Seismic attribute-assisted interpretation of incised valley fill episodes: A case study of Anadarko Basin Red Fork interval. Yoscel Suarez*, Chesapeake Energy and The University of Oklahoma, USA Kurt J. Marfurt, The University of Oklahoma, USA Mark Falk, Chesapeake Energy, USA Al Warner , Chesapeake Energy, USA Abstract Previous Work Discrimination of valley-fill episodes and their lithology has always posed a challenge for exploration geologists and geophysicists, and the Red Fork sands in the Anadarko Basin do not fall outside of this challenge. The goal of this study is to take a new look at seismic attributes given the considerable well control that has been acquired during the past decade. By using this well understood reservoir as a natural laboratory, we calibrate the response of various attributes to a well-understood incised valley system. The extensive drilling program shows that seismic data has difficulty in distinguishing shale episodes vs. sand episodes, where the ultimate exploration goal is to find productive valley fill sands. In 1998 Lynn Peyton, Rich Bottjer and Greg Partyka published a paper in the Leading Edge describing their use of coherency and spectral decomposition to identify valley fill in the Red Fork interval in the Anadarko Basin. Their work help them identify five valley-fill sequences in order to find optimum reservoir intervals and to reduce exploration risk . Due to the discontinuity of the valley-fill episodes the mapping of such events by using conventional seismic displays is extremely challenging. Figure 3 shows one of the stratigraphic well cross-section presented by Peyton et al where the discontinuities of this complex are evident. Figure 4 shows a seismic profile that parallels the wells cross-section highlighting the same stages. The seismic section is flattened in the Novi. Since original work done in 1998 both seismic attributes and seismic geomorphology have undergone rapid advancement. The findings of this work will be applicable to nearby active areas as well as other intervals in the area that exhibit the same challenges. Using Peyton et al’s (1998) work as a starting point we generated similar displays of conventional seismic profiles and well x-sections that will become the bases of our research efforts. Figure 8 shows the geometry and extents of the different episodes of the Red Fork incised valley system based on well data interpretation and conventional seismic displays. This map will be compared to the different seismic attributes to calibrate their response. Figure 9 (a,b) show couple of well x-sections and their corresponding seismic profiles that supported the valley-fill stages map in Figure 8. Seismic attributes have undergone rapid development since the mid 1990s. In lieu of the horizon-based spectral decomposition based on the discrete Fourier transform, we use volumetric-based spectral decomposition based on matched pursuit and wavelet transforms (e.g. Liu and Marfurt,2007) . Other edge-sensitive attributes include more modern implementations of coherence, long-wavelength Sobel filters, and amplitude gradients. Figure 10 shows a horizon slice at the Red Fork level. Note that on conventional data the channel complex is identifiable. However, the use of seismic attributes may help delineate in more detail the different episodes within the same fluvial system and better define channel geomorphology. We will compare different edge detection algorithms and the advantages and disadvantages that each of them provides to the interpreter. Also, matching pursuit spectral decomposition results will be presented as well as combinations of Relative Acoustic Impedance and semblance that provide helpful information in the interpretation of this dataset. The surveys are located in west central Oklahoma. They were shot by Amoco from 19931996 and later merged into a 136 sq.mi. survey. In 1998, Chesapeake acquired many of Amoco’s Mid-continent properties including those discussed by Peyton et al. (1998). In this study we present alternative seismic attribute-assisted interpretation workflows that show the potential information that each of the geometric and amplitude-based attributes offer to the interpreter when dealing with Red Fork valley-fill episodes in the Anadarko Basin. It is important to mention that one of the biggest challenges of this dataset is the acquisition footprint, which contaminates the data and limits the resolution of some of the seismic attributes. Geological Framework Methodology A Figure 3. Stratigraphic cross-section Red Fork valley –fill complex Figure 4. Seismic profile associated to the prior crosssection. Flattened in the Novi interval By generating horizon slices in the coherency volume they were able to identify and delineate the main geometries of the incised valley (Figure 5). The event used to generated the horizon slice is the Skinner Lime above the Red Fork interval. A’ The Pennsylvanian incised valley sequence associated with the Red Fork interval has, throughout most of its extent, three major events or facies (Phase I, II, and III) which can be differentiated by log signatures, production characteristics, and gross geometry. Two additional events (Phase IV and V) are present in the eastern and northeastern headward portion of the valley, also recognizable by log signature and gross geometry. Phase II Phase III Phase V Figure 8. Red Fork incised valley geometries and valley-fill episodes The multi phase events of the Upper Red Fork Valley system were most likely caused by repeated sea level changes resulting from Pennsylvania glacial events that were probably related to the Milankovitch astronomical cycles including the changing tilt of the earth’s axis and eccentricity of the earth’s elliptical orbit. Phase I is the earliest valley event and Phase II generally has a much wider represents the narrow, initial downcutting of the valley sequence. Where present (a considerable portion of Phase I has been eroded by later events), the rocks are generally poorly correlative shales, silts, and tight sandstones overlying a basal “lag” deposit. areal distribution (up to four miles) with a variety of valley fill facies deposited which record a period of valley widening and