Tuesday Thursday Saturday Friday Sunday Thursday Sunday Sunday Saturday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Friday Monday Saturday Wednesday Tuesday Monday Monday Wednesday Monday Monday Thursday Friday 113 113 Saturday Friday Friday Tuesday Monday Sunday Sunday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Monday Saturday Saturday Tuesday Sunday Wednesday Monday Sunday Thursday Monday Thursday Tuesday 1336 0718 0803 0111 1138 0118 1317 1916 1032 0632 1458 1957 2131 0237 1308 1536 1516 1715 0150 0823 1717 0549 0340 0759 1532 Saturday Sunday Wednesday Tuesday Thursday Wednesday Sunday Thursday Sunday Tuesday Thursday Thursday Thursday Saturday Sunday Tuesday Thursday Sunday Tuesday Thursday Saturday Friday Thursday Saturday Tuesday 1021 1039 0705 1016 0806 0823 1427 2256 1734 1316 0645 0737 0321 0503 1118 1300 2010 2301 0431 0210 1928 0628 1606 1711 2119 Monday Thursday Sunday Tuesday Saturday Wednesday Sunday Saturday Monday Wednesday Sunday Tuesday Wednesday Friday Saturday Monday Wednesday Wednesday Sunday Tuesday Saturday Friday Friday Friday Thursday 1342 0601 1053 0945 0305 0704 1110 0541 0520 0636 1406 1612 0700 1501 0633 0330 0943 1129 0436 1731 1500 1325 1631 1311 1850 0116 1331 1125 0010 0439 2128 1342 2109 2144 1709 0741 0157 1744 1025 0212 1719 2303 1708 2047 1326 1839 2056 1443 0907 16 17 0634 16 17 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 11 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- SUNDAY: SUNDAY: 112 112 139 139 121 121 127 127 126 126 105 105 104 104 119 119 116 116 124 124 113 113 132 132 119 119 118 118 116 116 105 105 123 123 118 118 131 131 131 131 105 105 102 102 129 129 109 109 134 134 116 116 124 124 116 116 116 116 111 111 118 118 111 111 132 132 134 134 113 113 128 128 108 108 141 141 119 119 108 108 122 122 115 115 106 106 126 126 118 118 138 138 134 134 117 117 121 121 91 91 123 123 118 118 125 125 104 104 142 142 130 130 130 130 101 101 118 118 126 126 127 127 111 111 124 124 111 111 121 121 116 116 135 135 134 134 110 110 90 90 129 129 138 138 117 117 127 127 116 116 105 105 114 114 126 126 126 126 145 145 110 110 106 106 128 128 116 116 113 113 114 114 119 119 120 120 110 110 111 111 138 138 138 138 MONDAY: MONDAY: 110 110 TUESDAY: TUESDAY: 102 102 WEDNESDAY: WEDNESDAY: 136 136 THURSDAY: THURSDAY: 132 132 FRIDAY: FRIDAY: 127 127 SATURDAY: SATURDAY: 107 107 CHAPTER 8 – Multidimensional Arrays 12 12 Saturday Monday Tuesday Thursday Monday Friday Monday Saturday Saturday Saturday Wednesday Saturday Sunday Friday Saturday Saturday Tuesday Sunday Saturday Tuesday Thursday Thursday Wednesday Thursday 13 14 15 13Tuesday 14 15 0 0 23 23 ----- 2100 1116 0159 1339 1602 0156 0446 1816 0829 1414 0414 0310 2001 1201 1008 1830 1911 1921 2055 2354 1640 2359 0603 0801 1557 Friday 1905 Friday 0404 Thursday 2038 Wednesday 0419 Tuesday 1325 Monday 0537 Tuesday 1708 Monday 1503 Monday 2200 Wednesday 2126 Tuesday 2221 Thursday 2048 Monday 1910 Wednesday 0032 Monday 0823 Thursday 2305 Sunday 2216 Saturday 2029 Friday 0800 Monday 0841 Tuesday 0834 Monday 0407 20 21 22 20 21 22 Monday 0439 Tuesday 0737 ----- ----- ----Wednesday 1902 18 18 19 19 ----- ----- ----- 117 117 124 124 117 117 108 108 140 140 112 112 113 113 124 124 127 127 133 133 111 111 126 126 128 128 123 123 105 105 127 127 117 117 117 117 125 125 90 90 103 103 130 130 108 108 97 97 137 137 120 120 120 120 128 128 121 121 124 124 125 125 117 117 111 111 114 114 113 113 120 120 143 143 100 100 127 127 109 109 126 126 108 108 118 118 126 126 107 107 110 110 120 120 117 117 125 125 127 127 133 133 121 121 118 118 130 130 105 105 113 113 108 108 105 105 122 122 130 130 101 101 126 126 108 108 133 133 111 111 133 133 133 133 93 93 92 92 8
