THE PRESIDENT? CONTINUED  Stand and use the podium and or gavel with confidence but do not abuse such “power”  Avoid the use of “I” as a president – use phrases like, “the chair” or “your president”
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Outline Explain the scope of the problem of elder abuse and neglect – Distinguish the different types of elder abuse and neglect – Identify the prevalence of elder abuse and neglect and difficulties in establishing it – Identify the impact of elder abuse on both the patient and society Identify common signs and symptoms of elder abuse and neglect – Recognize the risk factors for elder abuse and neglect – Identify what to look for in the patient – Identify what to look for in the caregiver Define the role of the medical professional in elder abuse and neglect situations – Recognize barriers to proper detection and reporting of abuse and neglect by the medical professional. – Review proper reporting procedures for elder abuse and neglect. – Review proper documentation and findings in suspected elder abuse and neglect situations.
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The Multiplier in Reverse           Machinery workers stand. Car sales people stand. Auto workers stand. Steel workers stand. Construction workers stand. Furniture sellers stand. Furniture workers stand. Clothing sellers stand. Restaurant workers stand. Grocery workers stand.
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Required Conduct A Covered Person shall: • Take all reasonable measures to prevent physical and sexual abuse of a child, including immediately removing a child from potential physical abuse, sexual abuse or prohibited conduct as defined herein. • Report immediately any suspected physical abuse or sexual abuse of a child to the University Police Department (716-673-3333) and provide to the University Police Department a written report of suspected physical or sexual abuse of a child. Mandated reporters under New York Social Services Law are required to report suspected child abuse or maltreatment when they are presented with a reasonable cause to suspect such abuse or maltreatment has occurred. • Comply with the Mandatory Reporting and Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse policy available at www.fredonia.edu/humanresources/policies.asp. • Complete all required training developed pursuant to this Policy. • Wear and display prominently at all times during the Covered Activity photo identification affixed to a lanyard.
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9 E JT Solution Continued 3. Sample information Given: n = 100 and x = 72.6 4. The confidence interval a. Confidence coefficient: z  z(0.005) 2 .58 b. Maximum error: c. The lower and upper limits: E  z (  / n )  ( 2.58)(10.5 / 100 )  2.709 72.6  2.709 69.891 to 72.6  2.709 75.309 5. Confidence interval With 99% confidence we say, “The mean test score is between 69.9 and 75.3”, or “69.9 to 75.3 is a 99% confidence interval for the true mean test score” Note: The confidence is in the process. 99% confidence means: if we conduct the experiment over and over, and construct lots of confidence intervals, then 99% of the confidence intervals will contain the true mean value . 20
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Standard VII: Governance, Leadership, and Administration Suggested Evidence • USM and UMB governance policies • Bylaws: Faculty & Staff Senate; Student Government Association • Mission Statement and Strategic Plans • UMB statement, policy and copy of President’s Annual Evaluation • USM policy for recommending and approving new academic programs and certifications; Policy for implementing at UMB • Policy on Conflict of Interest and Financial Disclosure Policies for faculty and Staff • Minutes or agenda of Board of Regents’ meetings • President, Deans and VPs’ CVs and Job Descriptions • Organization Chart • Policy on reviewing senior institutional leaders at UMB • General policy on Performance Review of UMB faculty and staff • President’s News, transcript of Annual President’s State of the University, other communiques • VP and Executive Committee Agendas and minutes (where focus is on assessment data); • Presidential initiatives • Organization chart and roles and responsibilities of leadership team • Agendas of Faculty and Staff senate meetings; student government reports • President’s policy on evaluating senior staff members; • Transcript of President’s State of the University address • Strategic Plan implementation annual report
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Section A: The Definitions of Child Abuse and Child Molestation This section defines what constitutes child abuse and child molestation. The section also identifies the different types of abuse as well as the effects of child abuse. Did You Know? • • A report of child abuse is made every ten seconds.1 In 2010, more than 90% of the child maltreatment reports in Texas were reports of sexual abuse or neglect.6 • • More than 90% of juvenile sexual abuse victims are abused by people they know.6 About 30% of abused and neglected children will later abuse their own children, continuing the horrible cycle of abuse.1 3
