Answer #include struct Book { char title[50]; char author[50]; char subject[100]; int book_id; }; void printBook( struct Book *book ) { /* function declaration */ void printBook( struct Book *book ); printf( printf( printf( printf( int main( ) { struct Book Book1; struct Book Book2; /* Declare Book1 of type Book */ /* Declare Book2 of type Book */ "Book "Book "Book "Book title : %s\n", book->title); author : %s\n", book->author); subject : %s\n", book->subject); book_id : %d\n\n", book->book_id); } /* book 1 specification */ strcpy( Book1.title, "C Programming"); strcpy( Book1.author, "Nuha Ali"); strcpy( Book1.subject, "C Programming Tutorial"); Book1.book_id = 6495407; /* book 2 specification */ strcpy( Book2.title, "Telecom Billing"); strcpy( Book2.author, "Zara Ali"); strcpy( Book2.subject, "Telecom Billing Tutorial"); Book2.book_id = 6495700; /* print Book1 info by passing address of Book1 */ printBook( &Book1 ); /* print Book2 info by passing address of Book2 */ printBook( &Book2 ); return 0; } Copyright © 2017 by Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC an Ascend Learning Company
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Overview of Lecture Notes  Introduction to Game Theory: Lecture 1, book 1  Non-cooperative Games: Lecture 1, Chapter 3, book 1  Bayesian Games: Lecture 2, Chapter 4, book 1  Differential Games: Lecture 3, Chapter 5, book 1  Evolutionary Games: Lecture 4, Chapter 6, book 1  Cooperative Games: Lecture 5, Chapter 7, book 1  Auction Theory: Lecture 6, Chapter 8, book 1  Matching Game: Lecture 7, Chapter 2, book 2  Contract Theory, Lecture 8, Chapter 3, book 2  Learning in Game, Lecture 9, Chapter 6, book 2  Stochastic Game, Lecture 10, Chapter 4, book 2  Game with Bounded Rationality, Lecture 11, Chapter 5, book 2  Equilibrium Programming with Equilibrium Constraint, Lecture 12, Chapter 7, book 2  Zero Determinant Strategy, Lecture 13, Chapter 8, book 2  Mean Field Game, Lecture 14, UCLA course, book 2  Network Economy, Lecture 15, Dr. Jianwei Huang, book 2 [2]
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03/18/19 18:01 9 Example 0 0849350808 0 0 0 Bhavani Thuraisingham 0 CRC Press 0 2001 0 0849300371 0 0
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Overview of Lecture Notes  Introduction to Game Theory: Lecture 1, book 1  Non-cooperative Games: Lecture 1, Chapter 3, book 1  Bayesian Games: Lecture 2, Chapter 4, book 1  Differential Games: Lecture 3, Chapter 5, book 1  Evolutionary Games: Lecture 4, Chapter 6, book 1  Cooperative Games: Lecture 5, Chapter 7, book 1  Auction Theory: Lecture 6, Chapter 8, book 1  Matching Game: Lecture 7, Chapter 2, book 2  Contract Theory, Lecture 8, Chapter 3, book 2  Learning in Game, Lecture 9, Chapter 6, book 2  Stochastic Game, Lecture 10, Chapter 4, book 2  Game with Bounded Rationality, Lecture 11, Chapter 5, book 2  Equilibrium Programming with Equilibrium Constraint, Lecture 12, Chapter 7, book 2  Zero Determinant Strategy, Lecture 13, Chapter 8, book 2  Mean Field Game, Lecture 14, UCLA course, book 2  Network Economy, Lecture 15, Dr. Jianwei Huang, book 2 [2]
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Question - books.c • Write a program to define a structure called Book. The Book structure should have a title, author, subject and a book id as attributes. • Write a function printBook(struct Books *book) that print book details: • E.g Book title : C Programming Book author : Sam Anders Book subject : C Programming [email protected] 117 ~/CS310/ch02]$ ./books Book book_id : 6495407 Book title : C Programming • In theBook main function declare and initialize 2 books and print author : Sam Anders Book subject : C Programming Tutorial their details: Book book_id : 6495407 Book Book Book Book title : Telecom Billing author : Sara Smith subject : Telecom Billing Tutorial book_id : 6495700 Copyright © 2017 by Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC an Ascend Learning Company
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omputer, letting you download textbooks or novels from Web-based publishers. Others include a built-in modem that allows you to c replace the printed book? Why not just buy the book? Does society have a place for the electronic book? Who do you think will use Analysts predict electronic books will revolutionize the publishing industry. An electronic book primarily is a digital storage and display unit. They range in size and weight from a paperback to a two-pound textbook and can hold thousands of pages or the equivalent of ten or more books. You can move forward or backward one page at a time, or use a stylus to write notes in the margin.     What is your opinion of the electronic book? Will it replace the printed book? Why not just buy the book? Does society have a place for the electronic book? Who do you think will use electronic books and how will they use them?
