New New Design Design Options Options (cont’d) (cont’d) T-form T-formConcepts: Concepts: Eliminate Eliminatevertical vertical (hierarchical) (hierarchical)and and horizontal horizontal(departmental) (departmental) internal internalboundaries. boundaries. Breakdown Breakdownexternal external barriers barriersto tocustomers customersand and suppliers. suppliers.
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June 2010 WV GIS Conference Key Statutory Requirements of Voter Precinct Delineation – – §3-1-5. Voting precincts and places established; number of voters in precincts; precinct map; municipal map. (a) The precinct shall be the basic territorial election unit. The county commission shall divide each magisterial district of the county into election precincts, shall number the precincts, shall determine and establish the boundaries thereof, and shall designate one voting place in each precinct, which place shall be established as nearly as possible at the point most convenient for the voters of the precinct. Each magisterial district shall contain at least one voting precinct and each precinct shall have but one voting place therein. – Each precinct within any urban center shall contain not less than three hundred nor more than one thousand five hundred registered voters. Each precinct in a rural or less thickly settled area shall contain not less than two hundred nor more than seven hundred registered voters, unless upon a written finding by the county commission that establishment of or retention of a precinct of less than two hundred voters would prevent undue hardship to the voters, the secretary of state determines that such precinct be exempt from the two hundred voter minimum limit. If, at any time the number of registered voters exceeds the maximum number specified, the county commission shall rearrange the precincts within the political division so that the new precincts each contain a number of registered voters within the designated limits. If a county commission fails to rearrange the precincts as required, any qualified voter of the county may apply for a writ of mandamus to compel the performance of this duty: Provided, That when in the discretion of the county commission, there is only one place convenient to vote within the precinct and when there are more than seven hundred registered voters within the existing precinct, the county commission may designate two or more precincts with the same geographic boundaries and which have voting places located within the same building. The county commission shall designate alphabetically the voters who will be eligible to vote in each precinct so created. Each such precinct shall be operated separately and independently with separate voting booths, ballot boxes, election commissioners and clerks, and whenever possible, in separate rooms. No two of such precincts may use the same counting board. – (b) In order to facilitate the conduct of local and special elections and the use of election registration records therein, precinct boundaries shall be established to coincide with the boundaries of any municipality of the county and with the wards or other geographical districts of the municipality except in instances where found by the county commission to be wholly impracticable so to do. Governing bodies of all municipalities shall provide accurate and current maps of their boundaries to the clerk of any county commission of a county in which any portion of the municipality is located. – (c) To facilitate the federal and state redistricting process, precinct boundaries must be comprised of intersecting geographic physical features or municipal boundaries recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau. For purposes of this subsection, geographic physical features include streets, roads, streams, creeks, rivers, railroad tracks and mountain ridge lines. The county commission of every county must modify precinct boundaries to follow geographic physical features or municipal boundaries and submit changes to the West Virginia office of legislative services by June 30, 2007 and by the thirtieth day of June, every ten calendar years thereafter. The county commission must also submit precinct boundary details to the U.S. Census Bureau upon request. – The West Virginia office of legislative services shall be available for consultation with the county commission regarding the precinct modification process: Provided, That nothing in this subsection removes or limits the ultimate responsibility of the county commission to modify precinct boundaries to follow geographic physical features. – (d) The provisions of this section are subject to the provisions of section twenty-eight, article four of this chapter relating to the number of voters in precincts in which voting machines are used. – (e) The county commission shall keep available at all times during business hours in the courthouse at a place convenient for public inspection a map or maps of the county and municipalities with the current boundaries of all precincts. Source: §3-1-5 WV Code
