C1 01TBM Three blind mice 3 SO1 35SSS Sing a song of sixpence .18 .14 02TLP This little pig went to market DO1 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 07OMH Old Mother Hubbard 04LMM Little Miss Muffet 30HDD Hey diddle diddle 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 08JSC Jack Sprat could eat no fat C2 ffa=39LCS 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 05HDS Humpty Dumpty C11 12OWF There came an old woman from France 11OMM One misty moisty morning 01TBM Three blind mice 13RRS A robin and a robins son 15PCD Great A. little a 02TLP This little pig went to market 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 16PPG Flour of England 22HLH I had a little husband 04LMM Little Miss Muffet 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor 28BBB Baa baa black sheep 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon 37MBB Here we go round mulberry bush 13RRS A robin and a robins son 25WOW There was an old woman 38YLS If I had as much money as I could tell 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 26SBS Sleep baby sleep 39LCS A little cock sparrow 16PPG Flour of England 27CBC Cry baby cry 41OKC Old King Cole 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor C21 ffa=21LAU 29LFW When little Fred went to bed 42BBC Bat bat, come under my hat 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe 05HDS Humpty Dumpty 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 50LJH Little Jack Horner 11OMM One misty moisty morning 25WOW There was an old woman 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark .26 15PCD Great A. little a 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood DO4 .46 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 45BBB Bye baby bunting .19 22HLH I had a little husband 28BBB Baa baa black sheep 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 46TTP Tom Tom the pipers son 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn SO8 41OKC Old King Cole 37MBB Here we go round mulberry 46TTP Tom Tom the pipers son 49WLG There was a little girl 50LJH Little Jack Horner 38YLS If I had as much money SO9 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn .28 2.2 SO2 08JSC Jack Sprat 42BBC Bat bat, come under my hat 49WLG There was a little girl 39LCS A little cock sparrow C12 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe .42 C111 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near C211 ffa=37 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John .41 12OWF There came old woman France 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 26SBS Sleep baby sleep 05HDS Humpty Dumpty 2 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 27CBC Cry baby cry 11OMM One misty moisty morning 13RRS A robin and a robins son .31 1.3 29LFW When little Fred went to bed 15PCD Great A. little a 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 45BBB Bye baby bunting 22HLH I had a little husband 16PPG Flour of England SO15 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 1.53 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 37MBB Here we go round mulberry .42 29LFW When little Fred went bed 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon SO3 38YLS If I had as much money 25WOW There was an old woman 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe C121 ffa=29 46TTP Tom Tom pipers DO3 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle SO10 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near 01TBM Three blind mice SO11 42BBC Bat bat, come undert 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 26SBS Sleep baby sleep DO2 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood 27CBC Cry baby cry .38 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 45BBB Bye baby bunting 02TLP This little pig C2111 ffa=15 SO14 49WLG There was a little girl .1.6 04LMM Little Miss Muffet .36 05HDS Humpty Dumpty C1111 12OWF The came ol woman France 15PCD Great A. little a 1.8 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 22HLH I had a little husband 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse SO4 13RRS A robin and a robins son 38YLS If I had as much money 16PPG Flour of England 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay TO1 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon SO12 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 14ASO If all the seas 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 11OMM One misty moisty SO13 25WOW There was an old woman 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 44HLH The hart he loves 37MBB Here we go rnd mulberry 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 49WLG There was a little girl C2111 seems to be lullabys? no gaps C2111 seems to focus on .3 1.3 SO5 C11111 extremes? (big and small) 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 13RRS A robin and TO2 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 16PPG Flour of England 23MTB How many miles to Babylon 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair Notes: 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn In text mining, just about any document is eventually going to be an 49WLG There was a little girl C111111 SO6 outlier due to the fact that we are projecting high dimension (44 here) onto 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 16PPG Flour of England SO7 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling dimension=1. Thus the ffa will almost always be an outlier in LAvgffa. 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle MG44d60w A-FFA dendogram
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A. S. Degree - 9 credit hours of Communications - 3 credit hours of Mathematics -10 credit hours of Life and Physical Science - 9 credit hours of Humanities and Fine Arts - 6 credit hours of Global Appreciation (can be fulfilled by completing appropriate courses in other general education categories) - 9 credit hours of Social and Behavioral Sciences - 2 credit hours of Health and Wellness A.A. Degree - 9 credit hours of Communications - 3 credit hours of Mathematics - 7 credit hours of Life and Physical Science - 12 credit hours of Humanities and Fine Arts - 6 credit hours of Global Appreciation (can be fulfilled by completing appropriate courses in other general education categories) - 9 credit hours of Social and Behavioral Sciences - 2 credit hours of Health and Wellness back | home | next
