Leave Overview for Staff Sick, vacation, and bonus leave SICK LEAVE VACATION LEAVE BONUS LEAVE • Full-time staff also earn eight (8) hours of sick leave per month. • Full-time staff earn vacation leave according to longevity with the state of NC: • 0-4 years: 9.34 hrs (14 days) • 5-9 years: 11.34 hrs (17 days) • 10-14 years: 13.34 hrs (20 days) • 15-19 years: 15.34 hrs (23 days) • 20+ years: 17.34 hrs (26 days) • Bonus leave is sometimes granted during the same time as raise adjustments are made. • Maximum allowed vacation leave carryover for the new calendar year is 240 hours. Excess rolls over to sick leave. • Sometimes bonus leave is granted as Special Vacation Leave (SVL) leave and does have use restrictions, such as an expiration date of the leave and no payout upon termination. • Sick leave is used for medical appointments, illness of an employee or immediate family member, or death of immediate family. . • Sick leave is transferable to other NC state agencies but is not paid out when an employee leaves. There is no maximum annual balance for sick leave. • Vacation leave is paid out if the employee leaves the college. • Sometimes bonus leave is used like vacation without use restrictions. The Handbook outlines other types of leave, such as School, Educational, Military, Civil and Shared Leave, as well as leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act.
View full slide show




Leave Overview for Staff Sick, vacation, and bonus leave SICK LEAVE VACATION LEAVE BONUS LEAVE • Full-time staff also earn eight (8) hours of sick leave per month. • Full-time staff earn vacation leave according to longevity with the state of NC: • 0-4 years: 9.34 hrs (14 days) • 5-9 years: 11.34 hrs (17 days) • 10-14 years: 13.34 hrs (20 days) • 15-19 years: 15.34 hrs (23 days) • 20+ years: 17.34 hrs (26 days) • Bonus leave is sometimes granted during the same time as raise adjustments are made. • Maximum allowed vacation leave carryover for the new calendar year is 240 hours. Excess rolls over to sick leave. • Sometimes bonus leave is granted as Special Vacation Leave (SVL) leave and does have use restrictions, such as an expiration date of the leave and no payout upon termination. • Sick leave is used for medical appointments, illness of an employee or immediate family member, or death of immediate family. . • Sick leave is transferable to other NC state agencies but is not paid out when an employee leaves. There is no maximum annual balance for sick leave. • Vacation leave is paid out if the employee leaves the college. • Sometimes bonus leave is used like vacation without use restrictions. The Handbook outlines other types of leave, such as School, Educational, Military, Civil and Shared Leave, as well as leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act.
View full slide show




Leave approvals* Action Scope Delegated Authority Monash System Notification mechanism Approval of annual leave, personal leave, pre-natal leave, 48/52 leave (and variants) and conference leave All staff Supervisor ESS Notification email from “Batch Account for System Jobs”. Approval of compassionate leave (up to 5 days) All staff Supervisor Authorise an Application for Leave F orm Approval of compassionate leave (greater than 5 days), long service leave and study leave All staff Dean or Divisional Director Authorise an Application for Leave F orm Approval of parental leave All staff Dean or Divisional Director Authorise a Maternity Leave Applica tion Form Approval of long service leave All staff Dean or Divisional Director Authorise an Application for Leave F orm Approval to convert leave loading to additional holidays All staff Supervisor Authorise an Application for Exchang e of Annual Leave for E xtra Leave Form Access the Workflow screen in ESS to authorise. *Note: All other forms of leave require Executive Director (Monash HR) or senior management approval. 8
View full slide show




Advanced Leave Advanced Annual Leave: • • Annual leave may be advanced to an employee in the amount not to exceed the amount the employee would accrue within the leave year. Advanced annual leave is liquidated by subsequently earned annual leave or by payment upon separation from Federal service. Advanced Sick Leave: • • • Sick leave may be advanced to an employee for the same reason it grants sick leave. 240 hours is the maximum amount of advanced sick leave a full-time employee may request. Request for advanced sick leave is essentially a request for sick leave, therefore, the medical documentation requirements for granting sick leave apply. • Managers should NOT advance annual or sick leave to an employee when it is known (or reasonably expected) that the employee will not return to duty. All advanced leave requests must route through HRO for final approval prior to submission to timekeeping. Timekeeping Codes: LB (Advanced Annual Leave) LG (Advanced Sick Leave) • • * Visit http://my.nps.edu/web/hro/absence-leave for Request for Advance Leave form which outlines routing/approval process.
View full slide show