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Preamble “Post-amble” Block Execution: 3 Detail Observing Block Observing Block “Post-amble” “Post-amble” 3 Observing Block Observing Block ok Measurement Set ready “Post-amble” EVLA Data Processing PDR Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Failed! Preamble “Post-amble” Preamble ok ?4 5 Preamble ready Preamble Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Observing Block Observing Block Measurement Set “Post-amble” “Post-amble” Preamble Preamble “Post-amble” Measurement Set “Post-amble” “Post-amble” “Post-amble” July 18 - 19, 2002 2 2 Observing Observing Block Block Block Observing Observing Observing Block Block ok Archive: Preamble Observing Block Observing Block 34 ready Preamble “Post-amble” 1 3 Observing Block Observing Observing Block Block Observing Block Observing Observing Block Block ready Preamble Execution: Preamble ready Observing Observing Block Block Observing Observing Block Block Preamble Observing Block Observing Block 22 “Post-amble” “Post-amble” Preamble Preamble 1 “Post-amble” Preamble Input Queue: ok Measurement Set Boyd Waters 13
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The World’s Largest Non-U.S. Companies Table 4.2 The World’s Largest Non-U.S. Companies by Sales, Profits, and Number of Employees (2014) Company Sales ($millions) Profits ($billions) Employees Royal Dutch Shell 459,599 blank blank Sinopec 457,201 blank blank China Nat’l Petro. 432,007 blank blank BP 396,217 blank blank State Grid 333,386 blank blank Samsung Industrial and Commercial Bank of China blank 42.7 blank Gazprom blank 35.7 blank China Construction Bank blank 34.9 blank Samsung blank 27.2 blank Agricultural Bank of China blank 27.1 blank G4S plc blank blank 618,000 Randstad Holding NV blank blank 595,730 Volkswagen blank blank 555,097 PetroChina Co. Ltd. blank blank 544,083 Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/10/25/24-7-wall-st-most-profitable-companies/17707869/and http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/08/24/24-7-wall-st-biggest-employers/14443001/ Copyright © 2017, 2015, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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4-Year Plan ExerciseScience-Pre-Professional Fall I (16 cr.) SpringI (17 cr.) BIO 105 Gen Biology (Gen Ed) ENG 110 College Writing I HPR 105 Creating a Health Active Lifestyle Any MTH course at the 150 level or higher or CS 101 or CS 120 Arts Gen Ed—ART 102, ESS 104, MUS 105, THA 110, etc. CHM 103 General Chemistry I (Gen Ed) CST 110 Public Oral Communication ESS 100 Physical Activities—select a topic of interest ESS 201 First Aid, Safety and CPR Gen Ed Math course—MTH 145 Elem Statistics (Gen Ed and Pre-PT) Any 3-credit SOC course (SOC 225 Racial and Ethnic Minorities is a popular choice) Fall II (15 cr.) BIO 312 Human Anatomy & Physiology I CHM 104 General Chemistry II ENG 200-206 (Literature) HIS 101 The Global Past or 102 Global Transition and Change Fall III (17 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 207 Human Motor Behavior ESS 302 Exercise Physiology ESS 383 Clinical Pathology for Exercise Science PHY 103 Fundamental Physics I (Gen Ed) PSY 100 General Psychology or PSY 212 Lifespan Development or any 3credit PSY course transferred from another intuition satisfies the PSY requirement SpringII (15 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities BIO 313 Human Anatomy & Physiology II ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 281 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries ESS 303 Biomechanics Any BIO or MIC course excluding BIO 105, 312, and 313 (MIC 100 Microbes and Society is a popular choice) SpringIII (17 cr.) CHE 460 Medical Terminology for Health Ed. ESS 320 Field Experience in Exercise Science ESS 323 Nutrition and Sport PHY 104 Fundamental Physics II 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses Fall IV (12 cr.) SpringIV (13 cr.) Arts Gen Ed—2 course ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 368 Strength and Conditioning Techniques and Programs ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 446 Current Research and Trends in Exercise Science Internat’l Gen Ed #2 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses nd
