Implementation  Since end of Sp11 o ~ 100 one-on-one meetings o Most common reasons for poor performance  Not putting forth the effort/time  Fraternities  Working too many hours  Not the right major  Full enforcement effective 2011-’12  Communication plan o Freshman SOAR o ENGR/ETGR 1201 o Advising o Emails and bulletin board  MATH 1103/1241 “Early Warning” pilot  Mid-term grade alerts  End-of-semester progression warning and violation letters (mailed to permanent address)
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bond 1.00% 0.99% 0.95% 0.89% 0.81% 0.71% 0.59% 0.45% 0.31% 0.16% 0.00% s&p500 0.00% 0.16% 0.31% 0.45% 0.59% 0.71% 0.81% 0.89% 0.95% 0.99% 1.00% 100.080 100.750 100.000 100.280 100.692 100.025 100.091 100.081 100.081 109.817 109.100 109.240 100.110 100.617 100.000 100.264 100.582 100.004 100.069 100.058 100.057 108.012 108.530 108.577 100.141 100.452 100.000 100.217 100.495 100.000 100.066 100.038 100.040 106.049 107.784 107.718 100.157 100.276 100.000 100.137 100.467 100.021 100.093 100.021 100.040 104.041 106.995 106.790 100.146 100.143 100.000 100.051 100.607 100.087 100.162 100.027 100.082 102.318 106.548 106.179 100.131 100.151 100.000 100.079 101.156 100.242 100.288 100.120 100.210 101.614 107.355 106.789 100.170 100.359 100.000 100.370 102.251 100.462 100.425 100.338 100.415 103.003 110.991 110.180 100.263 100.665 100.000 100.559 103.114 100.517 100.396 100.477 100.496 106.862 119.270 118.149 100.400 100.834 100.088 100.000 102.362 100.471 100.434 100.517 100.467 111.456 135.055 133.594 101.346 101.361 101.198 100.000 101.509 101.255 101.536 101.334 101.324 114.216 170.918 170.345 100.402 100.427 100.310 100.000 100.405 100.132 100.288 100.150 100.296 107.440 142.314 125.169 BEKK DIAGONAL - VT BEKK SCALAR BEKK SCALAR - VT DCC-ASY-GEN DCC-ASYMMETRIC DCC-GENERALIZED DCC-IMA DCC-MR DCC-RANK FIXED (all sample) OGARCH 1 OGARCH 2 Average 100.159 100.403 100.000 100.033 101.093 100.147 100.204 100.142 100.174 106.648 120.267 118.258 Table 157: sample variance of minimum variance portfolios subject to a required return of 1 (sample: 1001-end) 39
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Work Activities Custom A B C COTS A B 1. Software Project Management and Quality Planning FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE 2. Software Risk Management FULL 3. Software Configuration Mgmt FULL 4. Procurement & Vendor Mgmt FULL 5. Software Requirements Identification and Management FULL 6. Software Design & Implementation FULL 7. Software Safety Design FULL 8. Verification & Validation FULL FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL FULL GRADE FULL FULL FULL FULL NA FULL FULL GRADE GRADE GRADE FULL C GRADE GRADE FULL FULL GRADE FULL FULL FULL NA FULL NA GRADE GRADE GRADE 12
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bond 1.00% 0.99% 0.95% 0.89% 0.81% 0.71% 0.59% 0.45% 0.31% 0.16% 0.00% s&p500 0.00% 0.16% 0.31% 0.45% 0.59% 0.71% 0.81% 0.89% 0.95% 0.99% 1.00% 100.511 100.931 100.000 100.253 100.625 100.402 100.458 112.560 104.676 120.472 111.264 100.462 101.745 100.557 101.014 100.000 100.176 100.481 100.330 100.364 112.188 104.607 117.156 109.198 100.442 101.654 100.592 101.162 100.000 100.112 100.330 100.260 100.276 111.464 104.427 113.237 106.905 100.480 101.546 100.561 101.393 100.000 100.062 100.170 100.168 100.190 110.313 104.131 108.851 104.490 100.536 101.422 100.392 101.578 100.000 100.017 100.005 100.045 100.093 108.717 103.743 104.476 102.268 100.524 101.277 100.328 101.471 100.012 100.079 100.000 100.073 100.105 106.990 103.500 101.517 101.107 100.512 101.239 100.636 101.218 100.000 100.390 100.411 