Leave Overview for Faculty Sick leave and faculty leave SICK LEAVE FACULTY LEAVE • Full-time faculty earn eight (8) hours of sick leave per month. • Faculty are generally not scheduled to be on campus when classes are not in session. • Sick leave is used for medical appointments, illness of an employee or immediate family member, or death of immediate family. • Full-time faculty earn two days of faculty leave per year. • Sick leave is transferable to other NC state agencies but is not paid out when an employee leaves. CFCC accepts sick leave transfers from other NC state agencies. • Sick leave is exhausted in multiples of an 8 hour day. • Example: If you are scheduled to teach 4 classes and miss 1 class, you will be charged ¼ of an 8 hour day, or 2 hours of sick leave. • Faculty leave can be used for personal business that cannot be attended to outside the normal work day. • Faculty leave does not accumulate and does not carry-over year to year. Faculty leave must be approved by the supervisor. • You may use increments. See the handbook for the detailed leave exhaustion policy for faculty. Faculty Leave in partial
View full slide show




Leave Overview for Faculty Sick leave and faculty leave SICK LEAVE FACULTY LEAVE • Full-time faculty earn eight (8) hours of sick leave per month. • Faculty are generally not scheduled to be on campus when classes are not in session. • Sick leave is used for medical appointments, illness of an employee or immediate family member, or death of immediate family. • Full-time faculty earn two days of faculty leave per year. • Sick leave is transferable to other NC state agencies but is not paid out when an employee leaves. CFCC accepts sick leave transfers from other NC state agencies. • Sick leave is exhausted in multiples of an 8 hour day. • Example: If you are scheduled to teach 4 classes and miss 1 class, you will be charged ¼ of an 8 hour day, or 2 hours of sick leave. • Faculty leave can be used for personal business that cannot be attended to outside the normal work day. • Faculty leave does not accumulate and does not carry-over year to year. Faculty leave must be approved by the supervisor. • You may use increments. See the handbook for the detailed leave exhaustion policy for faculty. Faculty Leave in partial
View full slide show




Closed Area Checklist - Idea Closed Areas Interview Guide ___Is the media in the area marked properly? (classified, unclassified, and system software) ___Are both classified and unclassified computer equipment affixed with a label indicating their level of processing? ___ Review the visitor log. Pay close attention to the visitor’s company name. Did someone visit from an HVAC service? If so, ask the area custodian what they did. Did they put a hole in the wall or make a change affecting the area integrity or the 147? If so, is it greater than 96 square inches? Did someone visit from Xerox? If so, what did they do while they were there? Did they install a new copy machine with a hard drive? Did this get connected to the classified AIS? Did someone visit from a computer service vendor? If so, what did they do? Did they bring diagnostic equipment with them? If so, did they connect it to the AIS? Did any visitors have “keyboard” access? If so, was that authorized? Dispose of visitor logs from before the last DSS audit ____ Does the 147 note “open storage” of AIS? ____ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Dispose of system paperwork from before the last DSS audit (unless it is still relevant) ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Look around. Is there any new hardware connected to the AIS? If so, what is it? Does it have memory? ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Check the AIS system access list. Are all individuals still active employees? Balance the list against an active employee listing. Bring a list of recently terminated employees with you, too. Are all individuals on the system access list also on the Closed Area access list? If not, why not? Review the Closed Area access list. Do you see anyone who recently terminated? If so, request that they be taken off the Closed Area access list. Were they on the system access list? If so, has their account been disabled? Balance all the lists against each other. Has everyone on the system access list taken the required CBEs? (Verify.) ___ Are there Security posters in the area? ____ Are the FAX machines in the area marked to indicate “for unclassified use only”? ____ Are the shredders marked “for unclassified use only”? ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Do the classified printers have a sign “Output must be treated as classified until reviewed ….?” ___ Are the recycle bins labeled “for unclassified use only”? ____ Are the supplies in the area sufficient? (CD labels, classification labels, coversheets, etc.). ___ Does the area have a “marking guide” poster? ____ Does the area have an updated Security points of contact poster? __ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Before going to audit the system, read about what the system is used for and what it does. This will generate questions and help you understand what goes on in the area ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Have a user walk you through the steps they follow when they create classified data. What do they print out? Is it classified? If it’s not classified, do they verify that? How do they know what’s classified? (Do they refer to the program security classification guide? Do they know where the guide is located?) Where do they put the classified when it’s completed? Go look at their safe. Are things marked properly? Ask if the data in the safe is for a current contract. If not, explain the requirements for retention approval. (See NISPOM 5-701) Where does the data or hardware go from there? Is it sent to a customer? What is our relationship with the organization they send it to? Do we have DD Forms 254 in place to/from that organization? What is the classification of what they are working on? Is the system approved up to that level? ___ Do they support IR&D activities? If so, explain how IR&D documents must be marked “IR&D Document,” etc. in accordance with the NISPOM (11-304) ____ Are the above-the-ceiling checks being conducted on the required schedule? Look at the records. Dispose of records from before the last DSS audit __ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Review Trusted Download logs, ask people where the removed media is currently located (stored on a computer, CD, printout), and which method they used for the transfer. DSS is focusing on interviews with employees and may very well ask them to actually demonstrate a trusted download. Ask the employee to walk through the steps with you to prepare them for the audit.
View full slide show