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The New Stack – Process Is the Next Platform Client Punch Card or Terminal Custom (10’s of users) Application Data Management Applicatio n OS and Databas e Mainframe 4 Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Request Form Any Device (Millions of users) PC or Internet (1000’s of users) Composites Applicatio n Applicatio n Applicatio n OS OS OS DB OS Client Server OS OSApplicatio ns OS OS DB OS DB OS DB OS OS SOA Magal and Word ! Essentials of Business Processes and Information Systems | © 2009 Composites OS OSApplicatio ns OS OS DB OS DB OS DB OS OS
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21-43 Departmental Departmental Contribution Contribution to to Overhead Overhead Departmental Departmental revenue revenue –– Direct Direct expenses expenses == Departmental Departmental contribution contribution Departmental contribution . . . • Is used to evaluate departmental performance. • Is not a function of arbitrary allocations of indirect expenses. A department may be eliminated when its departmental contribution is negative. McGraw-Hill/Irwin © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2005
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Matching Matching Key Key External External and and Internal Internal Factors Factors to to Formulate Formulate Alternative Alternative Strategies Strategies (Table (Table 6-2) 6-2) Key Internal Factor Excess working capacity (an internal strength) Insufficient capacity (an internal weakness) Strong R & D expertise (an internal strength) Poor employee morale (an internal weakness) Resultant Strategy Key External Factor + 20% annual growth in the cablevision industry (an external opportunity) + Exit of two major foreign competitors from the industry (an external opportunity + Decreasing numbers of young adults (an external threat) + Strong union activity (an external threat) = = = = Acquire Visioncable Buy competitors’ facilities Develop new products for older adults Develop a new employee-benefits package
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Dimension Below Expectations 1 Meets Expectations 2 Above Expectations 3 Collect and organize critical data and information to solve a problem. Response does not use relevant concepts to address question; response does not demonstrate a clear understanding of the relevant concepts; response discusses irrelevant concepts. Limited use of quantitative and qualitative case data to support position.   Response uses relevant concepts to address question; response demonstrates an understanding of the relevant concepts; however, the response is not succinct and directly informed by the concept. Some extraneous concepts summarized and discussed. In-depth use of selective quantitative and qualitative case data to support position. Response is informed directly by relevant concepts; response demonstrates a clear and in-depth understanding of the concepts; no extraneous concepts invoked. Comprehensive and in-depth use of appropriate quantitative and qualitative case data to support position.   Analyze information and follow logical steps to reach an effective decision. Response does not demonstrate an ability to think holistically; does not integrate internal and external factors and strategy; does not take an organizational perspective; considers functional areas in isolation and takes an operational perspective. Response does not arrive at logical conclusions and inferences. Statements are made and not supporting logic is offered. Response demonstrates some ability to think holistically; integrates a few internal and external factors and some connection to strategy and integrate across a couple of functions. Some evidence of taking an organizational perspective. Response arrives at logical conclusions and inferences. Statements are made and some supporting logic is offered. Response demonstrates a clear ability to think holistically; integrate several internal and external factors to strategy and integrate across multiple functions; clear evidence of an organizational perspective with an understanding of operational issues. Response arrives at very logical conclusions and inferences. Position is well argued and tightly presented with supporting logic. Ability to Series of individual paragraphs that are not well connected nor well presented; paragraphs do not have strong lead Individual paragraphs that are reasonably well connected and cogent; reasonably strong lead sentences; Very well organized response with inter-connected paragraphs. Strong lead sentences; craftsmanship and style
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Seismic attribute-assisted interpretation of incised valley fill geometries: A case study of Anadarko Basin Red Fork interval. Yoscel Suarez*, Chesapeake Energy and The University of Oklahoma, USA Kurt J. Marfurt, The University of Oklahoma, USA Mark Falk, Chesapeake Energy, USA Al Warner , Chesapeake Energy, USA Seismic Attribute Generation Edge Detection Relative Acoustic Impedance The Relative Acoustic Impedance (RAI) is a simplified inversion. This attribute is widely used for lithology discrimination and as a thickness variation indicator. Since the RAI enhances impedance contrast boundaries, it may help delimit different facies within an incised valley-fill complex. Figure 15 shows the better delineation of the different valley-fill episodes. The impedance amplitude variations within the system may be correlated to sand/shale ratios. Higher values of RAI