24 Functions are not Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods F are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions
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Harter’s Self-Perception Profile For Children Really True for me Sort of True for me Other kids worry about Some kids feel that whether they can do the they are very good BUT school work assigned to at their school work them Some kids find it hard to make friends Really True for me BUT Other kids find it’s pretty easy to make friends Other kids don’t feel that Some kids do very well at all kinds of BUT they are very good when to comes to sports sports Some kids are BUT happy with the way they look Some kids often do not like the BUT way they behave Other kids are not happy with the way they look Other kids usually like the way they behave Sort of True for me
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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Not All 20 Point Fonts Are Equal 20  A - Can You Read B - Can You Read C - Can You Read D - Can You Read E - Can You Read F - Can You Read G - Can You Read H - Can You Read I - Can You Read 16  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 14  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read 12  J - Can You Read K - Can You Read L - Can You Read M - Can You Read N - Can You Read O - Can You Read P - Can You Read Q - Can You Read R - Can You Read My Students Tell Me That They Like The Readability Of Ariel Font I never use fonts smaller than 20 point for lecture.
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Separation Andrea Dworkin Night is magical for men. They look for prostitutes and pick-ups at night. They do their so-called lovemaking at night. They get drunk and roam the streets in packs at night. They fuck their wives at night. They have their fraternity parties at night. They commit their so-called seductions at night. They dress up in white sheets and burn crosses at night.... Any hated group fears the night, because in the night all the despised are treated as women are treated: as prey, targeted to be beaten or murdered or sexually violated. We fear the night because men become more dangerous in the night. Seduction is often difficult to distinguish from rape. In seduction, the rapist often bothers to buy a bottle of wine. Copyright © 2015 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education.
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 I’m sorry, but I just do not have anyone who can watch my kids at night. When you are able to schedule a time to meet with me, just let me know.
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Childhood Cancer      CA is relatively rare, but accounts for largest # of disease-related deaths under 16 1/600 kids get cancer. 1/3 of these will not survive. To check CA cells, kids may have to undergo bone marrow aspiration or spinal tap As a result, we see a lot of anticipatory anxiety—nausea, vomiting, insomnia, crying days before—takes a long time to learn to cope with it Factors related to controlling pain and anxiety – Distress in kids under 7 is much higher than older kids (studies est. 510x) – Kids with terminal CA are less tolerant – Approachers deal better than avoiders – Strong relationship between child and parent distressparents who emphasize coping rather than being anxious or overly solicitous have kids who do better – Kids cry more when parents are present, but report that it helps them through—may feel like they can let go a bit
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43 IRB 101: TIP #8 dealing with risk and disclosure - examples While you are in this study, you may feel upset about something we ask you. If something that you talk about makes you feel upset, we will give you the name of someone who can help you. You may be worried that something you say will not be kept private. We use a code number for each person in the study. We never use your name. The interviewer will never give any personal information about you to anyone. The only time the interviewer would tell anyone about you, is if you or your baby were in danger. That means things like child abuse or sexual abuse. When we talk about the study, we will ONLY talk about the entire group of girls and babies in this study. No one, except your social worker or the person who gives you the services will know that you are in the study. * courtesy of Dr. Lisa Lieberman During this interview, we will ask you some questions about your age, who you live with, whether you are married or single, if you use drugs, if you have HIV and if you have any other medical problems. We will note down your answer to these questions. Your answers could be risky outside of this research because it could get you arrested, or you could lose your job, or your reputation. But, we will make every effort to make sure that your information is kept private. We will conduct the interview in a private room at _____. We will never share your personal information with anyone outside of the research. If any of the questions make you uncomfortable, with your permission, we will refer you to your counselor or case manager who can assist you. *courtesy of Dr. Meena Mahadevan
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E-mail #3 August 11, 2016 Dear Students in BMGT 2501, Beginnings are so important, so I just want to be sure that we all start of the semester in a strong fashion. By now, you should have acquired your copy of Schermerhorn, 11th edition. This is an older edition of the textbook, and the bookstore, as I indicated in my earlier email on this, is unlikely to be able to stock it. So, you will have to rely on the online purchase of it. So, if you have not acquired the text, do so quickly to save yourself unnecessary stress as the semester begins. I have checked with our IT personnel, as is my practice, to ensure that all of my emails were delivered and that there were no snags in the SHU network. Delivery has been confirmed. Thank you to the several of you who indicated that they did not receive the hard-copy mailing. Your notice to me of its nonreceipt was due on August 8, so if you still have not received the mailing, you have to let me know. Be aware that not a single mailing has been returned to me “undeliverable,” so the materials are resting in a mailbox somewhere! Even so, I shall resend the packet to you, but you have to let me know right away. Otherwise, you jeopardize meeting the first day of class assignment. Know that I am on campus daily, so if you want to pick up your packet here on campus, let me know. I’ll tape your packet to my office door (Jubilee 686), and you can get what you need in this way. Regards, Karen Borof
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Required Information in Incurred Cost Submission FAR 52.2167(d)(2)(iii) (referenced to ICE model) Schedule A Summary of Indirect Expense Rates Schedule B, C, D Indirect Cost Pools Schedule E Claimed Allocation Bases Schedule F Cost of Money Schedule G Booked and Claimed Direct Costs Schedule H Direct Costs by Contract at Claimed Rates Schedule H-1 Government Participation by Pool Schedule I Cumulative Allowable Cost Worksheet Schedule J Subcontract Information Schedule K Hours and Amounts on T&M Contracts Schedule L Payroll Reconciliation Schedule M Accounting/Organization Changes Schedule N Certificate of Indirect Costs Schedule O Contract Closing Information 105
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Example: Define Dependencies (after 1 of 2) Changed one association to a dependency relationship. (This change discussed on ‘next’ slide) Here, during a registration session, the Registration Controller works with a single Student, the registrant, and one Schedule, the current Schedule for the Student. <> These instances need to be accessed by ICourseCatalogSystem more than one of the Registration Controller’s, (from External System Interfaces) operations so Field Visibility is chosen + getCourseOfferings(forSemester : Semester) : CourseOfferingList from Registration Controller Global visibility to Student and from Registration Controller <> <> Schedule to Schedule. RegistrationController (from University Artifacts) (from Registration) Thus relationships currentSchedule - semester remain + // submit schedule() 0..1+ submit() 0..1 + // save schedule() associations. + // save() + // create schedule with offerings() # any conflicts?() (more ‘permanent’) + // getCourseOfferings(forSemester) : CourseOfferingList Field + // create with offerings() A Student manages his/her own Schedules, so Field visibility is chosen from Student to Schedule – and relation remains aggregation. Again, more ‘permanent.’ 0..* 0..1 registrant - name - address - StudentID : int Field visibility 1 0..1 <> Student (from University Artifacts) see Schedule as parameter below + addSchedule(theSchedule : Schedule, forSemester : Semester) + getSchedule(forSemester : Semester) : Schedule + hasPrerequisites(forCourseOffering : CourseOffering) : boolean # passed(theCourseOffering : CourseOffering) : boolean 35 More  0..* alternateCourses 0..2 0..* primaryCourses 0..4 <> CourseOffering (from University Artifacts) - number : String = "100" - startTime : Time - endTime : Time - days : Enum + addStudent(studentSchedule : Schedule) + removeStudent(studentSchedule : Schedule) + new() + setData() 36 Parameter visibility see Course Offering in Student as parameter
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