New Compensatory Time Policy 5.5 Fair Labor Standards Act The Fair Labor Standards Act recognizes two basic categories of employees: • Exempt: Employees not covered by the act • Non-Exempt: Employees covered by the act If an employee’s position is classified as non-exempt, the normal work week is forty (40) hours. An employee is considered to have earned overtime when he/she has worked in excess of forty (40) hours in any work week. A regular work week consists of forty (40) hours (from 12:00 a.m., Saturday through 11:59 p.m., Friday). It is the policy of the University to arrange for all work to be completed within that period. It is recommended that prior authorization from the employee’s immediate supervisor and the department head be given before an employee works in excess of forty (40) hours per week. In determining the number of hours worked by an employee within a given work week, time spent on Annual Leave, Sick Leave and holidays will not be counted as time worked. Any leave or holiday time included in a work week that results in an excess of forty (40) hours is to be compensated at straight time rates only. After excluding holiday and leave time from the total hours worked, if there are still excess hours over forty (40), that time is to be compensated at time-and-a-half. If the manager determines that it is in the best interest of the University to give monetary compensation for the overtime worked, a Comp Time Payout Form along with documentation must be provided and approved by the department head and appropriate Vice President. The following actions are the preferred order for addressing the accumulation of compensatory time: • Supervisors should adjust work schedules and/or leave approval during the workweek to prevent the accumulation of compensatory time. • Supervisors may request or direct employees to use their compensatory time during a period of time that has minimal impact on the work unit’s operations. The action may be taken to reduce the accrued compensatory time balance and avoid cash payments. • Employees must exhaust all accrued compensatory time before use of annual leave. • Employees may also use compensatory time in lieu of sick leave. The Fair Labor Standards Act limits the amount of compensatory time most employees can accrue up to 240 hours. Note: Requests by employees for use of Compensatory Leave Time are handled in the same manner as requests for Annual Leave. Departments will work with employees to schedule Compensatory Leave Time that meets the employee’s needs and least interrupts the duties for the department. Unused Compensatory Time will be paid upon termination of employment.
View full slide show




FML & Parental Leave FAQs • • • • Is Family Medical Leave paid or unpaid? – During the time that an employee is on leave for a FMLA reason, he/she must exhaust all APPLICABLE sick leave and vacation. Once that is exhausted, the employee will be placed on Leave Without Pay for the remainder of the 12 weeks. Employee will be responsible for paying the insurance that they normally have deducted from their paychecks (i.e., cost of coverage for dependents, longterm disability insurance, etc.). Premium sharing available. Can I choose to exhaust my own paid leave prior to beginning FMLA leave? – No, you cannot choose to exhaust your own paid leave prior to beginning FMLA leave. The UT Dallas’ Administrative Policies and Procedures (D6-155.0) require you to use your available paid leave when you are missing work due to an FMLArelated reason. Exceptions: FMLA leave due to an on-the-job injury will have option to use available paid leave or being in a leave without pay status; you are not required to FLSA comp time but have option to do so. What other payments are available during FML/Parental leave ? – Short Term Disability and/or Long Term Disability , if coverage is elected – Sick Leave Pool – must apply separately and qualify as catastrophic Link to more FAQs - ( https://www.utdallas.edu/hrm/benefits/lifeevents/famlvfaq.php5)
View full slide show




