Project Retrospectives from Norm Kerth (and Edward Bear) … we bump our heads in project after project, day after day. If we would only take a moment to stop and think of alternative ways to proceed, I’m sure we could find better ways to do our work. Norm Kerth
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Project Retrospectives a final thought from Norm Kerth (and Edward Bear) … we bump our heads in project after project, day after day. If we would only take a moment to stop and think of alternative ways to proceed, I’m sure we could find better ways to do our work. Norm Kerth
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Reflect and find a better way Here is Edward Bear, coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head, behind Christopher Robin. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of coming downstairs, but sometimes he feels that there is another way, if only he could stop bumping for a moment and think of it. A. A. Milne Winnie the Pooh
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Retrospectives The Retrospectives Prime Directive: Regardless of what we discover, we understand and truly believe that everyone did the best job they could, given what they knew at the time, their skills and abilities, the resources available, and the situation at hand. (From Norm Kerth’s book on Project Retrospectives See also http://www.retrospectives.com ) Why this rule? The goal of a retrospective is to improve the process, not to assign blame for the problems
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“B.E.A.R” Robot • The B.E.A.R is an acronym for Battlefield Extraction-Assist Robot • Currently a semi-autonomous robot that can rendezvous at GPS locations or specific mapped out targets • Unique form of locomotion that includes tracks and a biped design that work in unison to enable to Bear to traverse all terrain types Current sensors on the bear include: • Tactile sensors on fingers • 360° IR and color situational awareness camera’s • Newly developed Micro-Hydraulics used for precision handling The Bear’s three fingered hands have 6 degrees of freedom [1] The Bear is suppose to have a “friendly” appearance… I will let you be the judge of that! • Currently under proof-of-concept phase of development • Next Phase is BEAR 8.0 due to debut in late 2012 Demo Video [2] [3] [4] References: [1] (2010). Andrew Allen of the Bear Robot Program is Interviewed by Sander Olson(2011). [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://nextbigfuture.com/2010/09/andrew-allen-of-bear-robot-program-is.html [2] (2012). The Bear™ Vecna Robotics LOGO. . (2012). [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://www.vecna.com/robotics/solutions/bear/index.shtml [3] (2012). New Robots Navigate by “Guessing” What’s Ahead before Seeing (2007). [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://news.softpedia.com/newsImage/New-Robots-Navigate-by-Guessing-What-039-s-Ahead-before-Seeing-2.jpg/ [4] (2012). Bear Robot Designed to Save Lives, Looks Like It Will Kiss Us All (2010). [Web Photo]. Retrieved from http://technabob.com/blog/2010/09/05/vecna-bear-robot/ Presented by: Benjamin B. Rhoades Date presented: 7-10-2012 5
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Why retrospectives? Learning and development do not necessarily occur as a result of the experience itself but as a result of reflection explicitly designed to foster learning and development. B. Jacoby For many of the team members, this will be the first time they consciously think about the processes they use. N. Kerth … wisdom comes from our ability to understand the relationship between an individual’s work and that of the entire team. … I have seen whole-team reflection explain, discover, and teach so much. I believe that there is no better way to improve a team’s performance and quality. N. Kerth
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BUMP MAPPING BY PERFORMING ANGULAR PERTURBATIONS TO THE SURFACE OF AN OBJECT, THE APPEARANCE OF LOCAL GEOMETRIC VARIATIONS CAN BE PRODUCED, YIELDING DIMPLES AND WRINKLES WITHOUT ACTUALLY PERFORMING GEOMETRIC CALCULATIONS DURING THE RENDERING PROCESS. A BUMP-MAPPED OBJECT (ABOVE) WITH THE BUMP MAP (BELOW) PART 6.4 2D TEXTURES AND TEXTURE MAPPING A BUMP-MAPPED OBJECT FROM A PROCEDURALLY GENERATED HEIGHT FIELD WARNING: THE SMOOTH SILHOUETTE IS A DEAD GIVEAWAY THAT BUMP MAPPING WAS COMBINING BUMP MAPPING WITH COLOR MAPPING
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BEHAVIOR WHEN AROUND BEARS General Rules of the Trail 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. YOUR TOP PRIORITY IS PREVENTING ENCOUNTERS. Know your bears and bear behavior and arm yourself with wisdom and tools before you go hiking in bear country. Be prepared by bringing bear spray with you and watch for bear signs. Hike as a group. Never surprise a bear. Talk loudly as you travel with each other on the trail, clap hands or sing a song to let the bear know you are there. Always watch for bear signs as you hike or rest. They include bear droppings, tracks, scratched trees, trees or brush knocked down, and odors.
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Probability          With fair coins, tossing a coin will result in equal chance of 50%, or ½, of its ending up heads. Let us call this probability p. Obviously, the probability of tossing a tails, q, is q = (1  p). With 3 coins, the probability of getting any single one of the combinations is 1/2n = 1/8th, (since there are 8 combinations, and each is equally probable). This comes from (½) (½) (½), or the product of each probability p = ½ to get a heads. If we want to know the probability of getting, say 1 heads and 2 tails, we just need to multiply the probability of any combination (1/8th) by the number of ways of getting 1 heads and 2 tails, i.e. 3, for a total probability of 3/8. To be really general, say the coins were not fair, so p ≠ q. Then the probability to get heads, tails, tails would be (p)(q)(q) = p1q2. Finally the probability P(x; n, p) of getting x heads given n coins each of which has probability p, is With 3 coins, there are 8 ways for them to land, as shown above. In general, there are 2n possible ways for n coins to land. How many permutations are there for a given row, above, e.g. how many permutations for getting 1 head and 2 tails? Obviously, 3. x n x x n x How many permutation for x heads and n x tails, for general n and x?  n P ( x; n, p )   p q  x  n! p (1  p ) x !(n  x)! February 12, 2010 .
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Good response (scores: 70-75 points) If this happened to me I would note that the rock is very heavy so it could be gold. I would then try and press something hard into the rock because I know solid gold has a very soft texture. If I could not decide whether or not it was gold I would bring it somewhere that I could find out for sure like a geologist that could help me out. I don’t think I would pay $360 for the rock unless I was absolutely positive. Poor response (scores: 0-30 points) I would probably do some research to find out what kind of rock it is. If it is a very valuable rock, I would pay the $360. Otherwise, I would probably get rid of it. If I didn’t have time to do research I would have it shipped to me by mail. I would definitely wonder what kind of rock it was. I would study the characteristics and look them up in my geology book. I would for sure make smart decisions on how I could keep it in my possession.
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Self-Guided Training DVD Architecture Main DVD Menu with intro “how-to” use DVD Falls Injuries in Residential Construction Video Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2 Fall Hazards during site prep Fall hazards during foundation work Fall hazards during flooring work Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2 Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2 Fall hazards during framing work Fall hazards during roofing work Fall hazards during siding / bricking Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2 Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2 Fall hazards during finishing work Safe alternative 1 Safe alternative 2
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