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What is a Project Retrospective? A retrospective is an opportunity for the participants to learn how to improve. The focus is on learning—not fault-finding. Norm Kerth
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Project Retrospectives A retrospective is an opportunity for the participants to learn how to improve. The focus is on learning—not fault-finding. Norm Kerth
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Project Retrospectives from Norm Kerth (and Edward Bear) … we bump our heads in project after project, day after day. If we would only take a moment to stop and think of alternative ways to proceed, I’m sure we could find better ways to do our work. Norm Kerth
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Project Retrospectives a final thought from Norm Kerth (and Edward Bear) … we bump our heads in project after project, day after day. If we would only take a moment to stop and think of alternative ways to proceed, I’m sure we could find better ways to do our work. Norm Kerth
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Today’s Workshop Log Frame Objectives Success Measures Verification Assumptions Goal Deliver successful projects Within next year: 1. Key project objectives reached on time, within budget, at required performance level. 1. Schedule and financial records 2. Project log frames 1. Participants have projects to work on. Purpose Within 3 weeks after training 80% of participants have completed project designs using the Log Frame model. 1. Follow up surveys 1. Participants have opportunity to apply concepts. 2. Participants will complete and return surveys. Outcomes Participants learn key PM concepts At the end of workshop 90% of participants can identify the four critical questions and develop a log frame. 1. Workshop exercises 2. Participant feedback 1. Participants are motivated to learn. 2. Instructor is competent to teach concepts. Inputs Develop training materials Materials are developed before the workshop. 1. Materials are printed 24 hour prior to the workshop. 1. Instructor will have time to develop materials. 2. The printing machine works. Participants apply what they learned following workshop.
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More matrix/vector operations • • • • length(v) % determine length of vector. size(A) % determine size of matrix. rank(A) % determine rank of matrix. norm(A), norm(A,1), norm(A,inf) % determine 2-norm, 1-norm, and infinity-norm of A. • norm(v) % compute vector 2-norm.
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What is a retrospective? A time to reflect on and improve our practices. We have to test our knowledge constantly—using practices like retrospectives. These should be done after each iterative cycle rather than waiting until the end of the project. The quality of learning derived from this practice shows an organization’s true commitment to learning, and therefore, a key to its adaptability. Jim Highsmith Retrospective rituals are more than a review of the past. They also provide a chance to look forward, to plot the next project, and to plan explicitly what will be approached differently next time. Norm Kerth
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Retrospectives One important idea in Agile Development: take time to reflect and learn  Iteration is good, because you have a natural breakpoint to apply some of what you have learned In Scrum (and many other Agile methodologies), the team runs a Retrospective meeting at the end of each iteration  A Retrospective is like a post-mortem, but it isn’t dead yet  An end-of-iteration retrospective meeting takes an hour or two The end-of-iteration Retrospective meeting is a chance to learn what worked well, what should be changed  don’t use a Retrospective to blame team members or managers for all of the problems – focus on fixing the process
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Execution of Individual Projects • • • Each project is executed by a Project Team. For medium and large projects, Project Manager, Project Scientist and Project Engineer roles will be defined (may be combined into one or two individuals). – Project Manager: The Project Manager is ultimately responsible for the overall success of the project. Manages the project budget and staffing allocations, sets the project schedule. Responsible for arranging project reviews, providing status reports, and so on. Represents the project to the GBT Project Planning Committee. – Project Scientist: Responsible for setting the scientific requirements of the project, and ensuring that they are met. – Project Engineer: Responsible for the technical aspects of the project. Project Scientist and Engineer assist the Project Manager in the execution of the project e.g. preparation for design reviews, and so on. Large projects might also define team leads for work packages
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