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Get Involved! Student Organizations • • • • • • • • • • • • Association for Computing Machinery President: Quintin Donnelly | Email Quintin: [email protected] American Medical Student Association President: Brooks Becton | Email Brooks: [email protected] Forensic Science Society President: Ashley Aucoin | Email Ashley: [email protected] Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers President: Keith Conley | Email Keith: [email protected] Instructional Technology Student Association President: Robin Jackson | Email Robin: [email protected] Polymer Science Association President: Kristin Van de Voorde | Email Kristen: [email protected] Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) President: Haley Dozier| Email Haley: [email protected] Society of Physics Students President: Andrew Giovengo | Email Andrew: [email protected] Southern Geological Society President: Daniel Winkler |Email Daniel: [email protected] Student Constructors President: Caleb Kergosien| Email Caleb: [email protected] The American Chemical Society - Student Affiliates Chapter USM President: David Sliman | Email David: [email protected] Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) President: Cassandra Reese | Email Cassandra: [email protected]
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Sources Barry, K.L., Blow, F.C. & Schonfeld, L. (2004). Health promotion workbook for older adults (adapted to include medication misuse). Blazer, D.G. & Wu, L.T. (2009). The epidemiology of at-risk and binge drinking among middle-aged and elderly community adults: National survey on drug use and health. American Journal of Psychiatry, 166, 1162-1169. Blow, F.C. (2007). Substance abuse screening and interventions for older adults: Evidence-Based Approaches. Presented at American Society on Aging, San Francisco, CA: June 21, 2007. Blow, F.C. & Barry, K.L. (2011). Substance use disorders among older adults. Presented at SAMHSA/Substance Abuse Prevention Older Americans Technical Assistance Center Training, Chicago, IL. Get Connected! Toolkit: Linking Older Adults With Medication, Alcohol, and Mental Health Resources: http://www.samhsa.gov/Aging/docs/GetConnectedToolkit.pdf Hazlett, RW. & Schonfeld, L. (2011). The use and abuse of alcohol, drugs and prescription medication in vulnerable adults. 2011 Florida Conference on Aging. Miller, W. R., & Rollnick, S. (2002). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people to change addictive behavior (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press. Older Americans Substance Abuse and Mental Health Technical Assistance Center: http://www.samhsa.gov/OlderAdultsTAC/index.aspx Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (1998). Substance Abuse Among Older Adults: A Guide for Social Service Providers. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 26. Department of Health and Human Services Publication No. (SMA) 98-3179. Rockville, MD Simoni-Wastila, L., & Yang, H. K. (2006) Psychoactive drug abuse in older adults. American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacothery, 4: 380–394. Wolstenholme, B. (2011). Medication-related problems in geriatric pharmacology. Aging Well, 4(3), 8. . 27
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5.-continued (b) What must we assume in order for the confidence in part (a) to be appropriate? We assume that either the ages are normally distributed, at least approximately, or the sample size 20 is sufficiently large so that the sampling distribution of y is approximately normal. (c) How would the confidence interval in part (a) have been different if a 90% confidence level were chosen? The 90% confidence interval would have shorter length than the 95% confidence interval in part (a). (d) How would the confidence interval in part (a) have been different if a 99% confidence level were chosen? The 99% confidence interval would have longer length than the 95% confidence interval in part (a).
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Incomplete Grade Policy  To receive an “I” grade, a student must:  Wait until the “W” deadline has passed  Be passing the course (cannot award an “I” for poor or failing performance)  Have a legitimate extenuating circumstance (e.g., illness)  Not be required to “re-take” the course as a condition of the incomplete     The instructor must complete an Incomplete Grade Form before issuing an “I” grade Instructors must designate a deadline to complete the work, not to exceed one year Can’t award an “I” grade after the course is complete An “I” grade will not “save” a student from a suspension or dismissal…
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Factors Affecting The Three main factors affect the confidence interval: Confidence Interval 1.The Confidence Level (i.e., how confident do you need to be?) A 90% confidence interval is significantly narrower than a 95% confidence interval, which narrows down the range of estimated values, but increases the chances of making (i.e., an error. 2.The variability how much does the data fluctuate?) Estimated via the sample’s standard deviation, the higher the variability is, the wider the confidence interval will be. 3.The sample size (i.e., how much data can you accumulate?) CS 321 Lesson Ten Confidence Page 3 The confidence interval size and the sample size have an inverse square root relationship (e.g., to cut the confidence in interval in half, you’d need to quadruple
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Oregon APS Annual Report 2010, DHS •In 2010, the Department of Human Services Adult Protective Services received more than 27,000 reports of potential abuse. •2,608 Oregon seniors and adults with physical disabilities were victims of abuse or self-neglect in 2010. •Fewer than 2% of residents in licensed care facilities were found to have been victims of abuse in 2010. Neglect was the most common type of abuse experienced by seniors in Oregon facilities in 2010. Financial exploitation was the most common abuse found in community settings. •85% of founded abuse happened to seniors and adults with physical disabilities in their own homes, 15 percent of founded abuse happened in licensed care settings. •In facilities, a direct caregiver was the most common perpetrator. In the community, family members or close friends were the most common perpetrators of adult abuse in 2010.