seem to be related to sandier intervals (black arrow). Coherence According to Chopra and Marfurt (2007) coherence is a measure of similarity between waveforms or traces. Peyton et al. (1998) showed the value of this edge detection attribute to identify channel boundaries in the Red Fork level. Figure 11 shows the results of the modern coherence algorithm and the interpretation. The modern coherence algorithm is slightly superior. It shows additional features (blue arrows), and enhances the edge of Phase II (pink arrow). It also shows that the current outlines of Phase II could be modified in the encircled areas. Figure 15. Relative Acoustic Impedance (RAI) at the Red Fork level. Figure 11. Modern coherency horizon slice at the Red Fork level Figure 12. Other modern edge-detector attributes: a) Sobel coherence. b) Energy ratio coherence Energy Weighted Coherent Amplitude Gradients Chopra and Marfurt (2007), by using a wedge model, demonstrate that waveform difference detection algorithms are insensitive to waveform changes below tuning frequencies. In this study the energy ratio coherence, defined by the coherent energy normalized by the total energy of the traces within the calculation window, and the Sobel coherence, which is a measure of relative changes in amplitude were used. Figure 12 shows a horizon slice of the energy ratio coherence and the Sobel coherence at the Red Fork level. The results from these two energy weighted routines are very similar to the coherence attribute, however the level of detail of the coherency algorithm is greater in the encircled areas. Even though both algorithms show similar features, the Sobel coherence seems to be more affected by the acquisition footprint than does the energy ratio coherence. Seismic Attribute Blending Peak Frequency and Peak Amplitude Displays Liu and Marfurt (2007) show that by combining the peak frequency and peak amplitude volumes extracted from the spectral decomposition analysis, the interpreter can identify highly tuned intervals. Low peak frequency values correlate with thicker intervals and high peak frequencies with thinner features. Figures 16 (a,b) show the peak frequency and peak amplitude volumes respectively. Figure 16(c) shows the combination of both displays, which simplifies the interpretation of multiple volumes of data. Figure 16(d) shows the blended image with the overlain geological interpretation. This combination iof attributes shows a better definition of the Phases boundaries especially the Phase II in the NW corner of the survey, in between the two valley branches. The changes in facies within the Phase V are evident in the southernmost green arrow. The differentiation between the Phase III and Phase V is sharper (northernmost green arrow). Outside of the incised valley system the lithology relationship with frequency is still unclear. The dashed orange lines show the proposed changes to the Phase II outline. Curvature Although successful in delineating channels in Mesozoic rocks in Alberta, Canada (Chopra and Marfurt, 2008), for this study, volumetric curvature does not provide images of additional interpretational value. While the Red Fork channel boundaries can be delineated using this attribute (Figure 13), the results shown by the coherence and spectral decomposition are superior. In this situation the acquisition footprint negatively impacts the lateral resolution quality of the attribute. Blue arrows indicate channel edges. Figure 13. Other modern edge-detector attributes: a) Sobel coherence. b) Energy ratio coherence Figure 16. Peak Frequency and Peak Amplitude analysis at the Red Fork level. (a) Peak Frequency volume, red corresponds to higher frequencies. (b) Peak Amplitude volume, white corresponds to higher peak amplitude values. (c) Peak frequency and peak amplitude blended volume. The co-rendered image shows valley-fill boundaries. (d) co-rrendered image with interpretation Spectral Decomposition Matching pursuit spectral decomposition was used to generate individual frequency volumes as well as peak amplitude and peak frequency datasets. Castagna et al. (2003) discuss the value of using matching pursuit spectral decomposition and how we can associate different “tuning frequencies” to different reservoir properties like fluid content, thickness and/or lithology. Figure 14 shows a matching pursuit 36 Hz spectral component at the Red Fork level. The level of detail using matching pursuit spectral decomposition is superior to that provided by the DFT Figure 14. 