Bed Restriction 1. Keep a sleep diary throughout the treatment period. 2. First work on keeping the same lights out & lights on schedule. Keep the same bedtimes and out-of-bed times on weekends and weekdays. Get help from family or friends in getting out of bed at the same time each day. 3. If you start with 6 hours of bed restriction, determine your starting “lights out” time by subtracting 6 hours from your chosen wake time. 4. If you are able to obtain good sleep (that is, about 90% of the time you are in bed is sleep) for three days, add on 15 minutes of time in bed. Add on the additional time in bed at the beginning of the night, keeping your wake time the same. 5. Every three days reevaluate: if you are obtaining good sleep add on another 15 minutes of time in bed. If insomnia returns, subtract 15 minutes of time in bed. 6. Make sure you get as much rest as you need during your wake/lights on time. Starting Lights out/In Bed: __________________________ Lights On/Out of Bed: __________________________ Stimulus Control 1. The goal of stimulus control is to have your brain think the bed is a place to sleep instead of a place to be awake. 2. The bed is for sleep and sleep is for the bed. Go to bed only when you are sleepy. 3. If you don’t fall asleep in 15 to 20 minutes, get up, go into another room (if possible), and lay quietly in darkness until sleepy. This other place is your “insomnia bed.” Try listening to music, a book on tape, or the radio. 4. Don’t watch the clock. Just guess when 15-20 minutes have passed. Plan ahead of time what you are going to do during the time you are out of bed.
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Replay    QoE measurement  Old way: QoE = Server + Network  Modern way: QoE = Servers + Network + Browser Browsers are smart  Parallelism on multiple connections  JavaScript execution can trigger additional queries  Rendering introduces delays in resource access  Caching and pre-fetching HTTP replay cannot approximate real Web browser access to resources 0.25s 0.25s 0.06s 1.02s 0.67s 0.90s 1.19s 0.14s 0.97s 1.13s 0.70s 0.28s 0.27s 0.12s 3.86s 1.88s Total network time GET /wiki/page 1 Analyze page GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET combined.min.css jquery-ui.css main-ltr.css commonPrint.css shared.css flaggedrevs.css Common.css wikibits.js jquery.min.js ajax.js mwsuggest.js plugins...js Print.css Vector.css raw&gen=css ClickTracking.js Vector...js js&useskin WikiTable.css CommonsTicker.css flaggedrevs.js Infobox.css Messagebox.css Hoverbox.css Autocount.css toc.css Multilingual.css mediawiki_88x31.png 2 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET ExtraTools.js Navigation.js NavigationTabs.js Displaytitle.js RandomBook.js Edittools.js EditToolbar.js BookSearch.js MediaWikiCommon.css 3 Rendering + JavaScript GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET GET 4 GET GET GET GET GET GET page-base.png page-fade.png border.png 1.png external-link.png bullet-icon.png user-icon.png tab-break.png tab-current.png tab-normal-fade.png search-fade.png Rendering search-ltr.png arrow-down.png wiki.png portal-break.png portal-break.png arrow-right.png generate page send files send files mBenchLab – [email protected] BROWSERS MATTER FOR QOE? send files send files + 2.21s total rendering time 6
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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UMMSM CURRICULUM (MD) (5 weeks) P B L Epi 2 Fdn Onc Nov/Dec Renal System (5 weeks) Doctoring GI & Nutritio n Sept/Oct P B L (5 weeks) Patient Safety Transitio n to Wards Core Clerkships (8, 6 or 4 weeks)  Feb Mar Apr P B L Endocri ne & Repro System Hem e -Onc (4 Weeks) (5 weeks) Doctoring IV  Core Clerkships (8, 6 or 4 weeks) OSCEs Required Clerkship/Electives Required Clerkship/Electives Graduation May Winter Break June Year 4 an ( 8 weeks) June Winter Break Year 3 Orientation June J Respiratory System Doctoring III  Orientation Year 2 (2 weeks) Aug Doctoring II Neuroscie nce & Behavior al Science May P B L  Competency Assessment Week USMLE Preparation Doctoring I  B L Spring Break (8 weeks) June P PB L Vacation (4 weeks) B L Apr/May Cellul Cardioar vascular System Functi (8 weeks) on & Epidemiolog Reguy lation (concurrent (4 CVS) weeks) w/ Competency Assessment Week (8 weeks) P PB L Spring Break Molecu lar Basis of Life Human Struct ure Host Defens es Pathog en & Patholo