Wait, I don’t get this to myself? • Do a roommate agreement, even if you don’t think you need to! • Talk to your roommate as soon as problems arise, don’t let them build up! • Get help in solving problems if you can’t do it on your own • Communicate! Your roommate(s) can’t read your mind and you can’t read theirs.
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Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
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Not All 20 Point Fonts Are Equal 20  A - Can You Read B - Can You Read C - Can You Read D - Can You Read E - Can You Read F - Can You Read G - Can You Read H - Can You Read I - Can You Read 16  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 14  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 12  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read My Students Tell Me That They Like The Readability Of Ariel Font I never use fonts smaller than 20 point for lecture.
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LIVING ON CAMPUS WITH YOUR AMERICAN ROOMMATE GENERAL TIPS: Talk to your roommate: Don’t be shy! It may seem very awkward at first, but it is important to try and understand each other as much as possible.  Fill out the Roommate Agreement Form early so both of you understand expectations. Visitors:  Let your roommate know when you are ok with visitors and when you are not. Ask them if they have problems with your friends, classmates or significant other visiting at certain times. Having late visitors could be viewed as disrespectful. Keeping the room in order: Set up a cleaning schedule with your roommate(s) and suite mates (if you have them).  This is especially important in regards to bathrooms.  Shared Space: Americans really like their personal space. Talk to your roommate what items and spaces are shared and what is personal. It is very important not to touch someone else’s things unless you know they are ok with it.
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read write architecture behav_detailed of cpu-mem is Microprocessor-Memory Communication signal address: integer; signal data_in, data_out : word; (contd): A more detailed behavioral description signal data_read, data_write, mem_ready: std_logic := `0’; Shantanu Dutt, UIC CPU-Mem begin 6 6’ CMI: process is -- CPU-Memory Interface module data_read variable AR, PC : integer; variable data_reg, instr_reg: word; 3 3’ begin CPU-Mem data_write wait until read = ‘1’ or write = ‘1’; Interface 1 if read = ‘1’ then data_in dr 2 AR := PC; wait for 1 ns; -- 1 ns reg. acc. time 3 2 3’ 3 address <= AR after 2 ns; -- 2 ns prop. delay Memory PC address AR 3 data_read <= `1’ after 2 ns; -- 2ns prop. delay; note simult. w/ addr 4’ 4 4’ wait until mem_ready = ‘1’; 5 +2 data_out 5 instr_reg := data_out; wait for 1 ns; 6 IR <= instr_reg after 1 ns; ir 7’ 7 8 6 data_read <= `0’ after 2 ns; 4’ mem_ready 4 7’ wait until mem_ready = `0’; 8 PC := PC+2; wait for 1 ns; 6 1 DR ARin IR elsif write = ‘1’ then data_reg := DR; AR := ARin; Legend: dr: data_reg wait for 1 ns; -- 1 ns reg acc (both happening in parallel) ir: instr_reg address <= AR after 2 ns; data_in <= data_reg after 2 ns; The red arrows w/ #s show the seq. of operations (or of data_write <= ‘1’ after 2 ns; …………………… end if; corresp. signals). For a # j, j’ end process CMI; denotes the delayed version of CPU the corresp. signal Relate this Memory: process is seq. to the seq. of opers type data_type is array (0 to 63) of word; described in the VHDL code on variable store: data_type; variable temp_reg: word; the left. 2ns reg + 1ns reg (PC) variable addr: integer; RAM access 2ns prop. access delay begin 2ns prop. delay delay delay wait until data_read = `1’ or data_write = `1’; data_read 2ns prop. 3’ if data_read = ‘1’ then – next:1ns reg. & ram access delay for 2ns prop. addr :=address; temp_reg := store(addr/2); wait for 2 ns; read sig. delay mem_ready 4 data_out <= temp_reg after 2 ns; • Multi-process description describing fully responsive handshaking -- RAM r/w time is 1ns; prop. time = 2ns 4 mem_ready <= ‘1’ after 2 ns; between the CPU-Mem interface (CMI) and Memory modules • Most Data/address/control-signal propagation delays and storage 6’ wait until data_read = ‘0’; 7 mem_ready <= ‘0’ after 2 ns; access times are accounted for: delay parameters used: 1-way commun. elsif data_write = ‘1’ then addr := address; store(addr/2) := data_in; wait for 2 ns; ……………… end if; end process Memory; end architecture behav_detailed; time w/ memory = 2 ns, RAM/register r/w time = 1 ns. • Note: A safer form of wait until X = ‘1’ is if X /= ‘1’ then wait until X = ‘1’ when it is not known for sure that X will not be ‘1’ at the point we want to wait for X being ‘1’. Similarly for waiting for X to be ‘0’.
