24 Functions are not Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods F are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions
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Questioning Resrouces Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Barnes, C.P. (1983). Questioning in college classrooms. In Ellner, C.L. & Barnes, C.P., Studies in college teaching: Experimental results, theoretical interpretations, and new perspectives. Macmillan Publishing Company Bloom, B.S. (Ed.). (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. New York: Longman. Braxton, J.M. (1993). Selectivity and rigor in research universities. The Journal of Higher Education 64: 657-675. Brookfield, S. & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms (second edition). San Francisco,CA: Jossey-Bass Davis, B.G. (2001). Tools for teaching. San Francisco,CA: Jossey-Bass Justice, C. et. al. (2007). Inquiry in higher education: Reflections and directions on course design and teaching methods. Innovative Higher Education 31: 201-214. Mayer, R.E. et. al. (2009). Clickers in college classrooms: Fostering learning with questioning methods in large lecture classes. Contemporary Educational Psychology 24: 51-57. McKeachie, W.J. & Svinicki, M. (2006). McKeachie’s Teaching Tips. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Middlecamp, C.H. & Nickel, A. (2005). Doing science and asking questions II: An exercise that generates questions. Journal of Chemical Education 82: 1181-1186 Nilson, L.B. (2003). Teaching at its best (second edition). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing. Nygren, K. (2007). Elevating knowledge from level 1 to level 3. In Beyerlein, S.W., Holmes, C., & Apple, D.K. Faculty Guidebook. Pacific Crest. Renaud, R.D. & Murray, H.G. (2007). The validity of higher-order questions as a process indicator of educational quality. Research in Higher Education 48: 319-351. Wood, E. (2010). It is yours for the asking: Using questioning to promote discussion in the classroom. In Black, C. The Dynamic classroom: Engaging students in higher education. Madison, WI: Atwood Publishing.
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VI. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Final Student Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y Cooperating Teacher STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR The cooperating teacher should complete this evaluation and ALL COPIES RETURNE D to the DIRECTOR OF FIELD EXPE RIENCES by Monday of the last week of the student teaching experience. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and pedagogy of the content area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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read write architecture behav_detailed of cpu-mem is Microprocessor-Memory Communication signal address: integer; signal data_in, data_out : word; (contd): A more detailed behavioral description signal data_read, data_write, mem_ready: std_logic := `0’; Shantanu Dutt, UIC CPU-Mem begin 6 6’ CMI: process is -- CPU-Memory Interface module data_read variable AR, PC : integer; variable data_reg, instr_reg: word; 3 3’ begin CPU-Mem data_write wait until read = ‘1’ or write = ‘1’; Interface 1 if read = ‘1’ then data_in dr 2 AR := PC; wait for 1 ns; -- 1 ns reg. acc. time 3 2 3’ 3 address <= AR after 2 ns; -- 2 ns prop. delay Memory PC address AR 3 data_read <= `1’ after 2 ns; -- 2ns prop. delay; note simult. w/ addr 4’ 4 4’ wait until mem_ready = ‘1’; 5 +2 data_out 5 instr_reg := data_out; wait for 1 ns; 6 IR <= instr_reg after 1 ns; ir 7’ 7 8 6 data_read <= `0’ after 2 ns; 4’ mem_ready 4 7’ wait until mem_ready = `0’; 8 PC := PC+2; wait for 1 ns; 6 1 DR ARin IR elsif write = ‘1’ then data_reg := DR; AR := ARin; Legend: dr: data_reg wait for 1 ns; -- 1 ns reg acc (both happening in parallel) ir: instr_reg address <= AR after 2 ns; data_in <= data_reg after 2 ns; The red arrows w/ #s show the seq. of operations (or of data_write <= ‘1’ after 2 ns; …………………… end if; corresp. signals). For a # j, j’ end process CMI; denotes the delayed version of CPU the corresp. signal Relate this Memory: process is seq. to the seq. of opers type data_type is array (0 to 63) of word; described in the VHDL code on variable store: data_type; variable temp_reg: word; the left. 2ns reg + 1ns reg (PC) variable addr: integer; RAM access 2ns prop. access delay begin 2ns prop. delay delay delay wait until data_read = `1’ or data_write = `1’; data_read 2ns prop. 3’ if data_read = ‘1’ then – next:1ns reg. & ram access delay for 2ns prop. addr :=address; temp_reg := store(addr/2); wait for 2 ns; read sig. delay mem_ready 4 data_out <= temp_reg after 2 ns; • Multi-process description describing fully responsive handshaking -- RAM r/w time is 1ns; prop. time = 2ns 4 mem_ready <= ‘1’ after 2 ns; between the CPU-Mem interface (CMI) and Memory modules • Most Data/address/control-signal propagation delays and storage 6’ wait until data_read = ‘0’; 7 mem_ready <= ‘0’ after 2 ns; access times are accounted for: delay parameters used: 1-way commun. elsif data_write = ‘1’ then addr := address; store(addr/2) := data_in; wait for 2 ns; ……………… end if; end process Memory; end architecture behav_detailed; time w/ memory = 2 ns, RAM/register r/w time = 1 ns. • Note: A safer form of wait until X = ‘1’ is if X /= ‘1’ then wait until X = ‘1’ when it is not known for sure that X will not be ‘1’ at the point we want to wait for X being ‘1’. Similarly for waiting for X to be ‘0’.
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III. US Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Stude nt Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y University Supervisor STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED Candidate Evaluation Observation Report # (Circle) HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR 1 Copies: WHITE - University Supervisor YELLOW - Cooperating Teacher B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and p edagogy of thecontent area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. 5 6 PINK – Student Teacher Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments 4 Unsatisfactory DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. 3 Performance Level A Developing DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners 2 A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Execution in Dual-issue Tomasulo Pipeline Iter. Inst. Issue Exe. (begins) 1 LD.D F0,0(R1) 1 2 1 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 1 5 1 S.D 0(R1), F4 2 3 1 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 2 4 1 BNE R1,R2,Loop 3 6 2 LD.D F0,0(R1) 4 7 2 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 4 10 2 S.D 0(R1), F4 5 8 2 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 5 9 2 BNE R1,R2,Loop 6 11 3 LD.D F0,0(R1) 7 12 ADD.D F4,F0,F2 7 15 3 S.D 0(R1), F4 8 13 3 DADDIU R1,R1,-#8 8 14 3 BNE R1,R2,Loop 9 16 AM3 LaCASA Mem. Access 3 Write Com. at CDB 4 first issue 8 Wait for LD.D 9 Wait for ADD.D 5 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 8 9 Wait for BNE 13 Wait for LD.D 14 Wait for ADD.D 10 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 13 14 Wait for BNE 18 Wait for LD.D 19 Wait for ADD.D 15 Wait for ALU Wait for DAIDU 103
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