Imperfections in the Capital Market A child’s education as an investment Return later in the child’s life Not possible to use human capital as collateral to secure loan to finance education Financial institutions offer loans at a premium The higher than social cost of funds discourages spending on
View full slide show




Designing the Loan Class Loan -annualInterestRate: double The annual interest rate of the loan (default: 2.5). -numberOfYears: int The number of years for the loan (default: 1) -loanAmount: double The loan amount (default: 1000). -loanDate: Date The date this loan was created. +Loan() Constructs a default Loan object. +Loan(annualInterestRate: double, numberOfYears: int, loanAmount: double) Constructs a loan with specified interest rate, years, and loan amount. +getAnnualInterestRate(): double Returns the annual interest rate of this loan. +getNumberOfYears(): int Returns the number of the years of this loan. +getLoanAmount(): double Returns the amount of this loan. +getLoanDate(): Date Returns the date of the creation of this loan. +setAnnualInterestRate( Sets a new annual interest rate to this loan. annualInterestRate: double): void Sets a new number of years to this loan. +setNumberOfYears( numberOfYears: int): void +setLoanAmount( loanAmount: double): void Sets a new amount to this loan. +getMonthlyPayment(): double Returns the monthly payment of this loan. +getTotalPayment(): double Returns the total payment of this loan. Loan TestLoanClass Liang, Introduction to Java Programming, Seventh Edition, (c) 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0136012671 Run 12
View full slide show




