ENROLLMENT SERVICES: STATEMENT OF GOALS for 2014-15 Although the data analysis has shown that retention is not necessarily linked to having taken care of registration and business items by the start of the semester, focus must still be paid to having more students take care of these items early so that staff can identify and work with students who need more case-management interventions. Goal 1: 80% of new CAS students who have declared their intent to enroll should be registered by August 1, 2014. This is not a new goal but it has yet to be achieved. Working towards this goal satisfies Middle States Standard 8: Student Admissions and Retention. Strategies: Build on the success of the summer registration program by adding more days and increasing outreach to students about attending a registration day. Review the space and format of the summer registration program to make the experience more convenient and friendly for students who are new to Trinity and provide a real opportunity for a personal connection to resources on campus. Track the first-year retention for students who participated in the summer registration program compared to those who did not. Goal 2: 70% of new CAS students who registered by August 1, 2013 should have a payment arrangement by August 15, 2014 (orientation). Although there is not a direct link with retention, having business matters taken care of earlier will allow students to engage more with Orientation and allow staff to work on case-management interventions from the start of Orientation. Managers must think about retention much earlier than the mid-point of the fall semester to have an impact on attrition. Working towards this goal satisfies Middle States Standard 8: Student Admissions and Retention. Strategies: Assign Enrollment Services staff members a target group of students with a goal of having 70% of their students complete their payment arrangement by August 15. Improve follow up with students who come to summer registration without completing a payment arrangement. Goal 3: Reduce 3-year cohort default rate to 11% for the 2012 cohort. Trinity’s default rate should not track so close to the national rate, which includes many schools that do not provide Trinity’s level of support and academic standards. Students should borrow less and leave Trinity with a better understanding of repayment options and strategies to avoid default. Working towards this goal satisfies Middle States Standard 9: Student Services. Strategies: Send students an annual notice of how much they have borrowed and provide more workshops and learning opportunities about student debt. Use lender reports to contact students who have left Trinity and whose loans are delinquent before they go into default, and track how many students we assist in avoiding default. Identify students who have already borrowed $50,000 or more for special follow up and loan counseling and track their repayment status after leaving Trinity. 81
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