Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Student: Ao Teng Instructor: Elbio Dagotto 2010.3.16
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Oxides of Carbon • carbon combines with oxygen to form • • • two different compounds, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide carbon monoxide contains 1.33 g of oxygen for every 1.00 g of carbon carbon dioxide contains 2.67 g of oxygen for every 1.00 g of carbon since there are twice as many oxygen atoms per carbon atom in carbon dioxide than in carbon monoxide, the oxygen mass ratio should be 2 mass of oxygen that combines with 1 g of carbon in carbon dioxide 2.67 g  2 mass of oxygen that combines with 1 g of carbon in carbon monoxide 1.33 g Tro, Chemistry: A Molecular Approach 12
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initialEmissionsFile >> stateFirstLetter; while (!initialEmissionsFile.eof()) { initialEmissionsFile >> stateSecondLetter; initialEmissionsFile >> coalEmission; initialEmissionsFile >> petroleumEmission; initialEmissionsFile >> naturalGasEmission; finalEmissionsFile << << << << finalEmissionsFile << finalEmissionsFile << finalEmissionsFile << finalEmissionsFile << << << stateFirstLetter << stateSecondLetter " Fuel Emissions (in Millions of“ << endl " Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide" << endl "---------------------------------" << endl; " Coal: " << coalEmission << endl; " Petroleum: " << petroleumEmission << endl; " Natural Gas: " << naturalGasEmission << endl; " TOTAL: " coalEmission + petroleumEmission + naturalGasEmission endl << endl << endl; initialEmissionsFile >> stateFirstLetter; } initialEmissionsFile.close(); finalEmissionsFile.close(); cout << "New file " << finalEmissionsFileName << " created and loaded." << endl << endl; } // Prime the EOF loop return; // Reprime the EOF loop AK AK Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 1.3 1.3 Petroleum: Petroleum: 23.8 23.8 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 21.9 21.9 TOTAL: TOTAL: 47 47 AL AL Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 80.7 80.7 Petroleum: Petroleum: 38.8 38.8 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 20.7 20.7 TOTAL: TOTAL: 140.2 140.2 AR AR Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 25.6 25.6 Petroleum: Petroleum: 26.2 26.2 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 11.9 11.9 TOTAL: TOTAL: 63.7 63.7 AZ AZ Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 40.3 40.3 Petroleum: Petroleum: 37.8 37.8 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 18.8 18.8 TOTAL: TOTAL: 96.9 96.9 CA CA Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 6.5 6.5 Petroleum: Petroleum: 261.5 261.5 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 130.9 130.9 TOTAL: TOTAL: 398.9 398.9 CO CO Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 36.9 36.9 Petroleum: Petroleum: 32.9 32.9 Natural Natural Gas: Gas: 23.2 23.2 TOTAL: TOTAL: 93 93 CHAPTER 4 - RepetitionStructures CT CT Fuel Fuel Emissions Emissions (in (in Millions Millions of of Metric Metric Tons Tons of of Carbon Carbon Dioxide Dioxide ----------------------------------------------------------------Coal: Coal: 4.2 4.2 Petroleum: Petroleum: 32.7 32.7 Natural Gas: Natural Gas: 8.6 8.6 TOTAL: TOTAL: 45.5 45.5 42
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Level II Placements 1st Rotation 2nd Rotation FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Choice FW Site 1 1 Student 1- 1st 0 Student 2- 1st FW Site 2 1 Student 2- 1st Choice Student 3- 2nd Choice Student 4- 3rd Choice 1 Student A- 1st Student B- 2nd choice Student C- 3rd Choice FW Site 3 1 Student 4- 1st Choice Student 5- 1st Choice Student 6- 1st Choice Student 7-2nd Choice Student 8- 2nd Choice Student 9- 3rd Choice 1 Student 2- 1st Student 3- 1st Student 4- 1st Student 5- 1st Student 6- 1st Student 7- 1st FW Site 4 0 Student 10- 1st 0 Student 11- 1st Choice FW Site 5 1 No Student 1 No Student FW Site 6 1 No Student 1 Student 11- 1st Student 12- 1st Lake Charles MC with free housing