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4-Year Plan ExerciseScience-Pre-Professional Fall I (16 cr.) SpringI (17 cr.) BIO 105 Gen Biology (Gen Ed) ENG 110 College Writing I HPR 105 Creating a Health Active Lifestyle Any MTH course at the 150 level or higher or CS 101 or CS 120 Arts Gen Ed—ART 102, ESS 104, MUS 105, THA 110, etc. CHM 103 General Chemistry I (Gen Ed) CST 110 Public Oral Communication ESS 100 Physical Activities—select a topic of interest ESS 201 First Aid, Safety and CPR Gen Ed Math course—MTH 145 Elem Statistics (Gen Ed and Pre-PT) Any 3-credit SOC course (SOC 225 Racial and Ethnic Minorities is a popular choice) Fall II (15 cr.) BIO 312 Human Anatomy & Physiology I CHM 104 General Chemistry II ENG 200-206 (Literature) HIS 101 The Global Past or 102 Global Transition and Change Fall III (17 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 207 Human Motor Behavior ESS 302 Exercise Physiology ESS 383 Clinical Pathology for Exercise Science PHY 103 Fundamental Physics I (Gen Ed) PSY 100 General Psychology or PSY 212 Lifespan Development or any 3credit PSY course transferred from another intuition satisfies the PSY requirement SpringII (15 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities BIO 313 Human Anatomy & Physiology II ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 281 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries ESS 303 Biomechanics Any BIO or MIC course excluding BIO 105, 312, and 313 (MIC 100 Microbes and Society is a popular choice) SpringIII (17 cr.) CHE 460 Medical Terminology for Health Ed. ESS 320 Field Experience in Exercise Science ESS 323 Nutrition and Sport PHY 104 Fundamental Physics II 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses Fall IV (12 cr.) SpringIV (13 cr.) Arts Gen Ed—2 course ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 368 Strength and Conditioning Techniques and Programs ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 446 Current Research and Trends in Exercise Science Internat’l Gen Ed #2 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses nd
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4-Year Plan ExerciseScience-Pre-Professional Fall I (16 cr.) SpringI (17 cr.) BIO 105 Gen Biology (Gen Ed) ENG 110 College Writing I HPR 105 Creating a Health Active Lifestyle Any MTH course at the 150 level or higher or CS 101 or CS 120 Arts Gen Ed—ART 102, ESS 104, MUS 105, THA 110, etc. CHM 103 General Chemistry I (Gen Ed) CST 110 Public Oral Communication ESS 100 Physical Activities—select a topic of interest ESS 201 First Aid, Safety and CPR Gen Ed Math course—MTH 145 Elem Statistics (Gen Ed and Pre-PT) Any 3-credit SOC course (SOC 225 Racial and Ethnic Minorities is a popular choice) Fall II (15 cr.) BIO 312 Human Anatomy & Physiology I CHM 104 General Chemistry II ENG 200-206 (Literature) HIS 101 The Global Past or 102 Global Transition and Change Fall III (17 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 207 Human Motor Behavior ESS 302 Exercise Physiology ESS 383 Clinical Pathology for Exercise Science PHY 103 Fundamental Physics I (Gen Ed) PSY 100 General Psychology or PSY 212 Lifespan Development or any 3credit PSY course transferred from another intuition satisfies the PSY requirement SpringII (15 cr.) ESS 100 Physical Activities BIO 313 Human Anatomy & Physiology II ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 281 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries ESS 303 Biomechanics Any BIO or MIC course excluding BIO 105, 312, and 313 (MIC 100 Microbes and Society is a popular choice) SpringIII (17 cr.) CHE 460 Medical Terminology for Health Ed. ESS 320 Field Experience in Exercise Science ESS 323 Nutrition and Sport PHY 104 Fundamental Physics II 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses Fall IV (12 cr.) SpringIV (13 cr.) Arts Gen Ed—2 course ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 368 Strength and Conditioning Techniques and Programs ESS 100 Physical Activities ESS 446 Current Research and Trends in Exercise Science Internat’l Gen Ed #2 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses 6 Credits of Minor/2nd Major Courses nd
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Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
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