Entrepreneurship: is it good enough to be social? John F. McVea and Michael J. Naughton Introduction • The term Social Entrepreneurship has experienced a huge growth in influence over that last decade. The literature proposes a number of advantages to social entrepreneurship as a frame of reference: • Promoting innovation within non-profits • Leveraging and focusing scarce philanthropic resources • Faster response to strategic challenges • Infusion of business skills to non-business world • Involvement of non government assets in social problems • Creation of hybrid (blurred) organizations between for profit and non profit worlds. It is widely observed that practice has outpaced theoretical development leading to little agreement on definitions or frameworks for social entrepreneurship. We believe that widespread and unchallenged acceptance of the term Social Entrepreneurship masks some dangers and has contributed to confusion in the field. We believe that if we apply some insights from Catholic Social Teaching to the issue of social entrepreneurship we can move beyond the false dichotomy of Entrepreneurship/ Social Entrepreneurship and identify three specific entrepreneurial strategies which support a more robust discussion of the nature of the work that is entrepreneurship. We believe that the field would benefit from spending less time discussing social entrepreneurship and more time discussion the nature of the good entrepreneur. • • • • • The dangers of naïve acceptance of Social Entrepreneurship • • • The rhetorical risk: • Narrow definition: if S.E. is simply used to rebrand non-profits then much of the value of the new activities, hybrid design, stimulation of new resources and innovation is lost. • Implied dichotomy: if “good” ventures are termed “social” it can imply that other forms of entrepreneurship are “asocial” or “anti social” • Boundarylessness: In contrast, if all business activities are deemed “social”, to some degree or other, then the term loses all meaning focus on the distinctive phenomenon that is S.E. Despite these risks we are more concerned with a risk beyond rhetoric; the risk of undermining the meaning of work, particularly from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching. While this perspective is drawn from the Catholic tradition, accepting the content of CST does not require acceptance of Catholic faith (Guitan, 2009). The three goods of social entrepreneurship • We are concerned by the side-effects of a concentration thesis that suggests that the moral responsibilities of entrepreneurship can be concentrated in a subset of businesses called social enterprises, presumably leaving other enterprise to simply concentrate on serving themselves. • We are concerned by the impact such a concentration thesis could have on the conception of the meaning of work beyond the world of social enterprise. • We are concerned with how such an approach can focus attention solely on the altruistic contributions of entrepreneurial ventures as the sole measure of their contribution to the Common Good • Instead we propose that, rather than trying to determine the difference between entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship, it would be more productive to focus on the questions “What is Good Entrepreneurship? What action and activities define that goodness?” • We further propose that, by apply the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, we can identify three specific strategies through which entrepreneurial ventures may contribute to the Common Good thus suggesting that good entrepreneurship requires a focus on: 1. Good Goods. The primary way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is by bringing into existence new products and services which are inherently good and which enrich lives and minimize any unintended harms. This can include what we call the “entrepreneurship of the mundane”, that is, the manufacture of the nuts and bolts and basic necessities of life as well as the creation of life saving treatments. However, inclusion of good goods as a primary moral contribution of entrepreneurship must also require of the entrepreneur analysis of what goods are not good, and what aspects of even good goods should be redesigned or rethought in order to minimize unintended consequences. We find, in our discussions, that this is a much under appreciated dimension of the good of entrepreneurship. 2. Good Work. The second way an entrepreneurial venture can contribute to the Common Good is through the nature of the work that is carried out by the venture. This dimension has several aspects both internal and external to the entrepreneur: • The development of good character in the entrepreneur. This aspect of the good is derived from the subjective dimension of work, that is, just as how-we-work ends up changing the world, so working-on-the-world changes us. Most professionals spend the majority of their waking hours at work. As habits, character and wisdom are developed through experience and activity, for the entrepreneur, doing good work is an important opportunity to develop character. Society as a whole is better off for having good, successful entrepreneurial leaders who, through that calling, can become leaders of character. This dimension of the entrepreneurial good is widely unappreciated even by entrepreneurs themselves • Good relations with employees, customers and other stakeholders. Value creation and trade creates opportunities for the building of social relationships. The central question is “Are you in good relation with those with whom you create value?’ Do your employees have opportunity to develop as people? 3. Good Wealth. The third way the good entrepreneur can contribute to the Common Good is through the creation of good wealth. Good wealth requires a balance of reward for labor/ creativity with the provision of a living wage to all. Good wealth is often captured by individual action but has social strings attached. From the CST perspective the creation of good wealth implies a particular solidarity with the poor. One way to contribute to the common good is to donate altruistically to those in need. But even here, altruism is only one of a number of possible strategies. Good entrepreneurs may also contribute by donating their time or their particular skills. Indeed, since the donation of time and work often requires physical interaction with those in need, it often generates a solidarity of far greater integrity. Finally, it must be emphasized that altruism, for the entrepreneur, is always dependent, indeed subsequent to the creation of good wealth in the first place. Literature cited Alvord, Sarah, David L. Brown, and Christine W. Letts, 2004. “Social Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study,” The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. 40:260. Benedict XVI, Caritas et veritate,   Boschee, Jerr. 1998 “What does it take to be a social entrepreneur?” National Centre for Social Entrepreneurs (www.socialentrepreneurs.org/whatdoes/html), 5pp.   Cannon, Carl. 2000. “Charity for profit: how the new social entrepreneurs are creating good by sharing wealth” National Journal, June 16: 1898-1904.   Christie, Michael and Benson Honig. 2006. “Social entrepreneurship: New research findings.” Journal of World Business. 41: 1-5.   Dees, Gregory, J., 1998. “The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship,’” Original Draft: 10/3.   Drucker, P.F. 1985. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. New York: Harper & Row.   Fowler, Alan. “NGDOs as a moment in history: beyond aid to social entrepreneurship or civic innovation?” Third World Quarterly, 21(4): 637-654.   Gregg, S. and G. Preece: 1999, Christianity and Entrepreneurship (The Centre for Independent Studies Limited, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia).   Hibbert, Sally A., Gillian Hogg and Theresa Quinn. “Consumer response to social entrepreneurship: The case of the Big Issue in Scotland.” International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 7(3): 288-301.   Johnson, Sherrill, 2000. “Literature Review on Social Entrepreneurship,” Canadian Center for social Entrepreneurship. (http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/ccse/Publications/).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Laborem Exercens (On Human Work): 1981, in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   John Paul II, Pope.: 1992 Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (On Social Concern): 1987 in D. J. O’Brien and T. A. Shannon, (eds.), Catholic Social Thought (Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY).   Kennedy, R., G, Atkinson, and M. Naughton, (eds.): 1994, Dignity of Work: John Paul II Speaks To Managers and Workers (University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland).   Mair, Johanna and Ernesto Noboa, 2003. “Social Entrepreneurship: How Intentions to Create a Social Enterprise get Formed,” IESE Business School.   Mair, Johanna and Ignasi Marti, 2006. “Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight,” Journal of World Business. 41: 36-44.   Melé, D.:2001, ‘A Challenge for Business Enterprises: Introducing the Primacy of the Subjective Meaning of Work in Work Organization’, (http://www.stthomas.edu/cathstudies/cst/mgmt/le/papers/mele.htm) Conclusions We have argued that, while there is great promise in the contemporary social entrepreneurship movement, there are also a number of important dangers. We propose that, if we confront rather than acquiesce to these dangers, we can use the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching to broaden the scope of entrepreneurial ventures that we study, to enrich the moral dimension of entrepreneurial strategy and to deepen the teaching of entrepreneurship as a whole. We recommend the following to move toward these contributions: • Incorporate social entrepreneurship into entrepreneurship in a way that enhances the three goods of entrepreneurship. Specifically we propose replacing the questions “What is social entrepreneurship?” with the questions “What does it mean to be a Good entrepreneur?” From this perspective we can then apply what we have called the three goods of entrepreneurship as a means of supplying critical challenge and inspiration to all forms of entrepreneurship such that the true moral dimension of this critical force in our lives comes into fruition. • Encourage research within the entrepreneurship discipline that addresses traditional social entrepreneurial issues such as micro lending, fair trade products, etc. • Develop bridge courses such as Theo/Cath 306 which help students understand and experience the meaning of the good entrepreneur as well as connect students to the spiritual and moral principles of a good entrepreneur. • Expose entrepreneurship students to so-called social entrepreneurs as well so-called conventional good entrepreneurs so they can see the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities. © File copyright Colin Purrington. You may use for making your poster, of course, but please do not plagiarize, adapt, or put on your own site. Also, do not upload this file, even if modified, to third-party file-sharing sites such as doctoc.com. If you have insatiable need to post a template onto your own site, search the internet for a different template to steal. File downloaded from http://colinpurrington.com/tips/ academic/posterdesign. Acknowledgments I am indebted to Michael Naughton and Laura Dunham for their reflections and thoughts on this paper.
View full slide show