maturation. Logs over Phase II rocks illustrate a classic fining upward pattern and shale resistivities of 10 or more ohms. Phase III rocks record the last major incisement within the valley and occur within a narrow (0.25-.05 mile wide) steep walled system that is correlative for 70 miles. This rejuvenated channel actually represents the final position of the Phase II river before base level was lowered and renewed downcutting began. Phase III reservoirs are primarily thick, blocky, porous sands at the base of the sequence that have been backfilled, reworked, and overlain by low resistivity marine shales deposited by a major transgression which drowned the valley sequence. Figure 5. Coherency horizon slice at the Red Fork level Phase V the last event before the transgression that deposited the Pink. It’s primary significance is that it either partially or completely eroded much of the Phase III Valley event. Phase V rocks are poorly developed, non productive sand and shales which also have a characteristic log signature. end of Phase III marine shale deposition. Phase IV rocks are characterized by thin, tight, interbedded sands and shales with a coal or coaly shale near the base. This facies is interpreted as an elongated lagoon/ coal swamp or possibly bay head delta as it often extends beyond the confines of the deeper valley. The Induction log signature is a very distinct “serrated” pattern with a “hot” gamma ray near the base identifying the coal or coaly shale. Pink Lime In their workflow they also estimated the spectral decomposition. They found that the 36 Hz component best represented the different valley-fill stages (Figure 6). By combining the well-data with the information from the seismic attributes they were able to delineate the extents of the different valley –fill episodes (Figure 7) and generate and integrated interpretation of the system. Lower Red Fork II III II Middle Red Fork V a) Figure 9. a) Red Fork stratigraphic cross-section. b) Seismic profile showing the stratigraphic interpretation derived from the well data Phase IV records a modest regression at the The geological framework summary is courtesy of Al Warner. Senior Geologist at Chesapeake Energy Figure 10. Conventional seismic horizon slice at the Red Fork level. The channel discernible although signal/noise ratio is affected by acquisition footprint Figure 6. Spectral decomposition (36 Hz) horizon slice at the Red Fork level Figure 7. Spectral decomposition (36 Hz) horizon slice at the Red Fork level with interpretation. III b) II V
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createconfigs script in src/mpp-mpred-3.2.0/p95/mu11 #!/bin/bash for g in .1 .2 .4 .7 .9 do sed -i -e "s/dMNsdsThr=[^ ]*/dMNsdsThr=$g/" t.config for h in .1 .2 .4 .7 .9 do sed -i -e "s/dMNsdsExp=[^ ]*/dMNsdsExp=$h/" t.config cp t.config configs/a$g$h.config done done creates in src.mpp-mpred-3.2.0/p95/mu11/configs: -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.1.1.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.1.2.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.1.4.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.1.7.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.1.9.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.2.1.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.2.2.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.2.4.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.2.7.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:11 a.2.9.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.4.1.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.4.2.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.4.4.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.4.7.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.4.9.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.7.1.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.7.2.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.7.4.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.7.7.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.7.9.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.9.1.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.9.2.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.9.4.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.9.7.config -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov 3 10:12 a.9.9.config submit in src/mpp-mpred-3.2.0 produces here #!/bin/bash for g in .1 .2 .4 .7 .9 do for h in .1 .2 .4 .7 .9 do ./mpp-submit -S -i Data/p95test.txt -c p95/mu11/configs a$g$h.out -t .05 -d ./p95/mu11 done done -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.1.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.2.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.4.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.7.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3625 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.9.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.2.1.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:15 a.2.2.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.2.4.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.2.7.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.2.9.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.4.1.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3625 Nov 3 10:16 a.4.2.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.4.4.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:16 a.4.7.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.4.9.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.7.1.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3625 Nov 3 10:17 a.7.2.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.7.4.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.7.7.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.7.9.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:17 a.9.1.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:18 a.9.2.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:18 a.9.4.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3625 Nov 3 10:18 a.9.7.out -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 3626 Nov 3 10:18 a.9.9.out which I then copy to src/mpp-mpred-3.2.0/dotouts.