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The First Order Factors  Note that because we use pattern values (sort of like β weights), some may exceed one. All items loading a factor > .5 are shown. The names we assign to them are arbitrary – suggestions welcome:  Rapport  i31 The instructor responded fully to questions from students i49 The ability of the instructor to answer questions was i14 Regarding my progress in this course, the instructor was concerned and actively helpful i9 The instructor came across as a person as well as a teacher i48 I felt free to ask questions and make comments o4 The instructor provided timely feedback i38 The instructors knowledge of the subject appeared o7 Communication with the instructor or other students contributed to my learning i33 Overall, the instructor was i26 The instructor was in control of the class i39 The instructor was aware when students were having difficulty understanding a topic i42 The instructor was enthusiastic about the class i45 The feedback given by the instructor on my course work was i36 The instructor treated students -1.035 -1.012 -0.953 -0.895 -0.875 -0.753 -0.624 -0.500 0.555 0.564 0.735 0.736 0.772 0.886
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Overview: Accreditation AccreditationTimetable Timetable Overview: Fall Fall2009 2009 Spring Spring2010 2010 MSA: MSA: Review Annual Management Management Plans Plans and and Begin Begin Data Data Collection Collection for for Assessments Assessments in in SP2010 SP2010 Summer Summer2010 2010 MSA: MSA: BY BY END END OF OF SP SP 2010 2010 SECOND SECOND ROUND ROUND OF OF MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT REPORTS REPORTS MSA: MSA: PROGRAM REVIEWS ON ON A A NEW NEW SCHEDULE SCHEDULE AND AND UNDERWAY UNDERWAY MSA: MSA: GEN ED ASSESSMENTS ASSESSMENTS UNDERWAY Fall Fall2010 2010 Fall Fall2011 2011 MSA: MSA: SUMMER SUMMER 2010 2010 TO TO DECEMBER 2010 DECEMBER 2010 –– FIRST FIRST DRAFT DRAFT MATERIALS MATERIALS FOR FOR PRR PRR MSA: MSA: Spring Spring 2010 start drafting reports reports on on Program Program Reviews, Reviews, Student Student Outcomes… Outcomes… Middle States Middle States Periodic Review Periodic Review Report Due Report Due June 1, 2011 June 1, 2011 MSA: MSA: DEC DEC 2010 2010 ongoing… ongoing… finalize finalize Program Program Review Review and and Student Student outcomes outcomes drafts…. drafts…. MSA: MSA: BY END OF SP 2010 GEN ED REVIEW REVIEW DONE DONE START START WRITING WRITING CHAPTER CHAPTER MSA: MSA: Faculty Faculty Handbook Revisions and Faculty Assessment Assessment Reformed and Underway Spring Spring2011 2011 MSA: MSA: DEC DEC 2010 TO APRIL 2010 2010 SECOND SECOND DRAFT DRAFT AND FINALIZE FINALIZE PRR PRR MSA: MSA: Summer Summer 2010 2010 draft draft Faculty Faculty portion portion of MSA PRR MSA PRR MSA: MSA: FINANCE FINANCE report underway in annual strategic ratio analysis and updates NCATE: NCATE: PREPARATION PREPARATION OF OF 88 SPA SPA REPORTS REPORTS DUE BY FEBRUARY 1, 2010 DUE BY FEBRUARY NCATE: NCATE: SELF-STUDY SELF-STUDY REPORT REPORT PREP PREP –– BY SEPTEMBER 2010 BY SEPTEMBER 2010 CCNE CCNE NCATE NCATE Visit Visit MAR/April MAR/April 2011 2011
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  Student #1 Student #2 Student #3 Student #4 Student #5 Student #6 Student #7 Student #8 Student #9 Student #10 Student #11 Student #12 Student #13 Student #14 Student #15   Student #16   Student #17   Student #18   Student #19   Student #20   Student #21     Techniq ue   Desig n   Presenta tion   TOTA L POIN TS 87   Creativ ity And Conce pt 87 73 100 87% 93 100 100 93 80 87 93 80 87 87 87 100 73 80 87 93 87 87 87 100 100 100 100 100 87 87 87 100 97%   85%   90%   83%   90%   100%   100 100 100 100 87 87 87 87 100 100 100 100 87 93 100 93 80 87 93 93 100 100 100 100 67 87 87 87 100%   82% 80 87 93 80 85% 87 87 93 80 87% 100 100 100 100 100% 67 93 93 87 85% 87 100 100 93 95% 87 100 100 100 97% 90% 100%   87%   100%   93%   88% The results show an overall above average achievement and consistency within each category of scoring. Based on the data, emphasis will continue in areas of technique and design. The high scores in the presentation area are credited to the formal critiques and informal presentations conducted in each design course. The rubric is shared with the students throughout the semester, making each student aware of the assessment areas and criteria. Every required deliverable is compared against the rubric by the student to determine the scoring possibilities. Students are given immediate feedback by all evaluators at the reception. A discussion by students and faculty also takes place in a classroom critique following the reception.
