Strategic Innovation Initiatives: COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Initiative Action Step Action Step Action Step Target Start Current Gain Year 1 Gain Year 2 Gain Year 3 First Year Retention Analysis of Attrition Patterns Case Management Process Improve weekly reporting tools Spring 2013 61% FY retained fall to fall (240/393) 65% (260/400) (+20 over current) 70% (280/400) (+40 over current) 75% (300/400) (+60 over current) Forensic Science Introductory Course Market Analysis Curriculum Development Intro Course Sp. 2013 New Major Fall 2013 0 10 20 30 Luce Program Leverage Luce Scholarships Create more distinctive Luce program focus Partner with area Luce universities 2012-2013 Media Studies Market analysis for new major Hire faculty leaders (SPS and CAS) Develop and market new program Fall 2013 0 15 30 45 Criminal Justice Create strategic program plan Hire new faculty aligned with new program tracks Improve marketing of program Fall 2013 26 majors + 10 36 majors + 20 56 majors + 20 76 majors Psychology Create strategic program plan Clarify program links to Nursing, Grad Studies Align personnel capacity with growth tracks Fall 2013 22 majors +10 32 majors +20 52 majors +20 72 majors Human Relations Create strategic program plan Identify cluster areas linking with Nursing interests Align personnel capacity with clusters Fall 2013 54 majors +20 74 majors +20 94 majors +20 114 majors International Affairs Create strategic program plan Identify areas of global emphasis and links with other disciplines Align personnel capacity with areas of emphasis Fall 2013 12 majors +10 22 majors +20 42 majors +25 67 majors Business Administration Create strategic program plan Identify links with regional business and clinical opportunities Align personnel capacity with areas of emphasis Fall 2013 33 majors +10 43 majors +20 63 majors +25 85 majors 17
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To Be or Not To Be….On the 21-Meal Plan All first-years are required to be on the 21-meal plan. However, beginning in the fall of your sophomore year, you are given the option to either remain on the 21-meal plan or reduce your plan and pay less according to which meal plan you select. The reduced meal plans still allow you an active dining hall social life but save you money. So, if you’re a granola bar or cereal breakfast-type person and you want to save money, consider converting your full-board meal plan to a 14-meal plan. This plan is still pretty flexible and allows you to eat lunch and dinner at a dining hall every day of the week. You can take care of breakfast by planning ahead…by taking a piece of fruit, or a cup of milk (for your cereal) each night from the dining hall. Another option is the 10-meal plan. This plan assumes that you will not be eating all lunches and dinners in the dining halls. Therefore, you must truly plan on shopping for food and cooking. Many people opt for the 10-meal plan because it costs a lot less. But you must remember that this money is YOUR FOOD BUDGET FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR, not money for you to spend on other things, as tempting or as necessary as they may be. Students have made this mistake and ended up literally having to mooch off others for food. Your best money-saving bet (since local grocery can be more expensive than you think) and time-saving (since, yes, cooking every day requires having the time to do so, and Williams Students have VERY LITTLE free time as it is), is just to stay on the 21-or 14-meal plan and avoid making a serious mistake altogether. Talk to upperclassman if you want some other perspectives on what meal plan makes most sense for you. If you truly want to drop down to a reduced meal plan after your first year, check out the meal plans and costs on the dining services website: http://dining.williams.edu/meal-plans/ Changes can only be made twice a year; in fall and winter. Check for exact dates on the website. Then contact dining services at (413) 597-2121.
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Strategic Innovation Initiatives: COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Initiative Action Step Action Step Action Step Target Start Current Gain Year 1 Gain Year 2 Gain Year 3 First Year Retention Implementation of case management approach Create Center for Academic Success, including case management and attention to Center for Success in Foundational Teaching (Fall 2014-Spring 2015) Transitioning firstyear advising to all Professional Advisors, with new emphasis on Summer Orientation that includes dedicated programming for transitioning first-year Ongoing with specific start dates for each action step 54% FY retained fall to fall (162/297); 89% retained Fall 13 to Spring 14 65% (260/400) (+20 over current) 70% (280/400) (+40 over current) 75% (300/400) (+60 over current) Early Childhood Education Institutional Approvals Recruit for Major, including dedicated programming fro Accepted Students Launch initiative including intensive focus on local partnerships Fall 2014 0 (44 students identified as intending to major in Education) 15 20 30 Science Pedagogy Leverage Luce Program Relationships Emphasize undergraduate research opportunities with faculty as appropriate (running classes each semester; students presenting) Support expansion of innovative science pedagogies, including interdisciplinary work with Business, Forensic Science, Writing Fall 2013 4 Luce Student Scholars 2013-2014; 35 Science majors +10 (45 majors) +10 (55 majors) +15 (70 majors) Psychology / Counseling Cluster Launch new Human Relations programming Launch CAS Psychology program to EDU Counseling program articulation Aggressively recruit students with particular interest in dual degree Fall 2014 124 (75 HUMR majors; 49 PSYC majors) + 10 (134 majors) +15 (149 majors) +20 (169 majors) International Affairs Create strategic program plan incorporating interdisciplinary approaches involving political science, history, and social sciences Create glide path for master’s level programming at Trinity Develop and market re-envisioned major Fall 2014 15 majors +10 (25 majors) +20 (45 majors) +25 (70 majors) Emphasis on Excellence: Succeeding at Trinity Continue building Honors program and opportunities for curricular initiatives of excellence Create and sustain Undergraduate Research Focus Group Emphasize opportunities for advanced academic and experiential initiatives working with Career Services and Experiential Learning Fall 2014 53 +10 (63 Honors students) +15 (78 Honors students) +20 (98 Honors students) Business Administration Create strategic program plan Identify links with regional business and clinical opportunities Align possibilities with BGS Fall 2014 45 majors +10 55 majors +20 75 majors +25 100 majors 55
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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