THE PRESIDENT? CONTINUED  If you feel strongly about sharing your personal opinions on a subject, you must give the chair to the vice president and you cannot resume as president until the issue has been decided  When absent from a meeting, let the club leader and Vice President know in advance so they can arrange to fulfill your duties
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • LIST OF THE CLUB SPORTS Bison Dance Team Club Baseball Club Tennis Team Cricket Club Cycling Club Hockey Club (Men’s and Women’s) Horseman’s Club (Equine Club) Intercollegiate Bowling Team Lacrosse Club (Men’s and Women’s) Marksmanship Club NDSU Fencing Club NDSU Men’s Nordic Skiing Club Water Polo Club (temp) • • • • • • • • • • • • NDSU Swim Club NDSU Women’s Nordic Skiing Club Paintball Club Racquetball Club Rock Climbing Club Rodeo Club Rugby Club (Men’s and Women’s) Soccer Club Softball Club Ultimate Frisbee Volleyball Club (Men’s and Women’s Freestyle Ski and Snowboard Club
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• • • • • • • • • LIST OF THE CLUB SPORTS Bison Dance Team Club Baseball Club Tennis Team Cricket Club Cycling Club Hockey Club (Men’s and Women’s) Horseman’s Club (Equine Club) Intercollegiate Bowling Team Lacrosse Club (Men’s and Women’s) • Marksmanship Club • NDSU Fencing Club • NDSU Men’s Nordic Skiing Club • • • • • • • • • • • • NDSU Swim Club NDSU Women’s Nordic Skiing Club Paintball Club Racquetball Club Rock Climbing Club Rodeo Club Rugby Club (Men’s and Women’s) Soccer Club Softball Club Ultimate Frisbee Volleyball Club (Men’s and Women’s Freestyle Ski and Snowboard Club
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Join a Lync Meeting 1. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting or click Join Online in the meeting reminder. 2. On the Join Meeting Audio window, select one of the options: Lync 2013 Quick Reference Lync ScheduleMeetings a Lync Meeting Use Lync (full audio and video experience) You can use computer audio and video with your computer’s built-in devices, or a headset and camera. You can simply schedule an Lync Meeting by using the Outlook add-in for Lync. 1. Open your Outlook calendar and on the Home tab, click New Lync Meeting. Call me at: Lync calls you at a number you provide. 2. Don’t join audio Select this if you prefer to call in to the meeting audio with a phone. Use the conference numbers and ID in the invitation to dial in. In the meeting request, add recipients, a subject, agenda, and date/time. Do I need a PIN, work number or extension? Not always. Most of the time when you call in to the meeting, you get connected right away. You only need a PIN and extension if: • You’re the leader (Organizer) of the meeting, and calling from a phone that isn’t connected to your account; such as a cell phone. • You’re an attendee, but the meeting is secured and you need to be identified before joining, (referred to as Authenticated caller). When prompted, use your phone dial pad to enter your number and PIN. If you don’t remember your PIN, click Forgot your Dial-in PIN in the meeting request and follow the instructions on the page to reset. © 2013 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. The meeting request contains the meeting link and audio information that the participant can use to join the meeting or conference call. Set meeting options You can customize your meeting options to fit your requirements, meeting type, and the participants. For example, customize access, presenters, video sharing permissions, and so on. In the meeting request, click Meeting Options, then click A new meeting space (I control permissions). • To control meeting access, select an option under These people don’t have to wait in the lobby. • To choose presenters, select an option under Who’s a presenter? • To mute all attendees and prevent them from sharing video, use the options under Do you want to limit participation?