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Example Time Line Read from network Single threaded wait and read compute Compute write and wait wait and read Write to disk … compute write and wait Multi-threaded pipeline wait and read wait and read wait and read wait and read compute compute compute compute write and wait write and wait write and wait CS-502, Cisco 2011 Application Design in a Concurrent World … … write and wait 49
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Execution in Dual-issue Tomasulo Pipeline Iter. Inst. Issue Exe. (begins) 1 LD.D F0,0(R1) 1 2 1 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 1 5 1 S.D 0(R1), F4 2 3 1 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 2 4 1 BNE R1,R2,Loop 3 6 2 LD.D F0,0(R1) 4 7 2 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 4 10 2 S.D 0(R1), F4 5 8 2 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 5 9 2 BNE R1,R2,Loop 6 11 3 LD.D F0,0(R1) 7 12 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 7 15 3 S.D 0(R1), F4 8 13 3 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 8 14 3 BNE R1,R2,Loop 9 16 AM3 LaCASA Mem. Access 3 Write Com. at CDB 4 first issue 8 Wait for LD.D 9 Wait for ADD.D 5 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 8 9 Wait for BNE 13 Wait for LD.D 14 Wait for ADD.D 10 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 13 14 Wait for BNE 18 Wait for LD.D 19 Wait for ADD.D 15 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 103
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What students have said about this approach to reading     “At first when I use to read, reading was hard for me. I don’t mean hard like I couldn’t read, but like I couldn’t understand what the author was putting out. Reading was very difficult because when I’m tested on a question about it, I couldn’t answer. Because I never read and visualized things until now. When I read, I’ll do one sentence at a time and try to summarize it, or sometimes I would picture myself in the description of that sentence. I visualize a lot now. I realize that I am using a method metacognition and since then I’ve been an improved reader whenever I visualize as I read.” –Rashad “I have learned that metacognition is when you think about what you read. Metacognition has changed the things that go on in my head because now I think about what I read more clearly. I predict, picture, question, make connections, identify and problems and check back if I don’t understand something the first time I read it. When I used to read before, I just read to get it over with and be done, but now I really get into books and try to predict and make connections to help me summarize what I read.” –Tiffany “I have learned to slow down, think and understand. Before I was never able to do this because I just wanted to read and just get it over with. In this class I learned something new called ‘metacognition’—a big word with a small meaning—slow down and think.” --Fabian 9 WestEd
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Barriers/Needs To Be Addressed • Need clear job descriptions of program directors/chairs, especially in a post ACT 10 environment • Need to have ample planning and preparedness for the post ACT 10 environment • Need for planning and assessment • Need to improve communication flow throughout the District • Review daycare at regional and metro campuses • Students need help in “navigating” the system – electronically and “faceto-face” • Review bookstore operations districtwide • Need ease in navigating the website • Admin need to come to campuses outside of Truax to meet with students and staff periodically • Need to promote what is available at Madison College • Need to increase communication and input from regional and metro campuses • Refine the registration process • Need to market the campuses • Need to clarify the enrollment process • Need to focus on consistency and clarity • Need to re-establish environment of trust • Need to “reduce” uncertainty • Silos need to be eliminated • Need framework for innovation • Need to “talk to people” about what we have • Need to redesign our thinking processes • Need to create an environment where managers can do their job without fear of losing their job • Reward faculty who make students better • Need greater response time to issues • Need better understanding of who are students are and their needs • Focus on diversity needs to be seen as a direct intent as opposed to lip service • Staff need to be valued and respected for their opinions and thoughts • Need greater outreach efforts • Need to address “bullying” and intimidation • Need to have open and transparent communication • Need to focus on affordability issues to increase access; “Open Door of Opportunity” • College needs to become more culturally relevant – more cultural awareness • Need to address issue aligned with “Best Kept Secret in Town” • Need to reassess our marketing focus to not have marketing drive what we do • Need to determine our campus facilities and operations
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Roommate/Suitemate Pull-In You may wish to pull in a roommate or suitemate of your choice. You don’t have to pick a roommate to choose a bed. Prior to your Room Selection time and during the appropriate roommate matching time during your lottery, you will need to use your Housing Profile to select who you wish to room with and they must also select you.  In other words, if Jane wants to live with Mary, Jane must request Mary AND Mary must request Jane so the word “MATCHES” appears under the roommate request section. Please see the next slide for Roommate Selection instructions.
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More student reflections on Reading Apprenticeship  “It just helps to understand what you’re reading easier. I’ve learned about   how I read which is I visualize a lot more than anything. What I’ve changed in my reading habits is to actually think about what I’m reading and to summarize the paragraphs so I understand better.” –Tasha  “When metacognition was first introduced to me, I really didn’t know what to think about it. I felt a little uncomfortable talking about what I am seeing and thinking about in my mind. Especially with classmates. But it wasn’t that bad. In fact I feel metacognition has helped me with my reading. Before when I read, I would not really visualize much because I felt like I was just trying to get through the reading. But now I find myself taking my time reading, visualizing everything I can.” –Jeremy  “Before learning about metacognition I used to read text and by the next page I would have forgotten what I read. Now I can read something like a whole chapter and remember what I read vividly because of this technique. I think that it enhanced my reading abilities greatly because I put myself in the actual text and imagine myself being there or I will think of how I would react if something ever happened to me like that.” –Kristina 10 WestEd
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Forming Roommate Groups  Select “Room and Roommate Selection” and go to “Roommate/Suitemates”  You will have the option to search for roommates by…  Last Name, First Name, or Email (Simple Roommate Search)  Matching answers to Roommate Match Questionnaire (Advance Roommate Search)  Request your roommate (note: they must confirm your request) ONLY INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR HOUSING APPLICATION FORM AND REGISTERED FOR FALL TERM CLASSES WILL BE PART OF THE SELECTION PROCESS It’s not just a room, it’s a lifestyle
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