Manage your video display and layout Quick Reference for your video, not to view the video shared by others. Participants who Lync Web App Join a Lync Meeting with computer audio don’t share their video can choose to display a static picture instead. If you don’t have Lync 2013, you can join a scheduled Lync Meeting The area of the screen in which the pictures or videos are displayed is from Lync Web App. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting. called the gallery. Type your name in the text box, ensure the option to install the Lync Lync Web App provides a rich video experience for meetings. If you have a camera connected to your computer, click to share your video with others in the meeting. A camera is required only to share Web App plug-in update is selected, and click Join the meeting. The plug-in is required to use computer audio. After it’s installed, you can also share your video and programs. There are two layout options to display the pictures and videos being shared. Gallery View displays all the participant pictures and videos while Speaker View displays the picture or video of only an active speaker. When a sharing session starts, a third layout option called Presentation View is available, which displays only the shared content. Click to choose To speed up your entry into future meetings, select the Remember the layout you want. me check box. Depending on how the meeting was set up, you’ll You can also expand the size of the meeting either wait in the lobby or be admitted to the meeting. If you’re in the window to view the meeting stage in greater lobby, only a presenter can admit you to the meeting. All presenters detail. Click immediately enter the meeting. After you’re admitted to the meeting, to go to the full window mode. To return to the normal window size, click the icon again. you can use your computer’s speakers and mic, or a headset to participate in the meeting. Join a Lync Meeting with phone audio In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting. Type your name in the text box, ensure the option to install the Lync Web App Plug-in is not selected, and click Join the meeting. After you’re admitted to the meeting, in the Join Meeting Audio dialog box, click Have the meeting call me to enter a phone number where the conference can © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. call you, or click I will dial in to the meeting and call one of the phone numbers listed in the meeting invitation.
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Join a Lync Meeting 1. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting or click Join Online in the meeting reminder. 2. On the Join Meeting Audio window, select one of the options: Lync 2013 Quick Reference Lync ScheduleMeetings a Lync Meeting Use Lync (full audio and video experience) You can use computer audio and video with your computer’s built-in devices, or a headset and camera. You can simply schedule an Lync Meeting by using the Outlook add-in for Lync. 1. Open your Outlook calendar and on the Home tab, click New Lync Meeting. Call me at: Lync calls you at a number you provide. 2. Don’t join audio Select this if you prefer to call in to the meeting audio with a phone. Use the conference numbers and ID in the invitation to dial in. In the meeting request, add recipients, a subject, agenda, and date/time. Do I need a PIN, work number or extension? Not always. Most of the time when you call in to the meeting, you get connected right away. You only need a PIN and extension if: • You’re the leader (Organizer) of the meeting, and calling from a phone that isn’t connected to your account; such as a cell phone. • You’re an attendee, but the meeting is secured and you need to be identified before joining, (referred to as Authenticated caller). When prompted, use your phone dial pad to enter your number and PIN. If you don’t remember your PIN, click Forgot your Dial-in PIN in the meeting request and follow the instructions on the page to reset. © 2013 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. The meeting request contains the meeting link and audio information that the participant can use to join the meeting or conference call. Set meeting options You can customize your meeting options to fit your requirements, meeting type, and the participants. For example, customize access, presenters, video sharing permissions, and so on. In the meeting request, click Meeting Options, then click A new meeting space (I control permissions). • To control meeting access, select an option under These people don’t have to wait in the lobby. • To choose presenters, select an option under Who’s a presenter? • To mute all attendees and prevent them from sharing video, use the options under Do you want to limit participation?
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Join a Lync Meeting 1. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting or click Join Online in the meeting reminder. 2. On the Join Meeting Audio window, select one of the options: Lync 2013 Quick Reference Lync ScheduleMeetings a Lync Meeting Use Lync (full audio and video experience) You can use computer audio and video with your computer’s built-in devices, or a headset and camera. You can simply schedule an Lync Meeting by using the Outlook add-in for Lync. 1. Open your Outlook calendar and on the Home tab, click New Lync Meeting. Call me at: Lync calls you at a number you provide. 2. Don’t join audio Select this if you prefer to call in to the meeting audio with a phone. Use the conference numbers and ID in the invitation to dial in. In the meeting request, add recipients, a subject, agenda, and date/time. Do I need a PIN, work number or extension? Not always. Most of the time when you call in to the meeting, you get connected right away. You only need a PIN and extension if: • You’re the leader (Organizer) of the meeting, and calling from a phone that isn’t connected to your account; such as a cell phone. • You’re an attendee, but the meeting is secured and you need to be identified before joining, (referred to as Authenticated caller). When prompted, use your phone dial pad to enter your number and PIN. If you don’t remember your PIN, click Forgot your Dial-in PIN in the meeting request and follow the instructions on the page to reset. © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. The meeting request contains the meeting link and audio information that the participant can use to join the meeting or conference call. Set meeting options You can customize your meeting options to fit your requirements, meeting type, and the participants. For example, customize access, presenters, video sharing permissions, and so on. In the meeting request, click Meeting Options, then click A new meeting space (I control permissions). • To control meeting access, select an option under These people don’t have to wait in the lobby. • To choose presenters, select an option under Who’s a presenter? • To mute all attendees and prevent them from sharing video, use the options under Do you want to limit participation?