100.524 100.441 105.665 103.734 102.748 102.429 100.644 101.479 100.674 100.912 100.000 100.859 101.066 101.155 101.006 104.578 104.064 110.842 106.870 100.639 101.836 100.076 100.534 100.000 101.284 101.439 101.407 101.385 104.130 103.176 121.875 112.237 100.183 102.002 100.601 100.815 101.616 101.368 101.574 101.333 101.520 110.939 101.852 123.302 114.554 100.000 101.743 100.498 101.415 101.151 100.000 100.297 100.245 100.081 114.037 107.580 109.876 107.572 100.197 102.290 EXP-SM MA(20) MA(100) DCC-IMA (recursive) DCC-MR (recursive) DCC-ASY (recursive) DCC-RANK (recursive) OGARCH1 (recursive) OGARCH2 (recursive) FIXED (sample 1-1000) FIXED (daily update) DCC-ASY-GEN (recursive) DCC-GEN (recursive) Average 100.238 100.874 100.000 100.165 100.328 100.287 100.285 108.954 103.868 111.942 106.909 100.165 101.400 Table 158: sample variance of minimum variance portfolios subject to a required return of 1 (sample: 1001-end) 42
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Field-At-A-Glance (Handout)    2015 – 2016 Generalist MSW Clinical MSW Learning Competencies 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Clinical practice with individuals 2. Clinical practice with families 3. Clinical practice with groups Expectations   Entry-level practice Entry-level practice  Community-based clinical practice Type of Internship Spring Semester Only  Concurrent with course work Concurrent with course work Total Internship Hours 420 Total Field Hours 400 Total Field Hours 600 Total Field Hours Hours/Semesters in Field  (Full Time Students) 28 hours/week during Spring  semester  Average 14 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (200 hours each  semester) Start 2nd week of Class. Average 20 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (300 hours each  semester)   Hours/Semesters in Field  (Part Time Students) 17 hours/week Spring semester (250 hours)   14 hours/week Summer semester  (170 hours)  Average 10 hours/week Fall and  Spring (150 hours each semester)  Average 8 hours/week Summer  semester (100 hours)     Average 13 hours/week Fall and  Spring (200 hours each semester)  Average 16 hours/week Summer  semester (200 hours)  Supervision Required 1 hour/week with BSW or MSW 1 hour/week with MSW 1 hour/week with MSW FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters Field Seminar    FT – 3 hours/week during Spring  semester FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters PT – 2 hours/week Spring semester  and 1 hour/week Summer semester PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Paperwork turned in to: January 2016 BSW   University of Central Florida - Office of Field Education 5
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Field-At-A-Glance (Handout)    2015 – 2016 Generalist MSW Clinical MSW Learning Competencies 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Assessing needs and resources 2. Providing resources 3. Obtaining resources (case  management) 4. Developing/Improving resources 1. Clinical practice with individuals 2. Clinical practice with families 3. Clinical practice with groups Expectations   Entry-level practice Entry-level practice  Community-based clinical practice Type of Internship Spring Semester Only  Concurrent with course work Concurrent with course work Total Internship Hours 420 Total Field Hours 400 Total Field Hours 600 Total Field Hours Hours/Semesters in Field  (Full Time Students) 28 hours/week during Spring  semester  Average 14 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (200 hours each  semester) Start 2nd week of Class. Average 20 hours/week Fall and  