So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Pronouns and antecedents should “agree” in case, number, person, and gender. Personal pronouns, nominative case Possessive pronouns Person/num ber Singular Plural Person/num ber Singular Plural 1st person I we 1st person my, mine our, ours 2nd person you you 2nd person your, yours your, yours 3rd person his, her, hers, its their, theirs 3rd person he, she, they Subject: I think, you did, it we write, they are Personal pronouns, objective case Reflexive/Intensive pronouns Person/num ber Singular Plural Person/num ber Singula r Plural 1st person me us 1st person myself ourselves 2nd person you you 2nd person yourself yourselves 3rd person himself, herself, itself themselve s 3rd person him, her, them Object: You told me. I gave it you the answer. The book belongs to her. I can’t hear you.
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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PRONOUNS ARE GOOD TO KNOW IN OTHER SITUATIONS, TOO. Possessive Pronouns (DO NOT NEED AN APOSTROPHE) Reflexive/ Intensive Pronouns I he her him it she they them us we hers his its my mine our ours their theirs your herself himself itself myself ourselves themselves yourself you yours Personal Pronouns George hurt himself. George himself was not hurt. Relative Pronouns (used to introduce a modifier) Interrogative Pronouns (used in questions) Demonstrative Indefinite Pronouns (used Pronouns to point out people or things) “that person” Indefinite Pronouns (cont.) that what which who whom whose what which who whom whose that this these those all another any anybody anyone both each either everybody everyone many most neither nobody none no one one other several some(body) (one) few such “Who goes there?”
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24 Functions are not Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods F are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions
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Pronoun - Used in place of one or more nouns Antecedent - word to which pronoun refers Personal pronouns, nominative case Possessive pronouns Person/num ber Singular Plural Person/num ber Singular Plural 1st person I we 1st person my, mine our, ours 2nd person you you 2nd person 3rd person he, she, it they your, yours your, yours 3rd person his, her, hers, its their, theirs Personal pronouns, objective case Reflexive/Intensive pronouns Person/num ber Singular Plural Person/num ber Singula r Plural 1st person me us 1st person myself ourselves 2nd person you you 2nd person yourself yourselves 3rd person him, her, it them 3rd person himself, herself, itself themselve s
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Getting Started Welcome to Williams. When you get to campus, you’ll have a list of things to do and, inevitably, many decisions to make about what you’ll buy. This section offers advice about budgeting for some of your bigger expenses: books, computers, and communication. 1) Books 1) If you’re on financial aid your books are paid for by Williams as long as you buy them from Water Street Books (the ONLY book store that the financial aid office acknowledges). Course packets and most art studio fees are also covered by Williams’ book grant. You can’t be reimbursed for books bought from online sources or other bookstores. And you must ONLY buy books for courses that you’re actually enrolled in. About a week prior to the start of classes, you’ll be notified that you may purchase your books at Water Street Books by simply swiping your ID card. Doing so will charge the book purchases to your student term bill, which will then be covered by college grants once your enrollment in each course is verified. The grant applied to your student term bill will cover the TOTAL amount paid for your books and course packets. YOU THEN OWN THESE MATERIALS and are free to sell, donate, or keep these books at the end of the semester. For more information visit: http://finaid.williams.edu/announcements/#book_grant 2) If you’re not on financial aid, you can buy used books instead of new books at Water Street Books. This will cost you less money, and you may even get lucky and inherit a book from someone who was a great highlighter. You can also participate in the book rental system through Water Street Books, which allows you to rent the books for the year, instead of buying them. You may charge your books with your student ID, and the costs will then be added to your term bill and can be paid at a later date. 3) Buy your books online. As long as you don’t mind waiting a few days for shipping, you can save anywhere from 50%-70% per book. On the next page, there is a list of websites that sell textbooks at discount prices.
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Stuff!         Not only, but also A lot A bunch A great deal So (so that, and, very, therefore) You (second person pronouns) Indefinite pronouns Your/You’re
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Not only, but also • A lot • A bunch • A great deal • So (so that, and, very, therefore) • You (second person pronouns) • Indefinite pronouns •Your/You’re •
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