gy Feb/Mar (4 weeks) Jan CBL Inflam/DI Nov Competenc y Oct Winter Break Orientation Year 1 Orientation DermOphtho Doctoring Courses • Clinical Skills • Communication Skills • Health Informatics & Info • Ethics/ Professionalism • Geriatrics/Pallia tive/ Pain • Population Health Problem • Special Based Learning Populations • Patient & Infection Safety/QI Inflammation • Rheumatology Systems Based • Infectious Care Diseases Organ System Modules  Core Modules  Aug Winter Break • Embryology • Histology • Gross Anatomy • Medical Genetics • Biochemistry • Cell Biology • Cellular Biophysics • Intro to Pharmacology • Immunology • Microbiology • Intro to Pathology Core Clerkships IM 8 weeks Surgery 8 weeks OB/GYN 6 weeks Psychiatry 6 weeks Pediatrics 6 Required weeks clerkship/Electives ElectivesA 6 4 Subinternship weeksweeks GPC Subinternship B 4 4 weeks weeks Family Med 4 Geriatrics 4 weeks weeks EMed 4 weeks Radiology 4 weeks Neurology 4 weeks Anesthesia 2
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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 I am forwarding my marriage certificate and three children, one of which is a mistake as you can see.  I want my money as quick as I can get it. I’ve been in bed with the doctor for two weeks and he doesn’t do any good. If things don’t improve, I will have to send for another doctor.
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 I am forwarding my marriage certificate and three children, one of which is a mistake as you can see.  I want my money as quick as I can get it. I’ve been in bed with the doctor for two weeks and he doesn’t do any good. If things don’t improve, I will have to send for another doctor.
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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C1 01TBM Three blind mice 3 SO1 35SSS Sing a song of sixpence .18 .14 02TLP This little pig went to market DO1 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 07OMH Old Mother Hubbard 04LMM Little Miss Muffet 30HDD Hey diddle diddle 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 08JSC Jack Sprat could eat no fat C2 ffa=39LCS 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 05HDS Humpty Dumpty C11 12OWF There came an old woman from France 11OMM One misty moisty morning 01TBM Three blind mice 13RRS A robin and a robins son 15PCD Great A. little a 02TLP This little pig went to market 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 16PPG Flour of England 22HLH I had a little husband 04LMM Little Miss Muffet 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor 28BBB Baa baa black sheep 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon 37MBB Here we go round mulberry bush 13RRS A robin and a robins son 25WOW There was an old woman 38YLS If I had as much money as I could tell 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 26SBS Sleep baby sleep 39LCS A little cock sparrow 16PPG Flour of England 27CBC Cry baby cry 41OKC Old King Cole 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor C21 ffa=21LAU 29LFW When little Fred went to bed 42BBC Bat bat, come under my hat 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe 05HDS Humpty Dumpty 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 50LJH Little Jack Horner 11OMM One misty moisty morning 25WOW There was an old woman 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark .26 15PCD Great A. little a 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood DO4 .46 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 45BBB Bye baby bunting .19 22HLH I had a little husband 28BBB Baa baa black sheep 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 46TTP Tom Tom the pipers son 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn SO8 41OKC Old King Cole 37MBB Here we go round mulberry 46TTP Tom Tom the pipers son 49WLG There was a little girl 50LJH Little Jack Horner 38YLS If I had as much money SO9 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn .28 2.2 SO2 08JSC Jack Sprat 42BBC Bat bat, come under my hat 49WLG There was a little girl 39LCS A little cock sparrow C12 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe .42 C111 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near C211 ffa=37 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John .41 12OWF There came old woman France 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 26SBS Sleep