Financial/Capital Market INTEREST RATE refers to: 1)the price that borrowers pay for the use of loanable funds and 2) the rate of return earned by capital as an input of production. Over time, the price of loanable funds and the rate of return on capital goods tend to be equal. For instance, if the rate of return on capital were higher than the price of loanable funds, firms would borrow additional funds in order to buy additional capital, which increase the availability of capital and reduces the rate of return on capital. Due to firms’ borrowing, the demand for loanable funds will increase and the price of loanable funds rises. Therefore, we end up with one interest rate in theory, but in reality, interest rates vary. The factors affecting interest rates are many. The most important factors are Risk, Term of loan, and Cost of making the loan. Bond and Stock A bond is a promise to pay for the use of someone else’s money. Government and corporations both issue bonds to raise funding for their activities. All bonds specify the following: 1. Maturity date (2010), 2. A dollar figure which is called the face value ($1000) and 3. A coupon rate, which is stated in percentage (10%). When a person buys the corporate bonds described above, he pays $1000 and receives annual payments from the corporation ($1000 X 10% = $100). This $100 continues until 2010, which is the maturity date. This person receives the face value of the bond $1000 in 2010. There is an inverse relationship between interest rates and bond prices. The rule to follow in bond market is simple: buy bonds when you think interest rates are as high as they will go (bond price will be low), and sell them when you think interest rates are as low as they will go (because then bond prices will be high). Instead of selling bonds, a corporation may issue stock to raise financial capital. A share of stock is a claim on the assets of the corporation. A shareholder has a share of the ownership of the corporation, whereas the buyer of a corporate bond is lending funds to the corporation. Therefore, the rapid stock price increase in the late twentieth century has created a wealth effect, which caused an increase in the interest rate. Since stockholders’ wealth has increased due to the high stock prices, they became more confidence in their financial status. Their consumption increased. In order to finance the purchases, they would borrow more, which caused the demand for loanable funds to increase and raised the interest rate.
View full slide show




The Savings–Investment Spending Identity  In a simplified economy:  (1) Total Income = Total Spending  (2) Total income = Consumption spending + Savings  Meanwhile, spending: spending consists of either consumption spending or investment  (3) Total spending = Consumption spending + Investment spending  Putting these together, we get:  (4) Consumption spending + Savings = Consumption spending + Investment spending  Subtract  (5) consumption spending from both sides, and we get: Savings = Investment spending
View full slide show




Why does the rate of return on capital investment tend to equal the interest rate for borrowed funds? Suppose that the rate of return on capital investment was greater than the interest rate for borrowed funds. Then investors would benefit by borrowing funds and investing in capital. So the level of investment will increase, and as it does the rate of return declines (due to diminishing marginal returns). Investment will increase until the rate of return on capital investment is equal to the interest rate for borrowed funds. Similarly, if the rate of return on capital investment was less than the interest rate for borrowed funds, investors would be losing money by making capital investments. Investment will be cut back until the rate of return on capital investment again equals the interest rate for borrowed funds.
View full slide show




