REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Work Activities Custom A B C COTS A B 1. Software Project Management and Quality Planning FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE 2. Software Risk Management FULL 3. Software Configuration Mgmt FULL 4. Procurement & Vendor Mgmt FULL 5. Software Requirements Identification and Management FULL 6. Software Design & Implementation FULL 7. Software Safety Design FULL 8. Verification & Validation FULL FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL GRADE FULL FULL FULL FULL NA FULL FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE FULL C GRADE GRADE FULL FULL GRADE FULL FULL FULL NA FULL NA GRADE GRADE GRADE 12
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The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The 2.0 Graduation Policy Want to graduate? First, You Must Apply For Graduation. Pick up the “Intent to Graduate” form in the Office of Admissions/Records and submit it by the deadline below: Semester Month of Graduation Intent Form Due Summer Graduation August July 1 Fall Graduation December October 1 Spring Graduation May February There is no computer in the sky that automatically knows you have completed all your coursework since programs of study change from year to year. Secondly, there are several requirements for graduation. One that we’d like for you to especially be aware of is the 2.0 Graduation Policy. You must have successfully completed all required courses for the Associate and/or Certificate desired and have the required minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Further, you must have taken at least 16 hours of academic coursework at IVCC to graduate with an Associate Degree from IVCC, and/or you must have completed at IVCC at least 25% of the coursework required of your certificate program to graduate from IVCC. In doubt about CGPA? See the “Your GPA section” of this orientation! back | home | next
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Academic Program Options What educational options are available at IVCC? Okay, now that you know how to get started here at IVCC, what about academic program options? At IVCC, you can choose from five different degrees and a variety of certificate programs. If you want to transfer to a four-year college or university, you will pursue either an Associate in Arts (A. A.) degree, an Associate in Science (A. S.) degree, or an Associate in Engineering Science (A. E. S.) degree. These three degrees are called transfer degrees. If you want to learn a professional skill that will result in immediate employment after IVCC, you will pursue either an Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.) degree or a certificate program. Another degree option available to you is the Associate in General Studies (A. G. S.) degree. This degree is individualized to meet the needs and interests of the student. It allows for the combination of both transfer and career courses. While not intended to be a transfer degree, the A. G. S. degree recognizes completion of two years of college. back | home | next
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Innovative Ideas for Targeted Advising Campaigns Student Populations Targeted in Previous SSC Campaigns Campaign Example Filters Action At-risk students that may need to switch majors Risk: High risk Credits Earned: 30-45 Encourage students to evaluate their academic performance and consider a major change Undeclared students above a certain credit threshold Major: Undeclared, Pre-major Credits Earned: At least 30, 45, or 60 credits (depending on the institution) Help students select the appropriate major and declare as soon as possible High-performing students not currently enrolled in coursework Cumulative GPA: Over 3.00 Term Enrollment: Currently not enrolled Figure out why students are not enrolled and get them back into classes Seniors with excessive credits Student Classification: Senior Credits Earned: At least 120 Help students determine what requirements they still need to fulfill to graduate and how to fulfill them quickly Pre-majors that are at risk of not meeting selective admissions requirements Exact filters will vary by major Possible Pre-Majors: PreNursing, Pre-Engineering, PreBusiness Encourage students to prepare a “Plan B” and seek academic support to improve performance Students close to graduating that may need additional assistance Credits Earned: At least 90 Risk: Medium risk or high risk Connect students with the resources they need to finish out their degrees Students who may not have been advised recently (for institutions that use student statuses Student Status: “No action taken” Check in on students that the platform suggests may not have been advised recently “Stop outs” that could return and graduate easily Term Enrollment: Currently not enrolled Risk: Low risk Credits Earned: At least 90 Motivate students to re-enroll and complete their degrees Potential recruits for the honors program Term Enrollment: Currently enrolled Risk: Low risk # of Notifications: Less than 2 Cumulative GPA: Over 3.70 Discuss strong academic performance and potential enrollment in the honors program High-performing students for recruitment to a particular major Term Enrollment: Currently enrolled Risk: Low risk Major: Undeclared Ensure high-performing students know they are capable of taking on challenging majors frequently) If you have other ideas for targeted advising campaigns, send them to your SSC consultant! ©2014 The Advisory Board Company • eab.com 5
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Frequently Asked Questions Q: Are there tutors available if I have trouble with any of my classes, especially math? A: Yes, the Peer Tutoring Center, located in CRC-D, offers free tutoring to all IVCC students in almost all subject areas. Call 815-2240479 to arrange your tutoring session. Q: How can I be certain my classes will transfer to a four-year college or university? A: Our Counselors can assist you with selecting the right courses. The Counseling Center, located in E-201, also has transfer guide sheets from most Illinois four-year colleges. Q: Do I buy or rent my textbooks? A: You can buy textbooks from the IVCC bookstore located in the Main Building C, to the right of the Lobby. Some textbooks may be available for rental. Q: I have a disability. Where can I receive reasonable accommodations? A: The Disability Services Office at IVCC assists students in achieving success in their college classes. At IVCC, professional staff and faculty, along with many academic and adaptive support services, are available to help students meet their individual special needs. For more information, contact Special Needs Coordinators: Tina Hardy 815-224-0284 or Judy Mika 815-224-0350. back | home | next
