 2016); however, the needs of the existing survivors will increase as they age. This will likely put a strain on survivors, their families, and the communities in which they live. Future research should focus on how to best expand and fund services for Holocaust survivors as they continue to age. References Cohen, S. M., Ukeles, J. B., & Miller, R. (2012). Jewish community study of New York: 2011 comprehensive report. New York: UJA Federation of New York. Eriksson, M., Räikkönen, K., & Eriksson, J. G. (2014). Early life stress and later health outcomes—findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(2), 111–116. Keinan-Boker, L., Shasha-Lavsky, H., Eilat-Zanani, S., Edri-Shur, A., & Shasha, S. M. (2015). Chronic health conditions in Jewish Holocaust survivors born during World War II. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 17(4), 206–212. Meyer, M. H., & Daniele, E. A. (2016). Gerontology: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions [2 volumes]: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions. ABC-CLIO. Mitka, M. (2014). Holocaust survivors’ health needs. JAMA, 311(10), 1005. SSRS. (2016). Gap analysis of services to holocaust survivors in New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. Media, PA: Author. Funding for this study was provided by UJA-Federation of New York
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STUDENT AFFAIRS ANNUAL REPORT: GOALS STATED FOR 2014-2015 Goal 1: Increase Student Affairs engagement, outreach, and service • Evaluate current levels of communication with prospective, accepted and enrolled students and their engagement in programming and other campus activities. Apply findings to develop communication plans for all Student Affairs units • Increase Health Center utilization by 20%. • Continue early communication outreach and recruiting efforts to increase overall student-athlete rosters by 20%. • Develop partnerships with at least 3 community organizations to enhance referrals for students, to expand opportunities for participation in on campus programming and to highlight student success • Continue to build social media presence and explore new ways to communicate with students regarding programs and services Goal 2: Enhance Student Affairs programs and services to positively impact student retention, graduation and success. • Design and implement at least 4 small group experiences for students with the Dean of Student Services. • Provide at least 2 opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and build their identities as student leaders. • Create a peer advisory group by December 15, 2014 to aid in educating the student body about the top diagnoses in the Health and Wellness Center and to assist educational health programs offered in collaboration with Campus Housing and Residence Life • Investigate an Alternative Winter Break (AWB) in the DC area with facilitation from the Campus Ministry student intern for service • Institute mandatory study tables during fall, winter and spring seasons to improve overall academic performance of student-athletes to maintain a minimum of a 3.0 overall average • Student Affairs staff will collaborate to present at least 4 educational programs (at least 2 per semester) open and advertised to all students. Goal 3: Enhance Data Collection and Assessment • Conduct an assessment of on campus residents to gather feedback on strengths and areas of improvement in the quality of life for residential students to contribute to changes in programming or services that contribute to an increase in the retention of students living on campus from fall 2014 to spring 2015 by 2.5% and from spring 2015 to fall 2015 by 10%. • Enhance data collection and analysis of student involvement and engagement in Student Activities, Campus Traditions, and Athletics events. • Establish a Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) – two athletes per team who will all meet twice a semester with Assistant Director to provide direct feedback on initiatives, athlete experience and service projects. 77
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Innovative Ideas for Targeted Advising Campaigns Student Populations Targeted in Previous SSC Campaigns Campaign Example Filters Action At-risk students that may need to switch majors Risk: High risk Credits Earned: 30-45 Encourage students to evaluate their academic performance and consider a major change Undeclared students above a certain credit threshold Major: Undeclared, Pre-major Credits Earned: At least 30, 45, or 60 credits (depending on the institution) Help students select the appropriate major and declare as soon as possible High-performing students not currently enrolled in coursework Cumulative GPA: Over 3.00 Term Enrollment: Currently not enrolled Figure out why students are not enrolled and get them back into classes Seniors with excessive credits Student Classification: Senior Credits Earned: At least 120 Help students determine what requirements they still need to fulfill to graduate and how to fulfill them quickly Pre-majors that are at risk of not meeting selective admissions requirements Exact filters will vary by major Possible Pre-Majors: PreNursing, Pre-Engineering, PreBusiness Encourage students to prepare a “Plan B” and seek academic support to improve performance Students close to graduating that may need additional assistance Credits Earned: At least 90 Risk: Medium risk or high risk Connect students with the resources they need to finish out their degrees Students who may not have been advised recently (for institutions that use student statuses Student Status: “No action taken” Check in on students that the platform suggests may not have been advised recently “Stop outs” that could return and graduate easily Term Enrollment: Currently not enrolled Risk: Low risk Credits Earned: At least 90 Motivate students to re-enroll and complete their degrees Potential recruits for the honors program Term Enrollment: Currently enrolled Risk: Low risk # of Notifications: Less than 2 Cumulative GPA: Over 3.70 Discuss strong academic performance and potential enrollment in the honors program High-performing students for recruitment to a particular major Term Enrollment: Currently enrolled Risk: Low risk Major: Undeclared Ensure high-performing students know they are capable of taking on challenging majors frequently) If you have other ideas for targeted advising campaigns, send them to your SSC consultant! ©2014 The Advisory Board Company • eab.com 5
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3. Program Overview Required Courses • IDS 306 IS Analysis • IDS 315 Bus. Applications Programming • IDS 380 Data Mgmt Sys • IDS 396W Reporting Techniques for Bus. • IDS 406 IS Design • IDS 483 Networks & Data Communications • IDS 492 Mgmt of IS Elective (select two or more) • IDS 301 Statistics • IDS 375 IS Technology • IDS 460 Project Mgmt • IDS 481 E-business/ Web Development • IDS 482 IT Projects • IDS 498 Independent Study • IDS 515 Adv. Programming • IDS 520 Java Programming
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Strategic Goal 8: Service to Students and the Community NEW GOAL 2020: ORIGINAL Goal 2010: • • • Trinity will extend its educational and service talent to children, families and adults in neighborhoods, schools, civic organizations and other locations in the District of Columbia and the Washington Region. • Trinity will provide vital support services to students, faculty and staff in the campus community, as well as to neighbors and residents of D.C. and the larger Washington community. • Student and Campus Services: Trinity will provide a robust range of services for all campus populations. Each service department and program will provide an annual plan with service goals and objectives, resources required and an assessment plan, including: Through the Trinity Center for Women and Girls in Sports, Trinity will continue to offer wellness, fitness, recreational, educational and athletics programs and services to the larger Washington community as well as to the campus community; the annual plan for the Trinity Center includes measurable goals for these services; For the campus community, Trinity will create annual plans with measurable goals for service delivery and effectiveness, and customer satisfaction, in these areas for all schools: – – – – Academic Support Services, Health Services, Campus Ministry, Residence Life Student Government , Student Activities Enrollment Services Food Service, Bookstore, Facilities Services – – – – Academic Support Services, Health Services, Campus Ministry, Residence Life Student Government, Student Activities Enrollment Services Operations: Food Service, Bookstore, Facilities Services, Campus Safety • Trinity Center: Through the Trinity Center for Women and Girls in Sports, Trinity will continue to offer wellness, fitness, recreational, educational and athletics programs and services to the larger Washington community as well as to the campus community; the annual plan for the Trinity Center includes measurable goals for these services; • Community Service: Trinity continues to expand its outreach to the D.C. and Washington regional community through community service projects, clinical service, and partnerships. Each of these components will have a specific plan. 30
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