36 Hz matching pursuit spectral decomposition. Note the enhanced level of detail offered by the matching pursuit spectral decomposition. a) without geological interpretation b) with geological interpretation This study has identified correlations between attribute expressions of Red Fork channels that can be applied to underexploited exploration areas in the Mid-continent, and to fluvial deltaic channels in Paleozoic rocks in general. When it comes to answer the key questions discussed at the beginning of this paper, we learned that the coherence and energy weighted attributes help improve the resolution of subtle features like small channels and channel levees. They also help differentiate the cutbank from the gradational inner bank. It is also evident from this study that even though there have been some improvements in the coherence routines, the differences between current algorithms with the ones applied by Peyton et al. in 1998 are minimal. Additionally, detailed channel geomorphology and lithology discrimination were possible by introducing the spectral decomposition and relative acoustic impedance attributes in the analysis. On one hand, the use of spectral decomposition helped define different facies within the channel system and increased the resolution of channel boundaries. On the other hand, the variations in the RAI values were found to be correlative to lithology infill, for instance higher values of RAI show direct relationship to shalier intervals within the channel complex. One of the key findings of this study is the great value that blended images of attributes bring to the interpreter. Such technology was not available ten years ago. But today, by combining multiple attributes, fluvial facies delineation is possible when co-rendering edge detection attributes with lithology indicators. It is important to mention that the signal/noise ratio of the data is a key factor that will determine the resolution and quality of the seismic attribute response. In this study, curvature did not provide images of additional interpretational value. These unsatisfactory results may be related to acquisition footprint contamination. Therefore, footprint removal methods will be performed in an attempt to enhance signal-tonoise ratio. Acknowledgments We thank Chesapeake Energy for their support in this research effort. We give special thanks to Larry Lunardi, Carroll Shearer, Mike Horn, Mike Lovell and Travis Wilson for their valuable contribution and feedback. And to my closest friends Carlos Santacruz and Luisa Aurrecoechea for cheering me up at all times. Amplitude Variability Semblance of the Relative Acoustic Impedance Chopra and Marfurt (2007) define semblance as “the ratio of the energy of the average trace to the average energy of all the traces along a specified dip.” Since RAI has sharper facies boundaries the semblance computed from RAI should be crisper than semblance computed from the conventional seismic. Figure 17 shows the value of combining these attributes. Outside of the channel complex the lithology relationship with frequency is still unclear(red arrow). The yellow arrow points to a potential fluvial channel outside of the incised valley-system. The dashed orange lines show the proposed changes to the Phase II outline. Conclusions Figure 17 a) the Semblance of the RAI and b) RAI and RAI semblance blended image. The combination of both attributes helps delineate Relative Acoustic Impedance boundaries.
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Compensation Plan for NEOs  Eliminate executive annual bonus plan (the 162 (m) plan) and use executive plan as SPX did for 2012    Thresholds for Operating Margin and Operating Income should not be set below prior year actual results Equity-based awards should be based (i) 50% on performance versus a rolling 3-year business plan with multiple metrics (margin, operating profit, and ROIC) and (ii) 50% on TSR over a rolling three year period TSR should be measured against the S&P MidCap 400 Industrials Index MidCap 400 Industrials Number of companies    Composite 1500 Industrials 67 212 Mean Market Cap $3.7B $8.6B SPX Market Cap $3.5B $3.5B Threshold, target, and maximum payouts should be based on 3-year TSR percentile ranking Payouts capped at 100% if absolute TSR is negative Other benefits and perquisites         Eliminate relocation loans for NEOs Eliminate “single-trigger” treatment following change-of-control Eliminate 280G tax “gross-ups” Eliminate incremental match ($30,000) of contribution for NEOs Eliminate post-retirement key manager life insurance benefit Eliminate executive retiree medical benefit Eliminate car allowance, country club dues, financial planning, executive physical, and long-term executive disability plan Add supplemental executive choice plan to cover miscellaneous perks up to $100,000 for CEO and $75,000 for other NEOs
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From Phillips’: USGS_SFDEPTH GX – as implemented in Oasis Montaj The following model-specific special functions are supported : Assumed_Source_Type SI Transform Model-Specific_Special_Function Vertical_Magnetic_Contact Vertical Magnetic Sheet Horizontal Magnetic Sheet Horizontal Magnetic Line Vertical Magnetic Line Magnetic Dipole Vertical Density Contact Vertical Density Sheet Horizontal Density Sheet Horizontal Density Line Vertical Density Line Point Mass 0 1 1 2 2 3 -1 0 0 1 1 2 RTP HGM of RTP magnetic field RTP ABS of RTP magnetic field RTP+VI HGM of VI of RTP magnetic field RTP+VI ABS of VI of RTP magnetic field RTP+VI ABS of VI of RTP magnetic field RTP+VI ABS of VI of RTP magnetic field VD HGM of VD of gravity field VD ABS of VD of gravity field None HGM of gravity field None ABS of gravity field None ABS of gravity field None ABS of gravity field Model-independent special functions include the Total Gradient (TG) and the Local Wavenumber (LW). These are calculated directly from the potential field or from a vertical integral (VI) of the potential field. The total gradient requires that a structural index (SI) be assumed for the source.