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Join a Lync Meeting 1. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting or click Join Online in the meeting reminder. 2. On the Join Meeting Audio window, select one of the options: Lync 2013 Quick Reference Lync ScheduleMeetings a Lync Meeting Use Lync (full audio and video experience) You can use computer audio and video with your computer’s built-in devices, or a headset and camera. You can simply schedule an Lync Meeting by using the Outlook add-in for Lync. 1. Open your Outlook calendar and on the Home tab, click New Lync Meeting. Call me at: Lync calls you at a number you provide. 2. Don’t join audio Select this if you prefer to call in to the meeting audio with a phone. Use the conference numbers and ID in the invitation to dial in. In the meeting request, add recipients, a subject, agenda, and date/time. Do I need a PIN, work number or extension? Not always. Most of the time when you call in to the meeting, you get connected right away. You only need a PIN and extension if: • You’re the leader (Organizer) of the meeting, and calling from a phone that isn’t connected to your account; such as a cell phone. • You’re an attendee, but the meeting is secured and you need to be identified before joining, (referred to as Authenticated caller). When prompted, use your phone dial pad to enter your number and PIN. If you don’t remember your PIN, click Forgot your Dial-in PIN in the meeting request and follow the instructions on the page to reset. © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. The meeting request contains the meeting link and audio information that the participant can use to join the meeting or conference call. Set meeting options You can customize your meeting options to fit your requirements, meeting type, and the participants. For example, customize access, presenters, video sharing permissions, and so on. In the meeting request, click Meeting Options, then click A new meeting space (I control permissions). • To control meeting access, select an option under These people don’t have to wait in the lobby. • To choose presenters, select an option under Who’s a presenter? • To mute all attendees and prevent them from sharing video, use the options under Do you want to limit participation?
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Manage your video display and layout Quick Reference for your video, not to view the video shared by others. Participants who Lync Web App Join a Lync Meeting with computer audio don’t share their video can choose to display a static picture instead. If you don’t have Lync 2013, you can join a scheduled Lync Meeting The area of the screen in which the pictures or videos are displayed is from Lync Web App. In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting. called the gallery. Type your name in the text box, ensure the option to install the Lync Lync Web App provides a rich video experience for meetings. If you have a camera connected to your computer, click to share your video with others in the meeting. A camera is required only to share Web App plug-in update is selected, and click Join the meeting. The plug-in is required to use computer audio. After it’s installed, you can also share your video and programs. There are two layout options to display the pictures and videos being shared. Gallery View displays all the participant pictures and videos while Speaker View displays the picture or video of only an active speaker. When a sharing session starts, a third layout option called Presentation View is available, which displays only the shared content. Click to choose To speed up your entry into future meetings, select the Remember the layout you want. me check box. Depending on how the meeting was set up, you’ll You can also expand the size of the meeting either wait in the lobby or be admitted to the meeting. If you’re in the window to view the meeting stage in greater lobby, only a presenter can admit you to the meeting. All presenters detail. Click immediately enter the meeting. After you’re admitted to the meeting, to go to the full window mode. To return to the normal window size, click the icon again. you can use your computer’s speakers and mic, or a headset to participate in the meeting. Join a Lync Meeting with phone audio In the meeting request, click Join Lync Meeting. Type your name in the text box, ensure the option to install the Lync Web App Plug-in is not selected, and click Join the meeting. After you’re admitted to the meeting, in the Join Meeting Audio dialog box, click Have the meeting call me to enter a phone number where the conference can © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. call you, or click I will dial in to the meeting and call one of the phone numbers listed in the meeting invitation.
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ADVISOR’S ROLE Club Advisors are there to assist your club in an advisory role as opposed to a directive capacity. Student Clubs should be student lead (however, some advisors are more involved then others). Below is a list of the club advisor responsibilities; however, it is the club officers job to complete the paperwork and items listed, the Advisor is to ensure it is all turned in properly and on time. Club Advisor Responsibilities  A faculty/staff member or community leader approved by the Director of Student Activities.  Attend any advisor training and procedure review sessions.  Serve as a positive role model to the students and take an active role in helping students plan and administer meaningful programming that is consistent with the club’s purpose.  Attend all club activities, meetings, events, and trips in their entirety (unless excused by the Director of Student Activities).  Be well informed about all club activities and keep Student Activities Office informed. (Documentation of a minimum of three (3) meetings per semester and one community service project per year is required).  Ensure that all necessary club documentation is current and on file in the Student Activities Office.  Provide a list of student officers and club members to the Student Activities Office within one month from the start of each semester.  Submit an Activity & Fundraising Planning Form for approval prior to proceeding with any event planning or fundraising activity.  Provide training to club officers on the process of balancing and monitoring the club account, fundraising and spending, and how to create meeting agendas and minutes and ensure minutes are submitted to the Student Activities Office within one week of each meeting.  Ensure College & Club policies and procedures are followed in conducting all club activities as outlined in the Club Advisor Manual.  Inform the Director of Student Activities as soon as possible, if a club disbands or becomes inactive.  Before May 1 of each year, submit a written summary report of the activities accomplished by student club members.
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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