Worth trying harder?  I am forwarding my marriage certificate and six children. I had seven, but one died, which was baptized on a half sheet of paper.  Mrs. Jones has not had any clothes for a year and has been visited regularly by the clergy.
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 I am forwarding my marriage certificate and six children. I had seven, but one died, which was baptized on a half sheet of paper.  Mrs. Jones has not had any clothes for a year and has been visited regularly by the clergy.
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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The LRC visits & number of hours visited are up versus year ago. SJC…number of visits increased by 31% and number of hours visited increased by 89% (3) ….had over 1,400 visits per week(3) (2) the LRC … over a 1/3 (36%) of all students visited(2) MVC…number of visits increased by 2% and number of hours visited increased by 6% (3) … had over 1,900 visits per week(3) (2) the LRC … over 4 out of 10 students visited(2) SJC LRC # Visits FA06 SP07 FA07 SP08 FA08 FA06 SP07 FA07 SP08 FA08 16,98 7 14,83 3 18,46 9 18,016 24,121 29,349 31,281 32,530 35,214 33,143 9% 21% 31% 11% 13% 2% 20,97 9 27,515 39,633 46,817 51,660 49,855 22% 47% 89% -11% - 8% 6% Chg. vs. Yr. ago # Hours visited 17,20 2 18,77 4 Chg. vs. Yr. ago Avg. length of visit MVC 52,419 56,104 1hr 1m 1h 16m 1h 8m 1h 32m 1h 39m 1h 47m 1h 48m 1h 26m 1h 28m 1hr 30m # Students that visited(1) 1,933 1,859 2,171 2,099 2,562 3,354 3,625 3,946 4,269 4,299 % Student that visited 37% 32% 31% 33% 36% 41% 41% 43% 43% 40% 8.5 8.0 8.5 8.6 9.4 8.7 8.6 8.2 8.2 7.7 8.6 10.1 9.7 13.1 15.5 15.6 15.5 11.9 12.1 11.6 194 258 379 354 1,065 1,419 2,105 1,950 (2) # Visits / student (1) # Hrs. visited / student (1) # Visits / day(3) # Visits / wk(3) (1)#Unduplicated, on 1 Student (2) onBased Census st (1) Census, (3)Calculation based on 17.5 wk semester, 92 total days7,126 opened, Saturday was counted as ½ day, 9,259 16.7 total 5.5 9,818 day wks. 5,439 5,861 7,087 6,345 8,132 8,841 10,707 Source: MSJCD MIS DataTel XKN, R&P Dept. XCJH.3.3.9
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LETTER OF INTENT The effect of high intensity interval training versus moderate intensity training on anthropometric and cardiovascular health in children who are overweight or obese: A pilot study. PI Name: Ashwin Agrawal, DO, MA Stony Brook Children’s Hospital HSC T-11, Room 040 Stony Brook, NY 11794-8111 631-358-6106 [email protected] Funding Path Academic Pediatric Association Resident Investigator (RIA) Primary Mentor Name Peter Morelli, MD, FACC [email protected] Residency Program Director Name Robyn Blair, MD [email protected] Department Chair Name Margaret McGovern, MD [email protected] Participation Statement If funded, I agree to participate in any conference calls and/or in-person grantee meetings WORK IN PROGRESS…. PROBLEM, BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Approximately 30% of children in the United States are overweight/obese leading to a public health epidemic.[1] Pediatric obesity is linked to numerous acute and chronic health conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, hypertension, and significant increase in all-cause mortality.[2, 3] Diet and exercise decrease the risk of obesity.[4] However, only 27% of children perform the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise. [5] The American Academy of Pediatrics endorses that pediatricians assist children and their families with lifestyle modification such as diet and exercise to improve the physical, cognitive and mental state of children.[4] Fit Kids for Life (FKFL) is a 10 week lifestyle modification program developed and offered by Stony Brook Children’s since 1998 which incorporates nutritional guidance, wellness and a supervised exercise regimen for obese children in our community. Efficacy of pediatric obesity interventions is equivocal with many studies noting high attrition rates and poor long term adherence.[6-8] Factors that contribute to high attrition include: difficulty of exercise, repetitiveness/boredom from exercise routine or that weight loss was not visible. [6] Therefore, it is important to develop a novel, time efficient modality that will motivate, captivate and promote exercise and healthy nutrition for children to help reduce rates of pediatric obesity. Ideal intensity and duration of exercise programs for effective weight loss and improved health in pediatric populations is unclear.[6] Most pediatric obesity programs, including FKFL, have utilized moderate intensity training (MIT) which consists of exercise in 60 minute circuits.[6, 7] High intensity interval training programs (HIIT) have emerged and are effective at reducing weight and cardiovascular risk markers in adults.[9] Less is known abou the role of HIIT in the overweight/obese pediatric population. Early studies suggest that HIIT may have improved health benefits for children and adolescents. [10] Compared to MIT, HIIT programs employ short bursts of near maxim exercise intensity (HR ≥75% HR max) followed by brief rest periods and have a shorter duration (generally 30minutes). [10] HIIT programs have been found to be attractive to children and adolescents for several reasons including: 1) HIIT more closely mimics typical movements of children - short bouts (< 15 seconds) and high intensity, 2) HIIT can be delivered in a shorter timeframe, and 3) HIIT paradigms are more like playing a game which may decrease boredom, increase enjoyment and promote higher adherence.[11-13] Currently used outcome measures in pediatric obesity studies (such as height, weight, waist to hip ratio, Body mass Index [BMI], heart rate [HR] and blood pressure [BP]) may not be ideal. For example, BMI is influenced by linear growth and ineffective at quantifying body composition; waist circumference, while promoted by the WHO as a valid predictor of cardiovascular disease, is fraught with measurement reliability issues; and vascular health may not be reflected by BP and HR changes alone. Three dimensional (3D) body imaging is a new technique which may offer greater reliability in measuring body circumferences and inferring body composition. In addition, bio-electrical impedance has shown to evaluate fat content and muscle mass fairly accurately. In terms of cardiovascular health, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) is a safe, non-invasive technique which correlates strongly with coronary endothelial function and predicts cardiovascular disease.[14, 15] In the adult literature, FMD has revealed improved vascular health following exercise and diet, even in the absence of weight loss. Therefore, FMD may be a strong indicator of cardiovascular improvement following the FKFL program, and this outcome may reflect program success despite lack of change in anthropometric measures. Studies show improved vascular health (FMD) in adults even when body composition and weight have not changed, thus FMD may potentially be a more sensitive measure of exercise (and overall program) effect.[15] SPECIFIC AIMS: Specific Aim 1: To determine if high intensity interval training (HIIT) is a better alternative to moderate intensity training (MIT) for improvements in a) BMI and weight loss, b) body composition by a novel 3D body scanning method and bioelectric impedance and and, c) cardiovascular health measured by FMD and heart rate variability in children and adolescents who are overweight and obese. Specific Aim 2a: To determine if children/adolescents who complete HIIT program have better attendance and long term adherence to lifestyle changes compared to the MIT group. Specific Aim 2b: To determine if children in the HIIT program report higher enjoyment and satisfaction compared to the MIT group. HYPOTHESES: Hypothesis 1: Children who complete the FKFL HIIT protocol will have greater improvements in CV health (as measured by BMI, body composition, vital signs, and FMD) as compared Commented [1]: I would remove this line. BIA is not
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