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4. The profiles of other students with similar performance histories are then used to create statistically reliable projected scores for each student . Student Projection1 Student Projection 2 Student Projection 3 The Pool Student Projection 4 Student Projection 5 Student Projection 6 Student Projection 7 The actual results of other students who have profiles very similar to Student One are used to create a statistical projection of where Student One is likely to be at the end of a given academic year. Student Projection 8 Student Projection 9 Student Projection 10 Student Projection 11 Student Projection 12 Student Projection 13 Student Projection 14 Student Projection 15 Student Projection 16 Student Projection 17 Student Projection 18 Student Projection 19 Student Projection 20
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What does a Priority List look like? Los Angeles Southwest College Priority List Template INSTRUCTOR FULL TIME FACULTY Summer 2005 Hrs Pts Summer 2006 Hts Pts Summer 2007 Hrs Pts Total Points RANK INSTRUCTOR, A INSTRUCTOR, B INSTRUCTOR, C 2.00 0.25 3.00 0.50 2.00 0.25 3.00 0.50 4.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 5.00 1.00 3.00 0.50 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 2.50 1 2 3 ADJUNCT FACULTY INSTRUCTOR, D ON SENIORITY LIST INSTRUCTOR, E INSTRUCTOR, F 2.00 0.25 3.00 0.50 2.00 0.25 3.00 0.50 4.00 1.00 3.00 0.50 3.00 0.50 3.00 0.50 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1 2 3 INSTRUCTOR, G ALL OTHER FACULTY INSTRUCTOR, H INSTRUCTOR, I 2.00 0.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 5.00 1.00 3.00 0.50 5.00 1.00 0.25 2.25 2.50 1 2 3 12
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3. Each student’s profile is added to a pool that contains the profiles of all students, present and past, who have taken the same year-end assessments. Student Profile 1 Student Profile 2 Student Profile 3 Student Profile 4 The Pool Student Profile 5 Student Profile 6 Student Profile 7 Student Profile 8 Student Profile 9 Student Profile 10 Student Profile 11 Student Profile 12 Student Profile 13 Student Profile 14 Student Profile 15 Student Data Includes the profiles of all students from this year and from past years who have taken the same year-end assessments Student Profile 16 Student Profile 17 Student Profile 18 Student Profile 19 Student Profile 20 Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Chemistry is both physical and chemical - physical attractive forces 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Understanding physical structure of substances is very important in understanding physical state, physical behavior & physical changes. Physical state depends on the physical structure of the substance. Whether a substance is either a molecule (a discrete unit) like water, or a nonmolecule (a 3D lattice of ions) like sodium chloride depends upon physical structure. Physical changes are concerned with energy and states of matter. A physical change does not produce a new substance. Changes in physical state—going from solid to liquid, liquid to gas states (melting, boiling, vaporization, sublimation)— are physical changes. Examples of physical changes include bending wire, melting an ice cube, and evaporating a liquid into the gasous state, or dry ice sublimes. Why do substances physically behave the way they do under varying temperature conditions? In this presentation, we will try to gain a firmer grasp as to the physical structure of matter and physical states observed at room temperature (25°C). Since you are mostly likely reading this while sitting comfortably, perhaps your in living room or study, we will consider the temperature around us, room temperature @ 25°C, to be a good reference point in making comparisons between the solid, liquid and gaseous states of substances when we been to evaluate physical structure.
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Works Cited Dai, L. (2006). Carbon Nanotechnology: Recent Developments in Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science and Device Applications. Miamisburg, OH, USA: Elsevier Science. El chaar, L., Lamont, L. A., & Elzein, N. (2010). PV Technology - Industry update. Power and Energy Society General Meeting, (pp. 1-6, 25-29). Fiorito, S. (2008). Carbon Nanotubes: Angels or Demons? Chicago, IL, USA: Pan Stanford Publishing. Greenemeier, L. (May 20,2008). Scientific American. Retrieved October 12,2010.from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=car bonnanotube-danger. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2010, October 10). Funneling solar energy: Antenna made of carbon nanotubes could make photovoltic cells more efficient. Science Daily . MIT researchers discover new way of producing electricity. (2010). Retrieved October 12, 2010  from PhysOrg: http://www.physorg.com/ news187186888.html Vagn, E. H., & Villy, J. M. (2010). Patent No. EP2227633. Denmark.
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