Rate Terminology 7  Interest rate – “exchange rate” between earlier money and later money (normally the later money is certain).  Discount Rate – rate used to convert future value to present value.  Compounding rate – rate used to convert present value to future value.  Required rate of return – the rate of return that investors demand for providing the firm with funds for investment. This is from the investors’ point of view. The higher the rate of return available, the more investors are willing to supply.  Cost of capital – the rate at which the firm obtains funds for investment; this is from the firm’s point of view. The lower the rate that firms have to pay, the more funds they will demand since more investment projects will meet the hurdle rate of return, i.e. the cost of firms’ funds.  The total amount of funds that will be lent will be equal to the amount at which the investors’ required rate of return will equal the amount that the firms is willing to pay. Hence in equilibrium, the cost of capital will be equal to the investors’ required rate of return.  Opportunity cost of capital – the rate that the firm has to pay investors in order to obtain an additional $ of funds, i.e. this is the marginal cost of capital. This is the rate that investors demand from this firm because if the firm doesn’t pay this this much, they can get that return from other demanders of capital.
View full slide show




24 Functions are not Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods F are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods Methods are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are are not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not not Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions Functions
View full slide show




Qualifying Loans and Repayment: 1 of 2 NIH will repay: • Educational loans backed by the U.S. Government • Educational loans from accredited U.S. academic institutions and commercial lenders NIH will not repay: • Non-education loans (e.g., home equity loans) • Loans consolidated with another individual (e.g., spouse or child) • PLUS loans to parents o EXCEPTION: PLUS loans disbursed to graduate and professional students on or after July 1, 2006, qualify for LRP repayment • Loans that have been converted to a service obligation (e.g., NYSHESC) • Delinquent loans, loans in default, or loans not current in repayment NIH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS 12
View full slide show




Loan Amounts Year Freshman Sophomore Junior /Senior Subsidized and Unsubsidized Aggregate Loan Limit Dependent Students Dependent Students (except students whose parents are unable to obtain PLUS Loans) Independent Students (and dependent undergraduate students whose parents are unable to obtain PLUS Loans) $5,500 $5,500—No more than $3,500 $9,500—No more than $3,500 of this amount may be in of this amount may be in subsidized loans. subsidized loans. $6,500 $6,500—No more than $4,500 $10,500—No more than of this amount may be in $4,500 of this amount may subsidized loans. be in subsidized loans. $7,500 $7,500—No more than $5,500 $12,500—No more than of this amount may be in $5,500 of this amount may subsidized loans. be in subsidized loans. $31,000 $57,500 for undergraduate $31,000—No more than students—No more than $23,000 of this amount may $23,000 of this amount may be in subsidized loans. be in subsidized loans.
View full slide show




SPAC ORGANIZATION CHART Effective 9/8/2015 Lynn Lynn McGinley McGinley AVP, AVP, SPAC SPAC Nathan Nathan Hollaway Hollaway Admin Admin Assistant Assistant Moji Moji Nabavian Nabavian International International Accountant Accountant Kevin Kevin Cooke Cooke International International Accountant Accountant Beryl Beryl Gwan Gwan Manager, Costing Manager, Costing and and Compliance Compliance Laura Laura Scarantino Scarantino Director Director Tong Tong Li Li Cost Analyst Cost Analyst Vacant Vacant Cost Cost Analyst Analyst Amy Amy LaFevers LaFevers Assistant Assistant Director Director Krista Krista Salsberg Salsberg Red Red Manager Manager Kevin Kevin Smith Smith Yellow Yellow Manager Manager Kathleen Kathleen Wiess Wiess Manager Manager Fritz Fritz Alphonse Alphonse Team Team White White Manager Manager Michelle Michelle Moore Moore Financial Financial Accountant Accountant Shernett Shernett Wynter Wynter Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Daniel Daniel Grote Grote Financial Financial Accountant Accountant Victoire Victoire Bikoi Bikoi Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Tina Tina Zhu Zhu Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Wendy Wendy Yu Yu Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Ron Ron Hill Hill Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Christian Christian Onwudiegwu Onwudiegwu Financial Accountant Financial Accountant Vacant Vacant Financial Accountant Accountant Financial Mary Mary Miller Miller Collections, Collections, Accountant Accountant Karen Karen Little Little Accounting Accounting Analyst Analyst Brenda Brenda Hester Hester Accountant Accountant Cheryl Cheryl Williams-Smith Williams-Smith Financial/Closeout Financial/Closeout Accountant Accountant Yitzchok Yitzchok Bloch Bloch Financial Accountant Financial Accountant
View full slide show




