Loop structure 2 Use UIBranchContainer and colon tags for looping structures List l = logic.getAllVisibleItems(); for (Item item: l) { UIBranchContainer itemrow = UIBranchContainer.make(listform, "item-row:"); if (logic.canWriteItem(item)) { UIInternalLink.make(itemrow, "item-update", item.getTitle(), new AddItemViewParameters(AddItemProducer.VIEW_ID, item.getId()) ); } else { UIOutput.make(itemrow, "item-title", item.getTitle() ); } UIOutput.make(itemrow, "item-dateCreated", item.getDateCreated() ); }
Non updateable item New item title Oct 29, 2007 10:26 AM
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Example         Push Item 1 Push Item 2 Push Item 3 Pop Push Item 4 Pop Pop Pop Item 1 Item 2 Item 1 Item 3 Item 2 Item 1 Item 2 Item 1 Item 4 Item 2 Item 1 5
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Table of Contents Course topics are hyper-linked to respective slides. If desired click on topics to quick-jump to that section. Note: Must be in Presentation mode to use hyper-link functionality (Press F5 to begin). What is SAP Goods Receiving? Slide 3 Who Should Receive SAP Receiving Training Slide 4 SAP Roles Slide 5 Role Combinations Slide 6 Training Requirements for Departmental Roles SAP General Process Flow Slide 8 Understanding Transaction Codes Slide 9 Goods Receiving Overview Slide 10 How to Identify PO Number Slide 11 Begin Goods Receiving Slide 12 Goods Receipt Major Sections Slide 16 Create Goods Receipt Slide 21 Display Goods Receipt Slide 27 Create Partial Goods Receipt Slide 28 Cancel Goods Receipt Slide 32 Display Purchase Order from Goods Receipt Slide 37 How Determine Assigned Purchasing Buyer Slide 38 Numbering Conventions for Purchase Orders Slide 39 Setting Delivery Complete Indicator Slide 40 Create Goods Receipt Against ”Reverse” PO’s Slide 41 Create Attachment Slide 42 Naming Convention for Attachments Slide 43 Helpful Icons within MIGO Slide 44 Obtaining Hard Copy of Goods Receipt Slide 45 SAP Goods Receiving Changes to PO Quantities Slide 46 Slide 7 2
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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