Customer Satisfaction  Customers, internal or external, are satisfied when their expectations regarding a service or product have been met or exceeded.  Conformance: How a service or product conforms to performance specifications.  Value: How well the service or product serves its intended purpose at a price customers are willing to pay.  Fitness for use: How well a service or product performs its intended purpose.  Support: Support provided by the company after a service or product has been purchased.  Psychological impressions: atmosphere, image, or aesthetics © 2007 Pearson Education
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Metropolitan State University of Denver 2018-2019 Manufacturing Concentration Junior Year Senior Year 5th Semester (Fall) 6th Semester (Spring) 7th Semester (Fall) 8th Semester (Spring) 16 hours 13 hours 17 hours 14 hours CET 3135 MET 3100 Mechanics of Materials w/ Lab N/C Computer Programming Manufacturing Analysis MET 3300 MET 3110 MET 3185 Thermodynamics Fluid Mechanics Tool Design & Production Tooling MET 3160 MET 3410 Mechanics II: Dynamics Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerance MET 3000 Statistical Process Controls MET 3250 EET 2000 EET 3010 Electric Circuits & Machines Industrial Electronics OR General Studies Process Control Systems AND EET 3730 EET 3740 History Programmable Logic Controllers MET 4080 Computer Aided Manufacturing MET 3330 MET 4110 Robotics for Manufacturing Senior Project II MET 4000 Project Engineering Approved technical elective General Studies MET 4100 Social & Behavioral Science Senior Project I General Studies Arts & Humanities Mechanical Concentration Junior Year Senior Year 5th Semester (Fall) 6th Semester (Spring) 7th Semester (Fall) 8th Semester (Spring) 16 hours 13 hours 17 hours 13 hours CET 3135 Mechanics of Materials w/ Lab MET 3110 Thermodynamics MET 3160 MET 3410 MET 3070 Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerance Machine Design MET 3185 MET 3125 MET 4070 Heat Transfer w/ Lab Computer Aided Design Fluid Mechanics EET 3010 Mechanics II: Dynamics Industrial Electronics OR EET 2000 Process Control Systems AND Electric Circuits & Machines General Studies History EET 3730 EET 3740 MET 3320 Instrumentation Lab MET 4000 MET 4280 Project Engineering Adv. Energy Technology MET 4100 MET 4110 Senior Project I Senior Project II Programmable Logic Controllers General Studies Approved technical elective Approved technical elective Arts & Humanities Metropolitan State University of Denver, Department of Engineering And Engineering Technology MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Campus Box 29, Aerospace and Engineering Sciences Suite 300, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362 Phone: (303) 615-0499, http://www.msudenver.edu/met General Studies Social & Behavioral Science
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7-21 Customer Satisfaction The The degree degree to to which which expectations expectations of of product product attributes, attributes, customer customer service, service, and and price price have have been been met met or or exceeded. exceeded.           Common Common tools tools for for measuring measuring customer customer satisfaction satisfaction Phone Phone Surveys Surveys Questionnaires Questionnaires Focus Focus Groups Groups ## of of Customer Customer Complaints Complaints “Phantom” “Phantom” Shoppers Shoppers
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Understanding the Equity Summary Score Methodology 3 Score sentiment can be viewed on the symbol ‐ specific Analyst Opinions History and Performance pages. 1. Equity Summary Scorecard Summary: A Total Return by Sentiment chart shows how a theoretical portfolio of stocks in each of the five sentiments performed within the selected time period. For example, the bright green bar represents the performance of all the Very Bullish stocks. Provided for comparison is the performance of First Call Consensus Recommendation of Strong Buy, the average of all stocks with an Equity Summary Score, and the S&P 500 Total Return Index. 