Empirical Evidence • Home environment: • Depends on parent income and education • Educated high income parents: • encourage studying, provide extra help and discourage distracting • • • • activities offer needed medical care: 50% of low income children have vision problems that interfere with their education Offer stable housing: 30% of low income children attend at least 3 different schools by third grade- only 10% for middle class kids Offer safe housing Nurturing preschool environment: Shonkoff and Phillips (2000): early childhood development has a strong impact on the ability to acquire skills which amplifies differences in school achievement
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City Housing Trust Funds Berkeley, California: Housing Trust Fund Cupertino, California: Affordable Housing Fund Los Angeles, California: Housing Trust Fund Menlo Park, California: Below Market Rate Housing Reserve Morgan Hill, California: Senior Housing Trust Fund Palo Alto, California: The Housing Reserve Sacramento, California: Housing Trust Fund San Diego, California: Housing Trust Fund San Francisco, California: Office Affordable Housing Production Program; Hotel Tax Fund; and Bond Housing Program Santa Monica, California: Citywide Housing Trust Fund West Hollywood, California: Affordable Housing Trust Fund Aspen, Colorado: Housing Day Care Fund Boulder, Colorado: Community Housing Assistance Program and Affordable Housing Fund Denver, Colorado: Skyline Housing Fund Longmont, Colorado: Affordable Housing Fund Telluride, Colorado: Housing Trust Fund Tallahassee, Florida: Housing Trust Fund Chicago, Illinois: Low Income Housing Trust Fund Bloomington, Indiana: Housing Trust Fund Fort Wayne, Indiana: Central City Housing Trust Fund Indianapolis, Indiana: Housing Trust Fund Lawrence, Kansas: Housing Trust Fund Boston, Massachusetts: Neighborhood Housing Trust Cambridge, Massachusetts: Housing Trust Fund Ann Arbor, Michigan: Housing Trust Fund St. Paul, Minnesota: STAR Program St. Louis, Missouri: Housing Trust Fund New Jersey: 142 COAH approved developer fee programs Santa Fe, New Mexico: Community Housing Trust Greensboro, North Carolina: VM Nussbaum Housing Partnership Fund Columbus/Franklin County: Affordable Housing Trust Fund Toledo, Ohio: Housing Fund Portland, Oregon: Housing Investment Fund Charleston, South Carolina: Housing Trust Fund Knoxville, Tennessee: Housing Trust Fund Nashville, Tennessee: Nashville Housing Fund, Inc. Austin, Texas: Housing Trust Fund San Antonio, Texas: Housing Trust Salt Lake City, Utah: Housing Trust Fund Burlington, Vermont: Housing Trust Fund Alexandria, Virginia: Housing Trust Fund Manassas, Virginia: Manassas Housing Trust Fund, Inc. Bainbridge Island, Washington: Housing Trust Fund Seattle, Washington: Housing Assistance Funds Washington, D.C.: Housing Production Trust Fund
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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