baby sleep 05HDS Humpty Dumpty 2 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 27CBC Cry baby cry 11OMM One misty moisty morning 13RRS A robin and a robins son .31 1.3 29LFW When little Fred went to bed 15PCD Great A. little a 14ASO If all the seas were one sea 45BBB Bye baby bunting 22HLH I had a little husband 16PPG Flour of England SO15 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse 1.53 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 37MBB Here we go round mulberry .42 29LFW When little Fred went bed 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon SO3 38YLS If I had as much money 25WOW There was an old woman 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe C121 ffa=29 46TTP Tom Tom pipers DO3 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle SO10 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 09HBD Hush baby. Daddy is near 01TBM Three blind mice SO11 42BBC Bat bat, come undert 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 26SBS Sleep baby sleep DO2 17FEC Here sits the Lord Mayor 21LAU The Lion and the Unicorn 44HLH The hart he loves the high wood 27CBC Cry baby cry .38 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 45BBB Bye baby bunting 02TLP This little pig C2111 ffa=15 SO14 49WLG There was a little girl .1.6 04LMM Little Miss Muffet .36 05HDS Humpty Dumpty C1111 12OWF The came ol woman France 15PCD Great A. little a 1.8 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 22HLH I had a little husband 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 36LTT Little Tommy Tittlemouse SO4 13RRS A robin and a robins son 38YLS If I had as much money 16PPG Flour of England 10JAJ Jack and Jill went up the hill 48OTB One two, buckle my shoe 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay TO1 23MTB How many miles is it to Babylon SO12 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 14ASO If all the seas 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair 11OMM One misty moisty SO13 25WOW There was an old woman 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 44HLH The hart he loves 37MBB Here we go rnd mulberry 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 49WLG There was a little girl C2111 seems to be lullabys? no gaps C2111 seems to focus on .3 1.3 SO5 C11111 extremes? (big and small) 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling my son John 13RRS A robin and TO2 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 16PPG Flour of England 23MTB How many miles to Babylon 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 33BFP Buttons, a farthing a pair Notes: 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle 43HHD Hark hark, the dogs do bark 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn In text mining, just about any document is eventually going to be an 49WLG There was a little girl C111111 SO6 outlier due to the fact that we are projecting high dimension (44 here) onto 06SPP See a pin and pick it up 16PPG Flour of England SO7 03DDD Diddle diddle dumpling dimension=1. Thus the ffa will almost always be an outlier in LAvgffa. 18HTP I had two pigeons bright and gay 47CCM Cocks crow in the morn 32JGF Jack, come give me your fiddle MG44d60w A-FFA dendogram
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Timeline Timeline from July 18, 2004 (proposal due date).  Identify Objectives – August 1 (2 weeks)  Outline Content  General outline – August 8 (3 weeks)  Content written – August 22 (5 weeks)  Content revised and final – September 5 (7 weeks)  Outline Navigation  General outline – August 22 (5 weeks)  Navigation mapped – August 29 (6 weeks)  Navigation revised and final – September 8 (7 ½ weeks)  Storyboard Site  First storyboard session – September 6 (7 weeks+)  Rough storyboards due – September 12 (8 weeks)  Storyboard revision session – September 13 (8 weeks+)  Final storyboards due – September 19 (9 weeks)     Develop Site  First development session – September 20 (9 weeks+)  Last development session – October 10 (12 weeks) Test Site  Internal tests performed – October 11 (12 weeks+)  External tests performed – October 19 (13 weeks+) Modify Site (if needed)  Ongoing modifications as tests indicate.  Final modifications done – October 31 (15 weeks) Publish Site – November 1 (15 weeks) Total time from proposal due date to site publication: 15 weeks
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