2. Performance by Sector and Market Cap Fidelity customers have access to more in‐depth analysis of the Equity Summary Score universe and performance. The Total Return by Sector chart provides the historical performance of a theoretical portfolio of Very Bullish stocks in each sector over the time period selected. For comparison, the average performance of all stocks with an Equity Summary Score during the time period by sector is also provided. The Total Return by Market Cap shows the historical performance by market capitalization for stocks with an Equity Summary Score of Very Bullish as compared to typical market benchmarks as well the average for the largest 500 stocks, the next smaller 400 stocks, and the next 600 smaller stocks by market capitalization. The last table is the Equity Summary Score universe distribution for the reporting month by market capitalization and score. Understanding the Equity Summary Score Methodology Provided By 4 Important Information on Monthly Performance Calculations by StarMine  The set of covered stocks and ratings are established as of the second to last trading day of a given month. For a stock to be included in the scorecard calculations, it must have an Equity Summary Score as of the second to the last trading day of the month. The positions are assumed to be entered into on the last trading day of the month, and, if necessary, exited on the last trading day of the next month.  The Scorecard calculations use the closing price as of the last trading day of the month. The Scorecard calculations assume StarMine exits old positions and enters new ones at the same time at closing prices on the last trading day of a given month. The calculations assume 100% investment at all times.  The 1‐Year total return by Market Cap table breakpoints for the largest 500 stocks (large cap), the next 400 (mid cap), and the next 600 (small cap), are also established as of the end of trading on the second to the last trading day of a given month.  The calculation of performance assumes an equal dollar weighted portfolio of stocks ie theoretical investment allocated to each stock is the same  Performance in a given month for a given stock is calculated as [starting price (starting price meaning closing price as of the last day of trading of the prior month) less the ending price, divided by the starting price.] Prices incorporate any necessary adjustments for dividends and corporate actions (e.g. splits or spinoffs).  The performance of a given tier of rated stocks is calculated by adding up the performance of all stocks within that given tier, then dividing by the total number of stocks in a given tier.  The process for the next month begins again by looking at Equity Summary Scores as of the second‐to‐last trading day of the new month, placing stocks into their given tiers, and starting the process all over again.  It is important to note that the “theoretical” portfolio rebalancing process that StarMine performs between the end of one month and the beginning of the next month is, for the purposes of the scorecard, a cost‐free process. This means that no commissions or other transaction costs (e.g. bid/ask spreads) are included in the calculations.  If a customer attempted to track portfolios of stocks similar to those included in the scorecard, their returns would likely differ due to transaction costs as well as different purchase and sale prices received when buying or selling stocks.
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How Price Ceilings Cause Inefficiency • Price ceilings often lead to inefficiency in the form of inefficient allocation to consumers: some people who are willing to pay the highest prices don’t get it, and those only willing to pay less do get it.  If Abe is willing to pay $1,300 for an apartment but does not get it, and Burt is willing to pay only $1,100 and does get it, there is $200 lost surplus, in addition to deadweight loss. • Price ceilings typically lead to inefficiency in the form of wasted resources: potential expend money, effort and time to be able to buy at the low ceiling prices. • If Abe is willing to pay $1,300 for an apartment and Burt is willing to pay only $1,100 and does get it, then Abe is willing to pay up to $200 more than Burt in money, effort and time to be able to buy at the low ceiling prices. BA 210 Lesson I.6 Price and Quantity Controls 9
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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Price Price Cheese Tray Served with assorted crackers 12” tray serves 16 $38.00 103 16” tray serves 24 $50.00 103 Fresh Fruit Tray 12” tray serves 16 66 16” tray serves 24 66 $38.00 $50.00 Vegetable Crudité Tray 12” tray serves 16 44 16” tray serves 24 44 $30.00 $45.00 The Dips Tray Hummus and loaded ranch dip served with house made chips and fresh vegetables 12” tray serves 16 $40.00 146 16” tray serves 24 $55.00 146 Taco Tray Fruit & Cheese Tray 12” tray serves 16 168 16” tray serves 24 168 Cal Cal $38.00 $50.00 Taco seasoned dip served with tortilla chips 12” tray serves 16 $40.00 146 16” tray serves 24 $55.00 146 Calories represent an average plated meal.
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