Statutory Leave                   Following are the citations for leaves designated by the Legislature. These leaves are subject to change or repeal.                                             3.088 Leave of Absence to Serve as a Legislator or For Election to a Full-time City or County Office 15.62 Athletic Leave of Absence       43A.185 Disaster Volunteer Leave       43A.32 Leaves of Absence for Classified Employees Who Become Elected Public Officials or Candidates 181.940 - 181.943 Parenting Leave, School Conference and Activities Leave, and Sick Child Care Leave 181.945 Bone Marrow Donation Leave       181.946 Leave for Civil Air Patrol Service       181.947 Leave for Immediate Family Members of Military Personnel Injured or Killed in Active Service 181.948 Leave to Attend Military Ceremonies       192.26, 192.261 Military Service Leave       202A.135 Leave Time from Employment; Party Officers; Delegates to Party Conventions 202A.19 Precinct Caucus Leave       204B.195 Time Off From Work to Serve as Election Judge 204C.04 Time Off to Vote in a State Primary Election, a Presidential Primary Election, or an Election to Fill a Vacancy in the Office of United States Senator or United States Representative
View full slide show




21 New Questions Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have enough food Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have health care Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have a place to live Most people who are poor waste a lot of their time The poor are treated the same as everyone else The poor have the same opportunity for success as everyone else The poor face challenges that are the same as everyone else Governments should do more to help the poor Charities should do more to help the poor Businesses should do more to help the poor  Individuals should do more to help the poor  Lack of transportation is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of social support (family, friends, church) is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of education is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of child care is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of self-control is a major challenge for the poor  It upsets me to know that many people are poor  I feel that I know what it is like to be poor  I feel that I understand why someone may be poor  I feel that I have enough direct experience with the poor  I feel that I could personally make 
View full slide show




Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
View full slide show




 Librarians are unique when it comes to their leave: they are considered faculty with regards to their leave, however their leave works differently than that of faculty or staff. Although, like faculty, Librarians receive personal leave and are entitled to bank time.  For Librarians, there are a total of 28 FNWD days (210 Hours); this is the 23 during the 9 months plus the 5 for the week of the 4th of July. At the beginning of the Academic Year in August, we take the 210 hours and subtract all the days (hours) the College is closed for the Academic Year. The remaining hours are granted to Librarians as Personal Leave. Of those personal leave hours, in September of each year, HR automatically banks 22.50 hours.  The balance in your FNWD Bank for the current Academic Year will roll over into the new Academic Year. As we move into the new Academic Year, HR will once again take the 28 FNWD (210.00 hours) subtract the hours the College will be closed during that new Academic Year and the remaining balance will be applied to your personal leave. In September we will automatically bank 22.50 of those personal leave hours for you. Please note, any unused personal leave at the end of each Academic Year will be forfeited. Regarding banking time, please note, the maximum amount of personal leave that can be banked during an Academic Year is 37.50 hours. As HR automatically banks 22.50 hours for you each year in September, you can bank up to an additional 15 hours for a total of 37.5 hours. You can bank those additional 15 hours on a FNWD and/or administrative day as identified in the Academic Calendar, so long as the college is open; i.e. you can’t bank time when the College is closed, for example Labor Day.  Time in your FNWD Bank can roll from Academic Year to Academic Year, up to a maximum of 45 days (337.50 hours). LIBRARIANS
View full slide show




SICK LEAVE / PERSONAL LEAVE Full-Time employees earn 1 day per month for sick leave. Upon employment, all full-time employees are credited the first (9) days of sick leave. Reimbursement for unused sick leave will not be issued at the time of termination based on College policy. Sick leave hours are used for bereavement leave. Personal Leave – Full-time employees are entitled to four (4) days per fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) for personal leave. This leave is deducted from accrued sick leave and is not cumulative.
View full slide show