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 Overview of Lecture Not Introduction to Game Theory: Lecture 1, book 1 es Non-cooperative Games: Lecture 1, Chapter 3, book 1  Bayesian Games: Lecture 2, Chapter 4, book 1  Differential Games: Lecture 3, Chapter 5, book 1  Evolutionary Games: Lecture 4, Chapter 6, book 1  Cooperative Games: Lecture 5, Chapter 7, book 1  Auction Theory: Lecture 6, Chapter 8, book 1  Matching Game: Lecture 7, Chapter 2, book 2  Contract Theory, Lecture 8, Chapter 3, book 2  Learning in Game, Lecture 9, Chapter 6, book 2  Stochastic Game, Lecture 10, Chapter 4, book 2  Game with Bounded Rationality, Lecture 11, Chapter 5, book 2  Equilibrium Programming with Equilibrium Constraint, Lecture 12, Chapter 7, book 2  Zero Determinant Strategy, Lecture 13, Chapter 8, book 2  Mean Field Game, Lecture 14, UCLA course  Network Economy, Lecture 15, Dr. Jianwei Huang,  [2]
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1 2 3 --> 5 6 7 8 XML How to Program 10 C How to Program 12 13 14 Java How to Program 15 16 17 C++ How to Program 18 19 20 21 book.xml (1 of 1) 9 11 Outline Perl How to Program 22  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Achievability: Construction  Random codebook with average symbol power M-bit messages 2M W1 0 0 0 W2 0 0 0 ⁞ W2 1 1 1 M n-symbol codewords ··· ··· 0 0 0 1 x11 x12 x13 x21 x22 x23 ··· ··· ··· 1 1 x2M1x2M2x2M3 ··· c(W1) c(W2 ) ⁞ x2 n c(W2 ) x1n x2n M Each symbol M i.i.d.  Codebook revealed to Bob, but not to Willie  Willie knows how codebook is constructed, as well as n and • System obeys Kerckhoffs’s Law: all security is in the key used to construct codebook Department of Computer Science 1313
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• However, the codebook will need to be stored unless a generic codebook is devised which could be used for a particular type of image, in that case we need only store the name of that particular codebook file • In the general case, better results will be obtained with a codebook that is designed for a particular image (c) Scott E Umbaugh, SIUE 2005 140
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03/18/19 18:01 18 Policy Specification 0 2007 0 Level = Unclassified 0 0849350808 0 Level = Confidential 0 0 0 0 Level = Confidential 0 Bhavani Thuraisingham 0 Level = Secret 0 CRC Press 0 Level = Unclassified
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03/18/19 18:01 33 RDF Databases 0 select Book, NumInStock 0 from {Book} book:authoredBy {Author} 0 . book:Stock {NumInStock} 0 Where Author Like “Bhavani*” 0 using namespace 0 book = http://www.example.com/book# 0 The requestor does not have access to the number of book copies in the stock. Therefore, new modified Query: 0 select Book 0 from {Book} book:authoredBy {Author} 0 Where Author Like “Bhavani*” 0 using namespace 0 book = http://www.example.com/book#
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• The ECB then announces a tender procedure • This can be a fixed rate or a variable rate tender – If a fixed rate tender, the interest rate chosen by the Governing Council is fixed at which financial institutions can make bids – These bids are collected by the NCBs and centralized by the ECB – The ECB decides about the total amount to be allotted, and distributes this to the bidding parties pro rata of the size of the bids • ECB now only uses variable rate tenders
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COMPUTING PAGERANK BOOK A People who bought this also bought… BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book B book A book C book C book D BOOK D People who bought this also bought… book C BOOK C People who bought this also bought… book A (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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COMPUTING PAGERANK BOOK A People who bought this also bought… BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book B book A book C book C book D BOOK D People who bought this also bought… book C BOOK C People who bought this also bought… book A (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A BOOK B People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book B book C book A .250 book C .250 book D BOOK D BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .250 .250 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A .250/3 .250/2 People who bought this also bought… book B book C BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book A .250 .250 book C book D .250/3 .250/3 BOOK D .250 .250/2 BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .250 .250 .250 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A .250/3 .250/2 People who bought this also bought… book B book C BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book A .375 .083 book C book D .250/3 .250/3 BOOK D .250 .250/2 BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .083 .250 .458 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A .375/3 .083/2 People who bought this also bought… book B book C BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book A .375 .083 book C book D .375/3 .375/3 BOOK D .458 .083/2 BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .083 .083 .458 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A .375/3 .083/2 People who bought this also bought… book B book C BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book A .500 .125 book C book D .375/3 .375/3 BOOK D .458 .083/2 BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .125 .083 .250 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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PAGERANK BOOK A .400/3 .133/2 People who bought this also bought… book B book C BOOK B People who bought this also bought… book A .400 .133 book C book D .400/3 .400/3 BOOK D .333 .133/2 BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .133 .133 .333 (ignoring damping factor for illustration)
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SIMULATING CHANGES IN PAGERANK BOOK A BOOK B People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book B book C book D book A .400 BOOK D .133 book C BOOK C People who bought this also bought… People who bought this also bought… book C book A .133 Change PR of A PR of C C cuts link to A 0.18 0.50 C links to B 0.38 0.33 C links to D 0.24 0.40 C links to B & D 0.22 0.38 .333
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Electronic Codebook Book (ECB)  message is broken into independent blocks which are encrypted  each block is a value which is substituted, like a codebook, hence name  each block is encoded independently of the other blocks Ci = DESK1(Pi)  uses: secure transmission of single values
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03/18/19 18:01 8 Example 0 The following example illustrates a part of an RDF document describing books: Building_Trustworthy_Semantic_Webs and Managing_and_Mining_Multimedia_Databases. They belong to Class ‘Book’ and have properties: author, publisher, year and ISBN. 0 0 0 0 Bhavani Thuraisingham 0 Auerbach Publications 0 2007
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Problem • Simple example Materials Book A Book B Book C Book D Book E Cost $100 $45 $70 $60 $38 Category Science Art Science Art Social Dept. Computer Science Business Art Budget $550 $880 $660 Preference Book A Book B Book C Book D Book E Computer Science 0.7 0 0.4 0.5 0 Business 0.3 0.7 0.4 0 1 Art 0 0.5 0.6 0.9 0
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Practical Security Issues  Typically symmetric encryption is applied to a unit of data larger than a single 64-bit or 128-bit block  Electronic codebook (ECB) mode is the simplest approach to multiple-block encryption  Each block of plaintext is encrypted using the same key  Cryptanalysts may be able to exploit regularities in the plaintext  Modes of operation  Alternative techniques developed to increase the security of symmetric block encryption for large sequences  Overcomes the weaknesses of ECB
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Practical Security Issues • typically data unit is larger than a single 64-bit or 128-bit block • electronic codebook (ECB) mode – the simplest approach to multiple-block encryption – each block is encrypted using the same key – exploit regularities in the plaintext • modes of operation – alternative techniques to increase the security for large sequences – overcomes the weaknesses of ECB
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