Skin sensitizer determinations – Animal testing 1A - Assay Criteria Local lymph node assay EC3 value ≤ 2% Guinea pig maximization test ≥ 30% responding at ≤ 0.1% intradermal induction dose or ≥ 60% responding at > 0.1% to ≤ 1% intradermal induction dose Buehler assay ≥ 15% responding at ≤ 0.2% topical induction dose or ≥ 60% responding at > 0.2% to ≤ 20% topical induction dose 1B - Assay Criteria Local lymph node assay EC3 value > 2% Guinea pig maximization test ≥ 30% to < 60% responding at > 0.1% to ≤ 1% intradermal induction dose or ≥ 30% responding at > 1% intradermal induction dose Buehler assay ≥ 15% to < 60% responding at > 0.2% to ≤ 20% topical induction dose or ≥ 15% responding at > 20% topical induction dose 28 │ www.khlaw.com │ KELLER AND HECKMAN LLP Copyright © 2015
View full slide show




More Options for Responding Analytical Responding •Skeleton feedback – Identify reasons & support, assumptions, and the implied audience •Believing – Accept everything & offer additional ideas to help build the case •Doubting – Challenge everything & offer counter arguments that are not addressed •Descriptive outline – Explain what the text says and does Reader-Based Responding: Movies of the Reader’s Mind Criteria-Based Responding: Compare Text to a Rubric From Elbow & Belanoff, Sharing & Responding
View full slide show




 CRIME IN PROGRESS 1. Remain calm. 2. Call 911 3. Notify Public Safety (602.243.8100). 4. From a safe distance, write down or make a mental note of as much information as possible (i.e., suspect description, clothes worn, vehicle description and license plate number).   DISRUPTIVE PERSON Whenever you observe or are the subject of unruly or disruptive acts by an individual:  Outside the classroom: 1. Notify Public Safety (602.243.8100). 2. Wait for responding officer. 3. Describe the incident to the responding officer.  Inside the classroom: 1. The instructor should immediately contact Public Safety (602.243.8100). 2. The instructor should calmly address the situation with the disruptive person to defuse the incident. 3. Wait for responding officer. 4. Describe the incident to the responding officer. 5. Prepare and forward a “STUDENT CONDUCT DISRUPTION/DISCIPLINE REPORT” to the Vice-President of Student Affairs.
View full slide show




More Options for Responding No Responding: Sharing Sometimes it’s enough simply to let the writer read aloud Descriptive Responding •Sayback – Tell the reader what the text says to you •Pointing – Point to, or identify, key words or phrases •What’s Almost Said – Identify what the writing implies •Structure / Voice / Point of View / Level of Abstraction / Attitude toward Reader / Language / Diction / Syntax – Identify these aspects for the writer •Metaphorical Description – Describe the shape or some other feature of the text From Elbow & Belanoff, Sharing & Responding
View full slide show




• nonassociative learning continued Sensitization is a second type of behavior change that is often classified as nonassociative learning. The change in responding in sensitization also occurs over time in reaction to a single stimulus but it differs from habituation in that: 1. the stimulus causes an increase in responding 2. responding increases not only to the stimulus itself, if it reoccurs, but also to all subsequent stimuli, even stimuli that normally evoke little or no responding. Imagine that an individual not particularly fond of scary movies attends one to placate her friends. When she is back home alone she now startles to noises she normally ignores- the creaking in the walls, the whistle of the wind entering through the crack in the window, the shadows in her room . A single stimulus (the scary movie) intensified responses to all stimuli-- this is sensitization. The behavior change in sensitization is not typically long-lasting, eventually dissipating. For this reason I wonder whether it should be classified as a type of nonassociative learning (see definitions of learning). Nevertheless, sensitization is an important process that is critical to all animals. Sudden, unexpected or potentially dangerous stimuli excite the animal into a state of alert. This sensitized state of alert allows the animal to be vigilant and to respond quickly to anything that may appear. 2 of 2 pages
View full slide show




ELEMENTS OF CHANGE GAPS AND IMPLICATIONS Clarifying Purpose Initiating Planning for Commitment Change Creating Building Followership Capability Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment CHANGE Initiating Commitment Planning for Change Creating Building Followership Capability Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment CONFUSION / DISENCHANTMENT Planning for Change Creating Building Followership Capability Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment COMPLACENCY/ LACK OF IMPORTANCE Creating Followership Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment FALSE STARTS/ WASTED RESOURCES Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment FRUSTRATION/ RESISTANCE Reinforcing Change Pursuing Alignment INACTION/ CONFUSION/ SELF DOUBT Pursuing Alignment WASTED EFFORT/ LOSS OF MOMENTUM Clarifying Purpose Clarifying Purpose Initiating Commitment Building Capability Clarifying Purpose Initiating Planning for Commitment Change Building Capability Clarifying Purpose Initiating Planning for Commitment Change Creating Followership Clarifying Purpose Initiating Planning for Commitment Change Creating Building Followership Capability 5 Clarifying Purpose Initiating Planning for Commitment Change Creating Building Followership Capability Reinforcing Change PROLONGED CHAOS/ IMBALANCE
View full slide show




VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL ALIGNMENT Also referred to as Scope and Sequence (See Chapters 5 and 6) • By incorporating both vertical and horizontal alignment, the students will be able to see the natural connections of the subject matter with multiple aspects of their lives. • Vertical alignment may be thought of as connecting lower grades and upper grades, as well as connecting children with adults. • Horizontal alignment may be thought of as connecting classrooms within the same grade, as well as connecting classrooms with other aspects of the school, community, and families. • Example: The Meskwaki Settlement School implemented a school/community activity focused on identity and revitalization of traditional cultural knowledge. All of the students, faculty, and staff created identity cubes…
View full slide show




State Policy Audits  We surveyed policy documents and laws in eight states: four high performing, four low performing  In high performing states, little attention paid to graduation rates from college  In low performing states a great deal of attention was paid to this issue  However, policymakers did not have extensive plans for what to do  Some evidence of influence of performance funding
View full slide show




What is work time? • Reading and responding to work emails, texts, and phone calls while off work is considered time worked. When the time spent exceeds 8 minutes, this time must be reported as at least .25 (one-fourth) hour on the timesheet. • Supervisors should consider using the Delay Delivery feature or saving emails written outside normal office hours to the drafts folder in Outlook and sending them to their nonexempt employees during a regular work day. • Nonexempt employees should avoid reading and responding to work-related emails outside of regular office hours, unless they have their supervisor’s permission. Responding to work-related text messages or phone calls is permitted without supervisory approval due the urgent nature of the contact. Office of Human Resources | 5/11/2016 | 11
View full slide show