Spring semester (300 hours each  semester)   Hours/Semesters in Field  (Part Time Students) 17 hours/week Spring semester (250 hours)   14 hours/week Summer semester  (170 hours)  Average 10 hours/week Fall and  Spring (150 hours each semester)  Average 8 hours/week Summer  semester (100 hours)     Average 13 hours/week Fall and  Spring (200 hours each semester)  Average 16 hours/week Summer  semester (200 hours)  Supervision Required 1 hour/week with BSW or MSW 1 hour/week with MSW 1 hour/week with MSW FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters Field Seminar    FT – 3 hours/week during Spring  semester FT – 1.5 hours every other week during  Fall and Spring semesters PT – 2 hours/week Spring semester  and 1 hour/week Summer semester PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters PT – 1 hour every other week during  Fall, Spring and Summer semesters Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Seminar Instructor Field Paperwork turned in to: August 2015 - 16 BSW   University of Central Florida - Office of Field Education 31
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Theories and Articles in Academic The following topics are available to you in PDF format upon request to CPS Advising academic advisor: • Advising as Teaching and the Advisor as Teacher in Theory and • In Practice * • Ethical Issues in Advising The Faculty Advisor: Institutional and External Information and • Learning-Centered Advising • Developmental Academic Advising • Legal Issues in Academic Advising • Appreciative Advising • Informational Component: Learning About Advisees • Strengths-Based Advising • One-to-One Advising; Group Advising; Advising Online • Academic Advising Informed by Self-authorship Theory • Proactive Advising • Advising as Coaching • The Applicati0n of Constructivism and Systems Theory to Academic Advising • Socratic Advising • Understanding and Interpretation: A hermeneutic Approach to Knowledge
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AER Strategy Grid: Micro-Analysis of Customer Heterogeneity and Dynamics  Output of MP#2 is a microanalysis of customer heterogeneity and dynamics in the firm’s customer portfolio  The insights from MP#2 then can be inserted into the AER strategy grid to reveal highimpact strategies  Each box in this grid describes the most effective strategy for a unique persona at a single point in time AER Strategy Grid Acquisition Acquisition Strategy Strategy Expansion Expansion Strategy Strategy Retention Retention Strategy Strategy Persona Persona #1 #1 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Persona Persona #2 #2 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Persona Persona #3 #3 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 © Palmatier 39
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The City University of New York 2016-2017 Year-End Financial Report Expenditures Comparison: Percent of Total Expenditure by College FY2016 Expenditures Adjunct/ PS Regular Temp Service Summer FY2017 Expenditures Total PS OTPS Total Exp PS Regular Adjunct / Summe r Temp Service Total PS Total Proj. Exp OTPS Baruch College Brooklyn College City College Hunter College John Jay College Lehman College Medgar Evers College NYC College of Technology Queens College College of Staten Island York College Graduate Center CUNY School of Law School of Journalism School of Professional Studies School of Public Health 79.5% 78.6% 81.0% 76.5% 73.0% 79.5% 79.4% 69.5% 7.6% 6.1% 3.9% 9.4% 8.7% 7.3% 7.8% 15.0% 2.6% 4.9% 3.1% 4.1% 3.7% 2.4% 3.6% 2.1% 89.7% 89.6% 88.0% 90.1% 85.5% 89.2% 90.8% 86.7% 10.3% 