Other Loan options PLUS Loan (Parent Loan for Undergraduate Student). This is a loan that parent’s may take out, but must pass approval process based on Parent’s credit rating SELF Loan (Student Education Loan Fund). This is a student loan that requires a co-signer and a credit check of both the student and co-signer Alternative or Private Loans. These are loans offered by certain lenders to supplement other forms of funding. Schools must have a contract with the lender for the school to offer a lender’s Alternative/Private loan. FDLTCC offers the Sallie Mae Signature Loan and the Wells Fargo Collegiate Loan
View full slide show




IEEE Std 1076.3 Packages Numeric_Bit  Comparison operators - various combinations of signed and unsigned arguments FUNCTION FUNCTION “>” “>” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION “<” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION “<” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “<=” “<=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION “>=” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION “>=” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “=” “=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “/=” “/=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean;  Shift and rotate functions FUNCTION FUNCTION shift_left shift_left (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION shift_right (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN FUNCTION shift_right (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION rotate_left (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION rotate_left (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION rotate_right rotate_right (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION sll sll (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION slr (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION slr (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION rol rol (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION ror (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION ror (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; 24/03/19 UAH-CPE528 8
View full slide show




IEEE Std 1076.3 Packages Numeric_Bit  Comparison operators - various combinations of signed and unsigned arguments FUNCTION FUNCTION “>” “>” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION “<” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION “<” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “<=” “<=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION “>=” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION “>=” (l,r:unsigned) RETURN boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “=” “=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean; FUNCTION FUNCTION “/=” “/=” (l,r:unsigned) (l,r:unsigned) RETURN RETURN boolean; boolean;  Shift and rotate functions FUNCTION FUNCTION shift_left shift_left (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION shift_right (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN FUNCTION shift_right (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION rotate_left (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION rotate_left (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION rotate_right rotate_right (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION sll sll (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION slr (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION slr (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION FUNCTION rol rol (arg:unsigned; (arg:unsigned; count:natural) count:natural) RETURN RETURN unsigned; unsigned; FUNCTION ror (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; FUNCTION ror (arg:unsigned; count:natural) RETURN unsigned; 24/03/19 UAH-CPE528 24
View full slide show




Financial Aid Annual Process Beginning October 1 of each year: Student completes new year’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) www.fafsa.ed.gov TTUHSC receives FAFSA data from the Federal processor electronically. March: TTUHSC begins sending missing information emails to the student if additional documents are needed. Student returns those necessary documents to complete the financial aid file. May: TTUHSC emails award notice to the student. The award offer outlines the programs and funding the student is eligible to receive for the school year. Student completes the Federal Direct Loan Application process for the year. (only for students borrowing Federal Direct Loans). Student completes Grad Plus/Alternative loan application (only for students borrowing one of these loans) 10 days prior to the start of each semester: Student Business Services (SBS) Tuition Due date—ONLY for students not receiving Financial Aid 10 days prior to the start of each semester: • Federal Direct Loan and alternative loan processing service electronically sends loan funds to the school • Financial aid funds (loans, grants, & scholarships) are posted towards student’s tuition accounts The week before the start of each semester: • HSC SBS Office sends any refunds to student based on student’s refund preference. st
View full slide show




Regional National Bank (RNB), Off-balance Sheet Conversion Worksheet $ Amount Contingencies 100% conversion factor Direct Credit substitutes Acquisition of participations in BA, direct credit substitutes Assets sold w/ recourse Futures & forward contracts Interest rate swaps Other 100% collateral category Total 100% collateral category Contingencies 50% conversion factor Transaction-related contingencies Unused commitments > 1 year Revolving underwriting facilities (RUFs) Other 50% collateral category Total 50% collateral category Contingencies 20% conversion factor Short-term trade-related contingencies Other 20% collateral category Total 20% collateral category Contingencies 0% conversion factor Loan commitments < 1 year Other 0% collateral category Total 0% collateral category Total off-balance sheet commitment *BA refers to bankers acceptance. Credit Conversion Factor Credit Equivalent $ Amount 165,905 100.00% 165,905 0 100.00% 0 0 50,000 75,000 0 290,905 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 0 50,000 75,000 0 290,905 0 364,920 0 0 364,920 50.00% 50.00% 50.00% 50.00% 0 182,460 0 0 182,460 0 0 0 20.00% 20.00% 0 0 0 0 0 0 655,825 0.00% 100.00% 0 0 0 473,365
View full slide show