The Career Option If I choose a Career Program (A. A. S.) what courses will I be taking? The majority of the courses you’ll take will be related to the Career Program you are pursuing. The A. A. S can be completed in two years of full time study. About 75 percent of the course work required for the A. A. S. is directly in the particular field major or field of study, or very closely related to it. The remaining 25 percent of the course work is in General Education and/or elective courses. More detailed information about the specifics of each Career Program is available in the college catalog and our career guide sheets (available in the Counseling Center). back | home | next
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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SA Strategic Plan reporting example – Counseling Center • The Counseling Center completed a CAS Review and developed a scorecard for implementing recommendations. (1.2) • The Counseling Center partnered with various programs across campus in order to enhance student success. These presentations and program partnerships include but are not limited to: Residence Life; SOAR; Taylor Health and Wellness; Study Away; General Education Program; Student Affairs, and many others. (1.4) • The Counseling Center provided learning opportunities for 4 GAs who apply their counseling and presentation knowledge gained in the classroom to their work in the Counseling Center. (2.1) • The Counseling Center provided a presentation to the Student Affairs Council to demonstrate the learning that occurs by graduate students as they work in the Counseling Center. (2.4) • The Counseling Center staff regularly refer students to many Student Affairs and other University resources. (3.2) • The Counseling Center hired a new counselor who bring a rich experience of diversity. (4.3) • The Counseling Center identified needs for the hiring of a part-time therapist and a full-time therapist, due to increased demands for services, and both positions were filled. (5.1) • The Counseling Center improved the efficiency and effectiveness of serving students and in student file management by implementing Titanium software and by in updating office processes and procedures. (5.3) 4
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CHW Global health elective policy Pediatric and Medicine-Pediatric residents can participate in a single, one month-long pediatric* global health elective if they: • are in good standing with their residency program and are entering their senior year of residency (late PGY-2 or PGY-3 for pediatric residents; PGY-3 or PGY-4 for med-peds residents); • enrolled in the global health track as interns and are on target to complete the annual global health track requirements as outlined by the training program; • have chosen an elective that will ensure daily physician preceptorship, is in a safe environment, and is approved by CHW/MCW residency and MCWAH leadership; and • commit to completion of a patient log and summary of their elective experience. Residents who meet the above criteria should submit their request to participate no later than May 15 th of the academic year preceding the elective to the Global Health Track Directors • Requests should occur earlier than 5/15 if the elective will be in the summer or early fall, as MCWAH forms need to be submitted no later than 4 months prior to the start of the elective • Deadline for submission of MCWAH forms for late fall/winter/spring electives is July 1st of the academic year Residents who wish to participate in a global health elective should be sure to properly share this preference with the pediatric/medicine-pediatric chief residents on the annual master schedule preference list submission • It is recommended to make this a high priority preference in your annual master schedule preference list to maximize the likelihood of receiving a global health eligible elective slot during the appropriate block. Should this policy change, it will be retrospectively applied to all senior residents who enrolled under the policy as interns and met the above requirements. Policy last reviewed by Drs St Clair, Kuzminski, Weisgerber, Toth & Gutzeit 2/2016. *Note: A pediatric global health elective is one that has salary support provided by CHW for the month-long elective. For Medicine-Pediatric residents, they additionally can pursue a salary-supported Froedtert global health elective slot—availability and number of slots may vary annually per the discretion of Froedtert’s leadership.
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