10.4% 12.0% 9.9% 14.5% 10.8% 9.2% 13.3% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 81.2% 79.5% 81.4% 76.9% 74.5% 79.8% 78.0% 72.2% 8.0% 6.8% 5.1% 10.2% 9.6% 8.6% 9.5% 17.2% 2.5% 5.0% 3.3% 4.6% 3.9% 2.7% 4.6% 2.1% 91.7% 91.3% 89.8% 91.7% 87.9% 91.1% 92.1% 91.5% 8.3% 8.7% 10.2% 8.3% 12.1% 8.9% 7.9% 8.5% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 77.9% 76.1% 77.2% 58.2% 70.0% 57.3% 62.4% 7.7% 8.2% 9.4% 0.5% 1.4% 7.2% 12.4% 3.6% 5.0% 2.6% 10.5% 4.2% 5.2% 4.7% 89.2% 89.3% 89.2% 69.2% 75.6% 69.7% 79.5% 10.8% 10.7% 10.8% 30.8% 24.4% 30.3% 20.5% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 79.3% 78.2% 78.9% 58.3% 72.8% 74.5% 62.3% 8.3% 10.0% 9.9% 0.6% 2.3% 9.4% 14.7% 4.0% 4.1% 2.7% 12.7% 5.4% 7.8% 5.5% 91.6% 92.3% 91.4% 71.6% 80.5% 91.7% 82.5% 8.4% 7.7% 8.6% 28.4% 19.5% 8.3% 17.5% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% - - - - - - 79.3% 0.5% 6.0% 85.9% 14.1% 100.0% Senior College Total 75.2% 7.3% 4.2% 86.6% 13.4% 100.0% 76.5% 8.3% 4.5% 89.3% 10.7% 100.0% BMCC Bronx CC Guttman CC Hostos CC Kingsborough CC LaGuardia CC Queensborough CC 63.6% 77.2% 62.7% 72.3% 71.7% 69.4% 74.5% 11.6% 7.8% 2.4% 7.4% 10.1% 10.2% 10.2% 3.0% 4.1% 4.0% 3.3% 6.9% 4.6% 3.2% 78.2% 89.1% 69.1% 83.0% 88.7% 84.2% 87.9% 21.8% 10.9% 30.9% 17.0% 11.3% 15.8% 12.1% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 65.9% 78.6% 64.0% 74.7% 73.2% 72.6% 76.2% 11.6% 8.0% 2.7% 7.4% 9.7% 10.3% 9.7% 3.0% 4.2% 4.4% 3.4% 6.8% 4.7% 3.0% 80.5% 90.9% 71.2% 85.5% 89.8% 87.6% 88.9% 19.5% 9.1% 28.8% 14.5% 10.2% 12.4% 11.1% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Community College Total 70.3% 9.7% 4.2% 84.1% 15.9% 100.0% 72.4% 9.6% 4.1% 86.1% 13.9% 100.0% 9 University Total 73.7% 8.0% 4.2% 85.9% 14.1% 100.0% 75.3% 8.7% 4.4% 88.4% 11.6% 100.0%
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Alerts : Does not prevent employee from submitting time Alert Who ? When? Fix The hours worked and /or time off you have entered exceeds 8 hours in a day. If this is incorrect, please click on the block of time to edit it. Nonexempt employees •Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees. Employee exceeds the scheduled hours in a day. The warning is letting employee know that by exceeding the scheduled hours they could end up with overtime hour. Only a warning/alert- no fix is needed if employee worked over the scheduled time. You have entered time on a holiday. If this is incorrect, please click on the block of time to delete it. If this is correct, you can proceed with submitting your time sheet when all hours have been entered Time entry & in/out nonexempt employees Regular hours are being reported on a day with holiday hours Only a warning/alert- no fix is needed if employee worked on that holiday. International students may only work 20 hours per week while school is in session. You may work more than 20 hours per week during the summer semester, spring break, and winter break. International students Work hours reported exceeds 20hrs during the regular semester Employees must be compensated for any time worked. Contact Norma Lozano in HR (ext. 2198) if you have any questions regarding any possible visa issues. ***Violating these rules can jeopardize your visa status. *** Unmatched time clock event exists: You have a time clock event (Check In) that does not have a matching (Check Out) time clock event. Only applies to in and out time reporters Employee forgot to check out In the Time worklet you can click on Time Clock History to see all Unmatched Clock Events. Clicking on Add Clock Event will allow you to add a Check Out for the appropriate date and time.