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Frequently Asked Questions  I chose a friend to room with me but they have not yet confirmed my request.  Make sure to contact your friend beforehand and agree in advance that you would like to room together. If you find your friend is not responding, you may want to remove them as a roommate request to better your chances of getting a room.  Who do I contact if I have further questions about the process?  HRL professional staff will be available in their office in your Residence Hall as well as in 68 Duffy Hall.  You can also find us on Facebook or Twitter at SetonHallHRL.  What if I am not available to log on during my lottery time?  There is no proxy process. You will have to sign in to your lottery as soon as possible after your lottery time. The lottery process will have continued and room availability will become more limited however as long as the lottery is open, you may still choose from what is left. The housing lottery times are listed in your Housing Profile along with your specific lottery time.  If my roommate already pulled me in to the other bed in their room, do I have to do anything during my lottery time?  No, as long as the assignment shows up on your Housing Profile and registered for full-time credits for Fall 2017, you are all set for a room assignment.  Once I pick my room online, am I all set?  Yes. Please make sure your balance is paid, you are registered as a full-time student (12 credits or more unless you are graduating),and there are no holds on your account. We will cancel your housing if you are not registered by the end of the registration period or if you have a balance on your account. Please remember Fall bill must be paid in accordance with bursar deadlines.  What happens if no beds are available at my lottery time?  We accepted as many deposits as we have beds to fill but if we wind up gender-heavy towards a particular gender, we may not have rooms right away towards the end of room lotteries. As long as you are registered for a full-time Fall 2017 course load, you will be assigned to the Wait List in order of lottery number.  What is the difference between Beds 1 & 2?  This is just the system’s way of telling you and your roommate apart. There really is no difference. Just be careful when selecting a suite that your roommates are assigned in the right spaces.
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Level II Placements 1st Rotation 2nd Rotation FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Choice FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st 0 Student 2- 1st FW Site 2 1 Student 2- 1st Choice Student 3- 2nd Choice Student 4- 3rd Choice 1 Student A- 1st Student B- 2nd choice Student C- 3rd Choice FW Site 3 1 Student 4- 1st Choice Student 5- 1st Choice Student 6- 1st Choice Student 7-2nd Choice Student 8- 2nd Choice Student 9- 3rd Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Student 3- 1st Student 4- 1st Student 5- 1st Student 6- 1st Student 7- 1st FW Site 4 0 Student 10- 1st 0 Student 11- 1st Choice FW Site 5 1 No Student 1 No Student FW Site 6 1 No Student 1 Student 11- 1st Student 12- 1st Lake Charles MC with free housing
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FIGURE 7–3 Suggested Supplementary Questions for Interviewing Applicants 1. 2. 7–15 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. How did you choose this line of work? What did you enjoy most about your last job? What did you like least about your last job? What has been your greatest frustration or disappointment in your present job? Why? What are some of the pluses and minuses of your last job? What were the circumstances surrounding your leaving your last job? Did you give notice? Why should we be hiring you? What do you expect from this employer? What are three things you will not do in your next job? What would your last supervisor say your three weaknesses are? What are your major strengths? How can your supervisor best help you obtain your goals? How did your supervisor rate your job performance? In what ways would you change your last supervisor? What are your career goals during the next 1–3 years? 5–10 years? How will working for this company help you reach those goals? What did you do the last time you received instructions with which you disagreed? What are some things about which you and your supervisor disagreed? What did you do? Which do you prefer, working alone or working with groups? What motivated you to do better at your last job? Do you consider your progress in that job representative of your ability? Why? Do you have any questions about the duties of the job for which you have applied? Can you perform the essential functions of the job for which you have applied? © 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. Source: Reprinted from www.HR.BLR.com with permission of the publisher Business and Legal Reports, Inc. 141 Mill Rock Road East, Old Saybrook, CT © 2004.
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Test Your Knowledge In order to be considered a full-time student at IVCC, you need to be enrolled in at least: A. 9 credit hours B. 12 credit hours C. 11 credit hours D. 14 credit hours
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Basic F-1 Immigration Regulations When you are admitted into the U.S. in an F-1 student status, you are expected to have one main purpose for entry: enrollment in and completion of an educational program, to which you have been admitted. While there are many rules and regulations that govern the stay of F-1 students in the U.S., the most essential rules that you need to follow to maintain your F-1 status are: • You are required to register for a full-time load of classes during each term. While in Pathways, we will register you for all classes and will ensure that you are enrolled full-time. • You are required to attend all of your classes. Simply being registered for classes is not sufficient to maintain a lawful F-1 status in the U.S. You are actually required to attend all of your classes and are required to comply with attendance policy that each of your instructors has. If you have a personal reason that makes it impossible for you to continue to attend some or all of your classes, you must contact the Global Pathways Office immediately or else you might be required to leave the U.S., should you stop attending classes. • You should never start working without first consulting with your immigration advisor. While in Pathways, please contact the Global Pathways office directly with any questions you have about your F-1 employment benefits. Please note that it is the policy of the Pathways program that students should not pursue any kind of employment until they complete Pathways. After Pathways, you will be eligible to look for an on-campus job and will also qualify for off-campus employment in your major after 2 consecutive semesters of being enrolled full-time after Pathways.
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