Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Subscales of Delaware School Climate Surveys 2013 Student Survey Teacher/Staff Survey Home Survey Part I : School Climate Teacher-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Respect for Diversity Teacher-Student Relations Teacher-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Respect for Diversity Respect for Diversity Clarity of Expectations Clarity of Expectations Clarity of Expectations Fairness of Rules Fairness of Rules Fairness of Rules School Safety School Safety School Safety Student Engagement School-wide Bullying School-wide Student Engagement School-wide Bullying School-wide Teacher-Home Communications Staff Relations Total School Climate Total School Climate Teacher-Home Communications Total School Climate Parent Satisfaction
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Subscales of Delaware School Climate Surveys 2013 Teacher/Staff Student Survey Home Survey Survey Part I : School Climate Teacher-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Respect for Diversity Teacher-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Respect for Diversity Teacher-Student Relations Student-Student Relations Respect for Diversity Clarity of Expectations Clarity of Expectations Clarity of Expectations Fairness of Rules Fairness of Rules Fairness of Rules School Safety School Safety School Safety Student Engagement School-wide Bullying School-wide Student Engagement School-wide Bullying School-wide Teacher-Home Communications Staff Relations Total School Climate Total School Climate Teacher-Home Communications Total School Climate Parent Satisfaction
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Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Enter result Passed 6 Failed 4 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 (1 = = = = = = = = = = pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 = = = = = = = = = = fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Enter result (1 Passed 9 Failed 1 Raise tuition = = = = = = = = = = pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, pass, 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 = = = = = = = = = = fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): fail): 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 Outline fig02_11.cpp output (1 of 1)  2003 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved. 37
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VI. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Final Student Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y Cooperating Teacher STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR The cooperating teacher should complete this evaluation and ALL COPIES RETURNE D to the DIRECTOR OF FIELD EXPE RIENCES by Monday of the last week of the student teaching experience. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and pedagogy of the content area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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Conversion of Flow Diagrams to Case Bases T1 FAIL PASS T2 T3 FAIL FAIL PASS PASS D1 T4 T4 D2 PASS T5 T6 PASS D4 FAIL D7 FAIL PASS D3 D6 FAIL T1 PASS PASS FAIL FAIL FAIL FAIL FAIL T2 PASS FAIL ? ? ? ? ? T3 ? ? FAIL PASS PASS PASS PASS T4 ? ? ? PASS PASS PASS FAIL T5 ? ? ? PASS PASS FAIL ? T6 ? ? ? PASS FAIL ? ? Diagnosis D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D5 Trace each path of TFD to create one entry in CB (ordering of tests lost) © 1998 HRL Laboratories, LLC. All Rights Reserved 15
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Concerns About ALN Learning  Concerns About the Explosion of ALN in Education  Concerns About Residency Living & Learning on Campus  Concerns About Impersonality and Becoming Irrevocably Orwellian  Concerns About Making ALN Learning Too Easy  Concerns About Making ALN Learning Too Hard  Concerns About Corporate Influences on Traditional Missions  Concerns About Library Services  Concerns About Academic Standards and Student Ethics  Concerns About Messaging Overload  Concerns About Faculty Efficiency and Burnout  Concerns About Misleading and Fraudulent Web Sites  Concerns About CyberPsychology  Concerns About Computer Services and Network Reliability  Concerns About Faculty Resistance to Change  Concerns About Effectiveness of Learning Technologies in Large Classes 1-58
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