Paid Leave       Type of Leave         Classified - Bargaining Unit           Unclassified - Bargaining Unit AFSCME MAPE MANAGERIAL MMA MNA COM Bereavement (Classified deducted from sick) X X X X X X Court Appearance X X X X X X Education if required by supervisor X X X X X X Jury Duty X X X X X X   X X X Military/Reserve (also refer to Statutory Leaves) X X X   X X   X X X Voting Time X X X X X X     Emergency X X X     X   Blood Donation X X X     X     Election Judge (also refer to Statutory Leaves) X X X     X     Transition Leave X X X X   X       Investigatory X X Depends on case   X X       Paid Administrative X X X X X X       Personal Leave             Vacation Leave X X X X X X     Sick Leave X X X X X X   X X X Family Medical Leave (FMLA)up to 480hrs must exhaust sick leave, vacation is optional X X X X X X   X X X Adoption (Deducted from sick leave) 5 days 5 days 5 days 5 days 5 days 5 days     X   Accompany parent(s) medical/dental appts (deducted 24hrs 24hrs 24hrs 24hrs 24hrs 24hrs         Paid Leave of Absence - Retraining               Annual                   local only X                     X               ARTICLE Article 10 Article 14 Article 6 Article 10 Article 10 Chapter 6   Article 17 Article 18   SECTION Section 4 Section 3   Section 4 Section A - Section B, C, E - 1.06 E&G K from sick leave) Attend Labor Management Meetings Athletic-World, Olympic or Pan American             MSUAASF ADMIN X X X X X X         X     IFO X X     X X X X     X   X   X       X
View full slide show




EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)  Paid Time Off      Everyone who is an employee, no matter how old they are or what kind of job they do, becomes entitled to four weeks annual holidays after one year of continuous employment.  This includes part time, seasonal and casual employees. If you’ve been employed for more than six months at one time, you’re entitled to five days’ sick leave. Most people are entitled to sick leave whether they’re full-time or part-time, permanent or fixed-term employees as long as they’ve worked for six months or more in their job. You need to have been employed for more than six months at one time to get bereavement leave if someone close to you dies. If an immediate family member dies like your parents, grandparents, brother or sister, the minimum amount of paid bereavement leave you can have is three days. The current 14 weeks’ of paid parental leave will be increased in two stages - from 1 April 2015 paid parental leave will increase to 16 weeks and from 1 April 2016 leave provisions will be extended to 18 weeks. For babies born on or after 1 April 2015, the Government will increase the parental tax credit from $150 a week to $220 a week, and extend the payment period from eight weeks to 10 weeks.
View full slide show




Voluntary Leave Transfer Program (VLTP) • Employees may donate annual leave directly to another employee who has a personal or family medical emergency and who has exhausted available paid leave. • To be eligible for consideration for enrollment: • Submit Application to Become a Leave Recipient which includes certification regarding the medical emergency from one or more physicians to HRO through supervisor. • Medical emergency is a medical condition of employee or employee’s family member that is likely to require the employee to be absent from duty for a prolonged period and will result in a substantial lose of income because of the lack of available paid leave. • Absence from duty without available paid leave because of medical emergency is (or is expected to be) at least 24 work hours. • Leave recipient may only use donated annual leave for purposes related to the medical emergency for which the leave recipient was approved. • Annual leave transferred under VLTP may be substituted retroactively for any period of LWOP because of the medical emergency or used to liquidate indebtedness incurred for advanced annual or sick leave used because of medical emergency.
View full slide show




Leave and Overtime USPS Exempt to non-exempt effective 11/18/2016 • Grandfathered group • 6.77 to 6.00 annual leave hours (new) • Maximum payout - 352 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 352 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday (new) • Bereavement Leave (new) • Eligible for overtime pay (new) • New hires (current structure) • 4.00, 5.00 or 6.00 hours annual leave hours based on years of service • Maximum payout - 240 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 240 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday • Bereavement Leave • Eligible for overtime pay
View full slide show




Leave and Overtime Continued A&P Exempt to non-exempt effective 11/18/2016 • Grandfathered group • 6.77 to 6.00 annual leave hours (new) • Maximum payout - 352 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 352 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday (new) • Bereavement Leave (new) • Eligible for overtime pay (new) • New hires (new structure) • 6.00 hours annual leave hours Maximum payout - 240 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 352 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday • Bereavement Leave • Eligible for overtime pay
View full slide show




Leave and Overtime Continued A&P Exempt to non-exempt effective 11/18/2016 • Grandfathered group • 6.77 to 6.00 annual leave hours (new) • Maximum payout - 352 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 352 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday (new) • Bereavement Leave (new) • Eligible for overtime pay (new) • New hires (new structure) • 6.00 hours annual leave hours • Maximum payout - 352 annual leave hours • Year End Rollover – in excess of 352 annual leave hours rolls into sick leave balance • Personal Holiday • Bereavement Leave • Eligible for overtime pay
View full slide show