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2018-2019 See Prerequisites for all classes Preparatory Courses Prep Math High School Metropolitan State University of Denver MTH 1110 MTH 1120 College Algebra College Trig Recommended course rotation: Freshman Year Sophomore Year 1st Semester (Fall) 2nd Semester (Spring) 3rd Semester (Fall) 4th Semester (Spring) 16 hours 16 hours 16 hours 16 hours ENG 1010 Composing Arguments ENG 1020 Freshman Composition EET 2340 Technical Programming Applications EET 2350 Adv. Technical Programming SPE 1010 EET 1140 EET 1150 Public Speaking Circuits I Circuits II COM 2610 Intro to Technical Writing General Studies Social & Behavioral Science I CHE 1100 Principles of Chemistry PHY 2311 General Studies General Physics I Arts & Humanities Electronics: An Introduction CHE 1150 Principles of Chemistry Lab MTH 1400* Precalculus EET 1001 PHY 2321 EET 2310 General Physics I-Lab Digital Circuits I MTH 1410 MTH 2410 EET 2145 Calculus I Calculus II Electronics • Students placing directly in to MTH 1410 in the first semester may replace these credits with MTH 2420 in the third semester. EET 2165 Electronics Lab Communications Concentration Junior Year Senior Year 5th Semester (Fall) 6th Semester (Spring) 7th Semester (Fall) 8th Semester (Spring) 16 hours 17 hours 17 hours 14 hours General Studies History EET 3410 Electric Machines EET 3120 Advanced Analog Electronics EET 3730 Process Control Systems EET 3110 EET 3740 Transform Methods in Circuit Analysis Programmable Logic Controllers EET 3620 Analog & Digital Communications EET 3715 Control Systems Analysis EET 3670 Measurements for Communication Systems EET 4100 EET 4110 Senior Project I Senior Project II EET 4340 Approved technical elective Interface Techniques EET 3630 EET 4320 Electromagnetic Fields Digital Filters Approved technical elective EET 4620 Adv. Communications Systems General Studies Social & Behavioral Science II EET 3330 EET 4370 Digital Circuits II Microcontrollers EET 4020 Digital Circuits III PHI 1030 Intro to Ethics OR PHI 3360 Business Ethics Metropolitan State University of Denver, Department of Engineering And Engineering Technology ELECTICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Campus Box 29, Aerospace and Engineering Sciences Suite 300, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217-3362 Phone: (303) 615-0499, http://www.msudenver.edu/eet
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21 New Questions Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have enough food Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have health care Everyone, regardless of circumstances, should have a place to live Most people who are poor waste a lot of their time The poor are treated the same as everyone else The poor have the same opportunity for success as everyone else The poor face challenges that are the same as everyone else Governments should do more to help the poor Charities should do more to help the poor Businesses should do more to help the poor  Individuals should do more to help the poor  Lack of transportation is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of social support (family, friends, church) is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of education is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of child care is a major challenge for the poor  Lack of self-control is a major challenge for the poor  It upsets me to know that many people are poor  I feel that I know what it is like to be poor  I feel that I understand why someone may be poor  I feel that I have enough direct experience with the poor  I feel that I could personally make 
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Connections Between AER Strategy and BOR Equity Grids AER Strategy Grid Acquisition Acquisition Strategy Strategy Expansion Expansion Strategy Strategy Retention Retention Strategy Strategy Persona Persona #1 #1 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 1 1 Persona Persona #2 #2 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 2 2 Persona Persona #3 #3 Most Most effective effective acquisition acquisition strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 Most Most effective effective expansion expansion strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 Most Most effective effective retention retention strategies strategies for for Persona Persona 3 3 Personas account for customer heterogeneity AER stages account for customer dynamics BOR Equity Grid Marketing Marketing Objectives Objectives Relative Relative Advantages Advantages Sources Sources of of Sustainability Sustainability Brand Brand Strategy Strategy (Chapter (Chapter 5) 5) Brand Brand marketing marketing objectives objectives Relative Relative advantages advantages of of the the firm’s firm’s brand brand vs. vs. competitors’ competitors’ brands brands Brand’s Brand’s sources sources of of sustainability sustainability Offering Offering Strategy Strategy (Chapter (Chapter 6) 6) Offering Offering and and innovation innovation objectives objectives Relative Relative advantages advantages of of the the firm’s firm’s offering offering vs. vs. competitors’ competitors’ offerings offerings Offering’s Offering’s sources sources of of sustainability sustainability Relationship Relationship marketing marketing objectives objectives Relative Relative advantages advantages of of the the firm’s firm’s relationships relationships vs. vs. competitors’ competitors’ relationships relationships Relationship Relationship marketing’s marketing’s sources sources of of sustainability sustainability Environmental Trends Technology Technology trends trends Regulatory Regulatory trends trends Relationship Relationship Strategy Strategy (Chapter (Chapter 7) 7) Socioeconomic Socioeconomic trends trends © Palmatier 38
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Letter and Number Formation Pts . Highly Proficient A 1 Consistency--height 15 All letters and numbers are the same height Some letters and numbers are uneven Most letters and numbers are uneven 2 Consistency--spacing 15 All letter and numbers spaced correctly Some letters and numbers are too close or too far Most letters and numbers are unevenly spaced 3 Consistency-formation 25 All letters are formed properly; all letters vertical or inclined Some letters are not properly formed Most letters are incorrectly formed 4 Straight lines 10 Drawn with single, smooth stroke Some drawn in more than single stroke Obviously drawn with multiple strokes 5 Curves 10 Can be drawn in segments; no wiggles; smooth stroke Highly Proficient A Overall Appearance Competent B Partially Competent/ Developing C Limited D Major Improvement Required E Obvious breaks in connections Competent B Partially Competent/ Developing C Limited D Major Improvement Required E 6 Neatness 25 Paper is neat without smudges Some smudging Messy with smudges 7 Line Thickness 25 Consistent line thickness Some variance in thickness but mostly good quality Inconsistent thickness; strokes too heavy or too thin 8 Legible 25 Letters are readable and distinguishable from each other Most letters are legible Few letters are legible
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Campaign Design Worksheet SAMPLE Define a Target Student Population My target student population and rationale for why they require this additional attention: Parameters I will use to create an SSC work list: Mid-career Management majors with borderline GPAs but high risk predictions. They need help to succeed and have time to make significant changes but might fly under the radar.  College/School: Business  Major: Management  Credits Earned: 30 - 60  Cumulative GPA: 2.00 - 2.70 Objectives: This targeted advising campaign will… 1. Contact all identified students at least three times to encourage them to initiate an advising session 2. Schedule an individual advising session with at least 75 percent of  Risk: High Risk  Term Enrollment: Currently Enrolled identified students 3. Connect 50 percent of students with the tutoring center to work on their academic standing Total number of students identified: 45 4. Reduce these students’ risk of stopping out Plan Your Outreach Strategy Action Steps These Students Need to Take:  Seek out academic support services, such as tutoring and study habit workshops  Select and register for courses that match their strengths and in which they have a higher likelihood of success My Communication Plan: Method Email Phone Advising Session My Follow Up Steps: Timing/Frequency Communication Objective and Resources Two times, one week apart during the first half of the semester First: notification of risk status, encourage to make appointment; second: more urgent encouragement, suggest tutoring center before midterms Once in the week after email #2 Discuss resources, why students are at-risk, try to schedule an in-person appointment Once as early in the semester as possible Walk students through notifications, discuss why they are at-risk, maybe even discuss major choice, discuss study habits and time management, plan coursework for next semester  Check with tutoring center to see which students have made appointments  Analyze student risk information one and two semesters after campaign Evaluate Your Campaign Success Metrics and Target Outcomes: Metric Target Percent of population contacted 100% Number of students that complete in-person advising sessions 34 Number of students that make appointments with the tutoring center 23 Number of students that improve their risk level by the end of the following semester 25 ©2014 The Advisory Board Company • eab.com 3 Actual Outcome
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