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President’s Dining Room Room C Room B Room A 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM Getting Students to Read: A Roundtable Discussion on the Best Practices of Reading Quizzes Milton Fuentes, Pablo R Casado Nunez Acquiring foundational knowledge is critical to deep learning and course engagement (Lang, 2016). One way students can secure this knowledge is by completing the weekly reading assignments (Hacker, 2010). However, the research suggests that students struggle with reading required assignments (Brown & Tallon, 2015; Maurer & Longfield, 2015; Johnson & Kiviniemi, 2009); a complaint heard often by faculty at MSU. Reading quizzes have been found to assist with this teaching challenge (Lang, 2016; Tropman, 2014; Wang and Selby, 2017). Reading quizzes are pre-class assessments that are “…usually credit-carrying, low-stakes, short tests used not just to assess student comprehension from a preclass preparatory assignment (Gierasch et al., 2015), but mainly to increase the likelihood that students read the assigned material and have some knowledge of the day’s topic” (Wang and Selby, 2017, p. 418). Tropman (2014) surveyed students in her introductory ethics course and an advanced philosophy course and found that students attitudes toward reading quizzes were generally favorable. The students reported that reading quizzes encouraged them to read, contribute toward class discussion, and secure a better grade. Wand and Selby (2017) assert that this strategy can be further enhanced through error analysis, the process of having students consider their incorrect quiz answers and secure the necessary information to ensure a correct understanding of the course material. In this roundtable, faculty will be introduced to the best practices associated with reading quizzes as well consider the advantages and disadvantages of this teaching strategy for their particular teaching approach and discipline. Pedagogical Research: The Role of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) in Studying One’s Own Teaching: Part One Mousumi Bose, Kathy Gainor, Brian Abrams, Reba Wissner Research in pedagogy is essential to maintaining the integrity of educational approaches, improving teaching, and disseminating information on new practices within a field. While ethical issues arise in any research setting, there are unique considerations in the research of educational activities. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) is designed to review research protocols with the purpose of protecting the safety, privacy, and well-being of research participants. In the case of pedagogical research, educational settings, teaching approaches, and potential vulnerability of the learner population are just a few factors that must be carefully examined in the process of IRB approval. These factors can influence protocol development and the level of IRB review a study will receive. Nevertheless, the IRB should not be considered a barrier but rather a rigorous discourse aimed at conducting both ethical and scientifically sound research in pedagogy. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the IRB process in two distinct research studies on the instructors’ own teaching at MSU, and how the IRB review process helped guide these studies towards providing valuable information on learning outcomes. Dealing with Controversial Issues in the Classroom: Healthcare, Abortion, and “You-Fill-in-the-Blank" Hannah Helmy, Marylou Naumoff, Lisa Lieberman How can we encourage students to have productive conversations about topics for which public discourse is often highly politicized, moralistic, and laden with misinformation and “alternative” facts? In this session, we will explore how to engage students in dialogue about topics such as abortion, the right to healthcare, and personal responsibility for health. In particular, we will draw upon our experiences and those of faculty in the room to discuss effective strategies to address misconceptions, acknowledge personal biases (of both faculty and students), and foster fruitful exchanges of information while being inclusive of the diverse viewpoints our students bring to these conversations. We welcome faculty at any level of experience to join us and share their insights. Supporting Underprepared Writers Laura Field, Elizabeth Martin, Jessica Restaino In late Spring 2016, First Year Writing learned that we would be losing our Introduction to Writing course, which is a course that provides some of our underprepared students with an additional semester of college writing instruction. As a program, we found ourselves faced with a population of students who needed additional support with their writing, but who were matriculated into the traditional WRIT105 College Writing classroom. Our project for the ETF program has been to develop a standard syllabus to guide instructors in our program with best practices. In this roundtable, we will discuss our student populations ongoing needs and will share strategies that we developed to begin to support them. Our hope is that attendees will leave with a better understanding of who these students are and some techniques they can implement in their own writing assignments.
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Senate Goals for 2017-2018 Advocate to ensure institutional planning processes and changes are faculty driven Ensure Senate driven implementation of Guided Pathways Advocate remedies to assist math discipline in the face of AB 705 & changes to CSU requirements Advocate a process for greater faculty input and project management continuity in building and campus facilities programming Help students by working to increase services and support and by advocating institutional plans and program changes to meet their needs Advocate for enhancements to programs & services to assist students in light of changes in state policy Explore Adult Education as vehicle to help under-prepared students with skill development required for first year success Work to ensure completion of a Strategic Enrollment Plan, including addressing the needs of the South Gate Education Center Encourage support for students in the face of new federal policies Boost Academic Senate scholarship fundraising efforts Advocate for our homeless and hungry students Boost faculty engagement in collegial activities Complete and publish Guide for Faculty Hiring Policy Hold Senate Retreat & Social in fall & spring Increase faculty involvement at District and State Senate activities as well as accreditation Ensure all faculty have access to the Faculty Center Revise Constitution to add SG & Chairs Council voting members to Senate
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