References Feldman, K.A. (1976). Grades and college students’ evaluations of their courses and teachers. Research in Higher Education, 4, 69-111. Howard, G.S., Conway, C.G., & Maxwell, S.E. (1985). Construct validity of measures of college teaching effectiveness. Journal of Educational Psychology, 77, 187196. Marsh, H.W. (1982). The use of path analysis to estimate teacher and course effects in student ratings of instructional effectiveness. Applied Psychological Measurement, 6(1), 47-59. Marsh, H.W. (1983). Multidimensional ratings of teaching effectiveness by students from different academic settings and their relation to student/course/instructor characteristics. Journal of Educational Psychology, 75, 150-166. Marsh, H.W. (1984). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: Dimensionality, reliability, validity, potential biases, and utility. Journal of Educational Psychology, 76, 707-754. Marsh, H.W. (1987). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: Research findings, methodological issues, and directions for future research. International Journal of Educational Research, 11(3), 253-388. Marsh, H.W., & Dunkin, M. (1992). Students’ evaluations of university teaching: A multidimensional perspective. In J.C. Smart (ed.), Higher education: Handbook on theory and research, vol. 8, pp. 143-234. New York: Agathon Press. Marsh, H.W., Fleiner, H., & Thomas, C.S. (1975). Validity and usefulness of student evaluations of instructional quality. Journal of Educational Psychology, 67, 833839. Marsh, H.W., & Overall, J.U. (1979b). Validity of students’ evaluations of teaching: A comparison with instructor self evaluations by teaching assistants, undergraduate faculty and graduate faulty. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED177205). Marsh, H.W., & Overall, J.U. (1980). Validity of students’ evaluations of teaching effectiveness: cognitive and affective criteria. Journal of Educational Psychology, 72, 468-475. Overall, J.U., & Marsh, H.W. (1980). Students’ evaluations of instruction: A longitudinal study of their stability. Journal of Educational Psychology, 72, 321-325.
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III. US Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Stude nt Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y University Supervisor STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED Candidate Evaluation Observation Report # (Circle) HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR 1 Copies: WHITE - University Supervisor YELLOW - Cooperating Teacher B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and p edagogy of thecontent area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. 5 6 PINK – Student Teacher Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments 4 Unsatisfactory DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. 3 Performance Level A Developing DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners 2 A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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PLACEMENT HOW? Placement Placement Test Test Transfer Transfer Credits Credits SAT SAT or or ACT ACT Scores Scores High High School School AP AP Scores Scores (Mathematics) (Mathematics) WHAT TO DO? Take Take placement placement test test on on any any campus campus at at Testing Testing Center. Center. Accuplacer Accuplacer MATH MATH can can be be taken taken twice. twice. Students Students who who wish wish higher higher placement placement must must then then “appeal”. “appeal”. Appeal Appeal is is request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they request to take a pencil-and-paper type test on material from the course they placed placed into. into. Bring Bring transcript transcript showing showing general general education education math math credits credits from from another another college college or or university university to to CCBC CCBC for for evaluation. evaluation. If If completed completed in in Maryland, Maryland, the the highest highest level level developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. developmental math course, Intermediate Algebra can be used for placement. Placement Placement by by SAT SAT MATH MATH score score of of 500 500 or or higher higher (or (or by by ACT ACT MATH MATH score score 21 21 or or higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course higher) places the student into an entry-level general education math course (MATH (MATH 111, 111, 125, 125, 131/2/3, 131/2/3, 135, 135, 163). 163). For For higher higher placement, placement, the the student student must must take take Accuplacer MATH. MATH. Accuplacer Students Students with with documentation documentation of of AP AP math math scores scores of of 3, 3, 4, 4, or or 5 5 from from high high school school can can be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart. be awarded college credit and placement according to this chart.
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