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submit script run in scr/mpp-mpred-3.2.0 also produces these subdirs in mpp-mpred-3.2.0 : drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty drwxr-xr-x 2 perrizo faculty 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 4096 Nov 3 10:15 a.1.1 3 10:15 a.1.2 3 10:15 a.1.4 3 10:15 a.1.7 3 10:15 a.1.9 3 10:15 a.2.1 3 10:15 a.2.2 3 10:16 a.2.4 3 10:16 a.2.7 3 10:16 a.2.9 3 10:16 a.4.1 3 10:16 a.4.2 3 10:16 a.4.4 3 10:16 a.4.7 3 10:17 a.4.9 3 10:17 a.7.1 3 10:17 a.7.2 3 10:17 a.7.4 3 10:17 a.7.7 3 10:17 a.7.9 3 10:17 a.9.1 3 10:18 a.9.2 3 10:18 a.9.4 3 10:18 a.9.7 3 10:18 a.9.9 p95test.txt.rmse Movie: 12641: 0: Answer: 1 Prediction: 1.22 Error: 0.04840 1: Answer: 4 Prediction: 3.65 Error: 0.12250 2: Answer: 2 Prediction: 2.55 Error: 0.30250 3: Answer: 4 Prediction: 4.04 Error: 0.00160 4: Answer: 2 Prediction: 1.85 Error: 0.02250 Sum: 0.49750 Total: 5 RMSE: 0.315436 Running RMSE: 0.315436 / 5 predictions Movie: 12502: 0: Answer: 4 Prediction: 4.71 Error: 0.50410 1: Answer: 5 Prediction: 3.54 Error: 2.13160 2: Answer: 5 Prediction: 3.87 Error: 1.27690 3: Answer: 3 Prediction: 3.33 Error: 0.10890 4: Answer: 2 Prediction: 2.97 Error: 0.94090 Sum: 4.96240 Total: 5 RMSE: 0.996233 Running RMSE: 0.738911 / 10 predictions .. . Movie: 10811: 0: Answer: 5 Prediction: 4.05 Error: 0.90250 1: Answer: 3 Prediction: 3.49 Error: 0.24010 2: Answer: 4 Prediction: 3.94 Error: 0.00360 3: Answer: 3 Prediction: 3.39 Error: 0.15210 Sum: 1.29830 Total: 4 RMSE: 0.569715 Running RMSE: 0.964397 / 743 predictions Movie: 12069: 0: Answer: 4 Prediction: 3.20 Error: 0.64000 1: Answer: 3 Prediction: 3.48 Error: 0.23040 Sum: 0.87040 Total: 2 RMSE: 0.659697 Prediction summary: Sum: 691.90610 Total: 745 RMSE: 0.963708 and e.g., a.9.9 contains: -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 7441 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 5191 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 1808 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 1465 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 688 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 4330 Nov -rw-r--r-- 1 perrizo faculty 46147Nov 3 10:17 a.9.9.config 3 10:18 hi-a.9.9.txt 3 10:18 hi-a.9.9.txt.answers 3 10:18 lo-a.9.9.txt 3 10:18 lo-a.9.9.txt.answers 3 10:18 p95test.txt.predictions 3 10:18 p95test.txt.rmse .predictions 12641: 1.22 3.65 2.55 4.04 1.85 12502: 4.71 3.54 3.87 3.33 2.97 .. . 10811: 4.05 3.49 3.94 3.39 12069: 3.20 3.48
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Not All 20 Point Fonts Are Equal 20  A - Can You Read B - Can You Read C - Can You Read D - Can You Read E - Can You Read F - Can You Read G - Can You Read H - Can You Read I - Can You Read 16  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 14  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 12  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read My Students Tell Me That They Like The Readability Of Ariel Font I never use fonts smaller than 20 point for lecture.
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Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Getting Started – First things first! How do you become a student at Illinois Valley Community College? 1. Submit an application for admission. If you have not submitted an application, you can begin the process on-line. Go to http://www.ivcc.edu/apply/ for more information. 2. Complete placement testing. If your ACT English sub score is a 21 or higher, ACT Reading sub score is a 23 or higher and ACT Math sub score is a 22 or higher you are exempt from placement testing. Scores of 24 and 26 in Math will also allow for placement in higher levels of math coursework. If your scores are less than indicated above you may be required to take all or portions of the IVCC placement tests. Individuals will also need to complete a Basic Computer Skills Assessment when taking Placement Tests. For more information go to http://www.ivcc.edu/assessment/placement_test.html. 3. Apply for Financial Aid. 4. Complete this orientation. 5. Meet with a Counselor to schedule your classes and register. Now on with the orientation! back | home | next
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Frequently Asked Questions Q: Are there tutors available if I have trouble with any of my classes, especially math? A: Yes, the Peer Tutoring Center, located in CRC-D, offers free tutoring to all IVCC students in almost all subject areas. Call 815-2240479 to arrange your tutoring session. Q: How can I be certain my classes will transfer to a four-year college or university? A: Our Counselors can assist you with selecting the right courses. The Counseling Center, located in E-201, also has transfer guide sheets from most Illinois four-year colleges. Q: Do I buy or rent my textbooks? A: You can buy textbooks from the IVCC bookstore located in the Main Building C, to the right of the Lobby. Some textbooks may be available for rental. Q: I have a disability. Where can I receive reasonable accommodations? A: The Disability Services Office at IVCC assists students in achieving success in their college classes. At IVCC, professional staff and faculty, along with many academic and adaptive support services, are available to help students meet their individual special needs. For more information, contact Special Needs Coordinators: Tina Hardy 815-224-0284 or Judy Mika 815-224-0350. back | home | next
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