Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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Epidermis anatomy—more details Hair and nails—modified structures of epidermis • Nails – Scale-like epidermal structure – Cells bind together and have “hard” keratin – Grows out from root of nail • Hair – Each shaft has three layers of keratinzed cells filled with “hard” keratin – Flat, ribbon-like shaft produces kinky hair; oval shaft makes wavy hair; round shaft makes coarse hair – Hair color due to amount of melanins of different colors made my melanocytes at base of hair follicle; red hair also has iron-containing pigment; gray/white hair due to decreased melanin production – Hair follicle • • • • • Fold of epidermal surface into dermis Hair grows from here Has nerve plexus to give touch/tickle sensation Connective tissue sheath derived from dermis Hair length due to relationship between active and inactive phases of follicle (e.g., eyebrow follicles active only three to four months; head follicles can be continuosly active for years) Frolich, Human Anatomy, Skin
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ASCII Confirmation Program #3 ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII Characters & Strings Lesson 1 CS1313 Fall 2016 Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _ 16
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ASCII Confirmation Program #4 ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code # 96 # 97 # 98 # 99 #100 #101 #102 #103 #104 #105 #106 #107 #108 #109 #110 #111 is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: ‘ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII ASCII Characters & Strings Lesson 1 CS1313 Fall 2016 Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code Code #112 #113 #114 #115 #116 #117 #118 #119 #120 #121 #122 #123 #124 #125 #126 is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: is: p q r s t u v w x y z { | } ~ 17
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Field Information Provided to Students Dress Code         Review dress policy with agency; comply with dress code at all times No piercings except for earrings No visible tattoos at any time No cleavage visible at any time; blouses and shirts are to be tucked in at all times unless specifically designed to be worn outside No tank tops or camis No exposure of mid-section of body No jeans or shorts unless there is a designated dress down day or dress code for specific event No casual shoes (flip flops, etc.); shoes are never to be August 2015 - 16 University of Central Florida - Office of Field Education 42
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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High Need Academic Competence • • • • • • • Personal Competence • • • • • • • GPA is a 2.0 or below; Maybe on probation and at risk of being suspended or dismissed Does not complete courses successfully; receives D, INC, F grades, or withdraws from most or all courses Struggles greatly with academic challenges; cannot cope with challenges; gives up easily Does not have acquisition of time management skills; does not prioritize Chronic absences from or lateness to class and often takes extended breaks during class Work is of poor quality; unrealistic expectations of professors role; no accountability May have some knowledge of college and program resources, but does not utilize No interest in co-curricular activities and places no value to the importance of participation Cannot balance personal and academic life; focuses on personal life stressors and is easily distracted Does not participate in program and college activities Reflection on parental, familial and affective relationships, and feels powerless or has an unwillingness to make adjustments Is not aware of procrastination or refuses to address procrastination Chronic excuse making, blaming others; does not take responsibility; unrealistic Non-committal Mid Need Low Need • GPA is below 2.5; at risk of falling into probation Completes courses with inconsistent grades; may withdraw from a course Shows awareness of academic challenges; struggles to meet challenges successfully Shows awareness of time management issues, but struggles with prioritizing Attends class to meet minimum requirements and may have minor punctuality issues Work is of average to poor quality Shows awareness of college and program resources, but underutilized • • Is aware of co-curricular activities and shows some interest in participating Desires to be organized, but has difficulty balancing personal and academic life Inconsistent in participating in program and college activities Reflection on parental, familial and affective relationships, but has difficulty making adjustments Hesitant of collaborating with other students in program activities or group work Is aware of procrastinating but struggles with completing tasks and follow through Shows signs of anxiety when under stress • Is aware of importance of career exploration, and moderately confident in their choice of major Is aware of importance of professionalism Inconsistent with setting clear vocational plans and aspirations; difficulty identifying personal interests; some interest in educational and vocational exploration Is aware of study abroad opportunities, and considers it as an option Is aware of scholarship opportunities, and considers it as an option • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Career Planning Competence • • • • • Has not explored career paths, and indecisive as to what major to choose Conducts themselves unprofessionally Inability to identify clear vocational plans and aspirations; unaware of personal interests; distracted from pursuing educational and vocational exploration Views study abroad opportunities as far reaching and unrealistic options Views scholarship opportunities as far reaching and unrealistic options; unwilling to follow through with application process • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Maintain GPA of at least 3.0 Successfully complete all courses; rarely withdraws and only as a last resource Shows awareness of academic challenges; copes successfully with challenges Manages time efficiently, prioritizes Attends class regularly and is on time Work meets high quality standards Makes use of college and program resources Is aware of importance of participation in co-curricular activities Is organized/balances personal and academic life Actively participates in program and college activities Reflection on and readjustment of parental, familial and affective relationships Collaborates with other students in program activities Does not procrastinate Keeps stress levels under control Is aware of importance of active involvement in career exploration Is aware of importance of conducting oneself professionally Setting vocational plans & aspirations; identifying personal interests; educational and vocational exploration) Attended a study abroad workshop Attended a scholarship presentation Researched scholarship opportunities
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Related Work (2) • Parking space assignment algorithms based on differential pricing – D. Mackowski et al. developed a demand-based real-time pricing model to allocate parking spaces in urban centers • FPS works with free spaces and does not require any pricing data – D. Ayala et al. developed an offline pricing model for curbside parking • FPS handles a dynamic parking space assignment – Y.Geng et al. developed a real-time pricing model to for parking garages and does not consider the cost of total travel time • FPS works on free curbside parking and uses both walking and driving time as primary factors in its parking assignment algorithm • Parkarr: crowd-sourced parking application – Cannot address the problem of high parking space contention – FPS is capable to reduce parking space contention 26
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Additional Questions & Answers Access, ID Card, Feedback 1 How do I gain computer access? HR will add you to the College’s system (Colleague) today after orientation. Your username and Employee ID are automatically generated. HR will send your ID to your supervisor. IT Services holds specialized network training. Contact Linda Boney at x7481 or [email protected] to schedule an appointment. 2 When and where will I get my employee ID card? You may obtain your ID card beginning tomorrow at 9:00 AM in the Union Station Lobby or in the library on the North Campus. You will need this ID card to park in any parking deck, employee discounts around town, or to gain access to CFCC sporting events. 3 Where will I park? You have a few options for parking. You will obtain a parking decal or hang tag at the Union Station Lobby. Parking options for the downtown campus: Nutt Street Employee parking deck or part-time/student parking deck and designated lots. North Campus parking spots are designated as Faculty/Staff parking throughout the campus.
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Additional Questions & Answers Access, ID Card, Feedback 1 How do I gain computer access? HR will add you to the College’s system (Colleague) today after orientation. Your username and Employee ID are automatically generated. HR will send your ID to your supervisor. IT Services holds specialized network training. Contact Robert Carter at x7195 or [email protected] to schedule an appointment. 2 When and where will I get my employee ID card? You may obtain your ID card in the Union Station Lobby or in the library on the North Campus. You will need this ID card to park in any parking deck, employee discounts around town, or to gain access to CFCC sporting events. 3 Where will I park? You have a few options for parking. You will obtain a parking decal or hang tag at the Union Station Lobby. Parking options for the downtown campus: Nutt Street Employee parking deck or part-time/student parking deck and designated lots. North Campus parking spots are designated as Faculty/Staff parking throughout the campus.
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