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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A COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS Melissa Pullman, PhD1, Wendy Zeitlin, PhD2, Charles Auerbach, PhD1 , Kelly Klinger, BA2 Yeshiva University, New York, New York; 2Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey 1 Discussion Unclosable Gaps: Two gaps were identified that would be unable to be closed by traditional resources alone, as they deal with structural problems in society-at-large. Congregate care – skilled nursing facilities and/or assisted living could be helpful for some survivors if there could be a community of survivors that could live together AND appropriate services (including home care for those who live in assisted living facilities) existed. Because this population had been traumatized by institutionalization previously, congregate care generally designed for the elderly, is considered undesirable. As such, without specialized services, it is highly desirable for survivors to remain in their homes in situations which differ from those of other elderly. To date, no such facility has been built in the US, and it is anticipated that this is a need that is not feasible to meet. In-home psychiatric care – while numerous research participants indicated that this service is needed, there are an insufficient number of psychiatrists nationwide, and the need for psychiatric care, in general, is growing for all populations. It is not likely that this gap will be closed any time as the number of psychiatrists retiring continues to rise, and the number of residency spots for new psychiatrists is held steady. www.eposterboards.com Discussion (cont.) Existing services: Professional Social Work Services - includes services such as case management, clinical social work, mental health counseling, friendly visiting, financial guardianship, and social programs. In short, social work services include all services that would include direct services provided by licensed social workers and those overseen by licensed social workers. Services such as social work/case management are not adequately funded currently. One participant stated the need for these services clearly: The social worker helps them [survivors] to get hooked up to services they are resistant to or helps them through the barriers. They help them think about what their needs are. It is hard to get through the door and win their trust. On- on-one service is very expensive. Home Care - includes services such as housekeeping, companionship, in-home nursing and home health aides. There was unanimous agreement that one of the most import factors in preserving the dignity of survivors is the ability to remain at home. An important theme, more knowledge about survivors to the home health aides, emerged from the data. Specialized home care services were addressed by one participant: Aides are trained to understand the history and special needs of the survivors. For example, even knowing that chemical smells can trigger memories for the client. Transportation - includes door-to-door transportation to both medical appointments and social events designed for Holocaust survivors. While underfunded, participants agreed that this service was needed to help survivors remain in their homes and maintain their dignity: Survivors need transportation, otherwise they can’t access the city services. Food support - includes Meals-On-Wheels and additional supplementary support for food, including grocery store vouchers. Having abundant food was an important issue to survivors, who often hoard because they are afraid food will run out. One provider commented on the importance of food in keeping survivors in the community. Another noted the needed for Meals-On-Wheels: Food stamps don’t fulfill food for a whole week; some can’t go to the grocery store, so they need already made meals. Emergency Cash Assistance - The German government currently provides a limited amount of emergency cash to survivors for one-time expenses. This is similar to a small business’s “petty cash.” This is currently used for a wide range of expenses, some of which are actually long-term needs. Examples of how emergency cash is used includes: rent, utility bill, durable medical equipment such as hearing aids or hospital beds, and dental bills. One interviewee noted how this is often insufficient: It is not a generous enough cap for the survivors to maintain their dignity.… basic needs aren’t even met, capped at $2,500 is too little. Sometimes they are in the middle of their medical/dental work and they don’t know what to do when the $2,500 runs out. Conclusion and Implications While it is unlikely that some needs identified in this research will be able to be met in survivors’ lifetimes, many could. While most services identified in this research currently exist, all service providers indicated that inadequate funding make it likely that an increasing number of survivors’ needs will go unmet in the future. The population of Holocaust survivors is aging with the youngest being in their 70s. Research indicates that this population is expected to be reduced by 74% within 15 years (SSRS, 2016); however, the needs of the existing survivors will increase as they age. This will likely put a strain on survivors, their families, and the communities in which they live. Future research should focus on how to best expand and fund services for Holocaust survivors as they continue to age. References Cohen, S. M., Ukeles, J. B., & Miller, R. (2012). Jewish community study of New York: 2011 comprehensive report. New York: UJA Federation of New York. Eriksson, M., Räikkönen, K., & Eriksson, J. G. (2014). Early life stress and later health outcomes—findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(2), 111–116. Keinan-Boker, L., Shasha-Lavsky, H., Eilat-Zanani, S., Edri-Shur, A., & Shasha, S. M. (2015). Chronic health conditions in Jewish Holocaust survivors born during World War II. The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 17(4), 206–212. Meyer, M. H., & Daniele, E. A. (2016). Gerontology: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions [2 volumes]: Changes, Challenges, and Solutions. ABC-CLIO. Mitka, M. (2014). Holocaust survivors’ health needs. JAMA, 311(10), 1005. SSRS. (2016). Gap analysis of services to holocaust survivors in New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. Media, PA: Author. Funding for this study was provided by UJA-Federation of New York
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