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Elder Abuse Three major situations for abuse of the elderly 1. Domestic abuse 2. Institutional abuse 3. Self-neglect Seven types of elder abuse 1. Physical elder abuse 2. Sexual elder abuse 3. Emotional elder abuse 4. Financial exploitation 5. Neglect 6. Self-neglect 7. Abandonment
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The Most Important Policies Every Student Must Know! The “I” - Incomplete Grade Policy Talk with your Instructor. Explain the situation and ask if an “I” grade might be appropriate.An “Incomplete” (“I”) is a temporary grade assigned when illness, unavoidable absence, or other reasons satisfactory to the instructor prevent completion of the course requirements by the end of the semester. A grade of “I” must be satisfactorily removed, as designated by the instructor, no later than the last class day of the semester following the issuance of the incomplete, or the “I” will be changed to an “F” or fail grade. Important - students cannot re-register for the course to satisfy an "I" grade. back | home | next
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Restructuring Other names:  Retrenchments: “I’ve been retrenched”  Downsizing: “I’ve been downsized”  Rightsizing: “I’ve been rightsized”  Reductions-in-force (RIF): “I’ve been riffed”  Layoffs: “I’ve been laid off” Goals:  Cut labor costs  Make the organization more nimble  Make top management closer to customers Methods:  Eliminate specific positions to reduce headcount  Eliminate entire levels of middle management to flatten the organization 3
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Reporting Suspected or Reported Abuse (continued) In summary, there are numerous signs commonly associated with child abuse and neglect. Ensure that you are knowledgeable of these signs, and that you pay close attention to the behavior of the children, parents, caregivers, and others with whom you interact. These patterns may be evidence of abuse or neglect and could save a child’s life. If you witness, suspect, or receive a report of child abuse regardless of when abuse occurred:  Remove the child from immediate harm (if presently occurring)  Report the abuse to local law enforcement  Report the situation to your supervisor or the program director (unless they were the source of abuse or neglect) 26
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Budget Time Line Date set by each vice president or president Budget Managers will submit proposed budgets to divisional vice president or president Budget Office will submit revenue projections and salary and benefit projections to the Vice President for Financial & Administrative Affairs March 2, 2007 March 16, 2007 VPs will submit proposed budgets to VP for FAA Last date revisions for estimated budget will be accepted in the Accounting Office ** March 16, 2007 Budget Review Meetings March 19 – March 23, 2007 Evaluation of Budget Review Meetings by F&AA staff, recommendations by the vice president for F&AA to president, and president’s approved requests March 26 – March 30, 2007 ** Accounting Office will input budget data and prepare budget draft Final review of proposed budget by the vice presidents and president Proposed budget submitted to the TBR April 2 – April 6, 2007 ** April 9 - April 17, 2007 April 18, 2007 4
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How confidence intervals behave The � confidence interval for the mean of a Normal population illustrates several important properties that are shared by all confidence intervals in common use: the user chooses the confidence level and the margin of error follows; we would like high confidence and a small margin of error; high confidence suggests our method almost always gives correct answers; and a small margin of error suggests we have pinned down the parameter precisely. How do we get a small margin of error? The margin of error for the z confidence interval is: The margin of error gets smaller when:  gets smaller (the same as a lower confidence level �) � is smaller. It is easier to pin down µ when is smaller. � gets larger. Since is under the square root sign, we must take four times as many observations to cut the margin of error in half.
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