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Webinar Outlines Webinar L1: Part I (today) • • • • • • Introduction and brief overview of the strengths approach A model and framework for assessment in strengths-based TR/RT practice The ecological approach to strengths-based assessment Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Leisure Domain Tools for assessment of global outcomes of TR/RT services: Well-Being Questions, discussion Webinar L2: Part II (October 8) • • • • • • • Brief overview of the strengths approach and a framework for assessment from Part I Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Psychological/Emotional Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Cognitive Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Social Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Physical Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Spiritual Domain Questions, discussion 3
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Webinar Outlines Webinar L1: Part I (October 1) • • • • • • Introduction and brief overview of the strengths approach A model and framework for assessment in strengths-based TR/RT practice The ecological approach to strengths-based assessment Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Leisure Domain Tools for assessment of global outcomes of TR/RT services: Well-Being Questions, discussion Webinar L2: Part II (today) • • • • • • • Brief overview of the strengths approach and a framework for assessment from Part I Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Psychological/Emotional Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Cognitive Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Social Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Physical Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Spiritual Domain Questions, discussion 3
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Internal Audit Responsibilities 1. Develop an annual internal audit plan using risk-based methodology including the consideration of any risks or control concerns identified by management. 2. Submit the plan along with a financial budget, human resource plan and any resource limitations or significant interim changes to the President and Executive and Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees for review and approval. 3. Implement the annual internal audit plan and report results to the President and Executive and Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees. 4. Periodically provide information to the President and Executive and Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees on the status and results of the annual internal audit plan, the sufficiency of Internal Audit resources relative to its Objectives and Responsibilities, and emerging trends and successful practices in internal auditing. 5. Provide reports to the Board of Trustees Executive and Audit Committee and President on the implementation status of prior audit recommendations. 6. Provide advisory and consulting services, beyond internal audit assurance services, to assist management in meeting their objectives, including participating in the development or modification of major information systems, significant changes in functions, services, processes, operations, control processes or strategies and substantiation of allegations. 7. Provide an annual assessment on the adequacy and effectiveness of the University’s processes for controlling its activities, managing its risks, governance, and the performance of management responsibilities in the areas set forth in Internal Audit’s Objectives. 8. Report significant issues related to the processes for controlling the activities of the University and its applicable affiliates, including potential improvements to those processes, and provide information concerning such issues through resolution. 9. Assist in the investigation of allegations of fraud or fraudulent actions in accordance with Southern Oregon University fraud policy. 10. Maintain a professional internal audit function with sufficient knowledge, skills, experience, and professional certifications to meet the requirements of this Charter. 11. Report the results of internal and external assessments conducted in association with the Quality Assurance and Improvement Program. 12. Confirm annually the organizational independence of Internal Audit.
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• Boundary pliancy – Boundaries can be rigid, flexible, or enmeshed – Rigid boundaries occur when people have a very narrow perspective on life. They perceive that things must be one way and refuse to change for any reason. – Flexible boundaries occur when people are able to let go of their boundaries as appropriate. Healthy boundaries are flexible. • Enmeshed boundaries occur when two people’s boundaries are so blended together that neither can be sure where one stops and the other begins. An individual with an enmeshed boundary is unable to differentiate his or her wants and needs from those of the other person.
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Effects of Plate Motion: Earthquakes • Divergent tectonic plate boundaries – All activity is near the Earth’s surface • Virtually all earthquakes are shallow – Most rock is relatively warm & soft • Absence of brittle rock reduces earthquake strength • Convergent tectonic plate boundaries – Ocean – ocean boundaries • Deep & strong earthquakes are very common – Ocean – continent boundaries • All depths & strong earthquakes are very common • Transform tectonic plate boundaries – Ocean – ocean boundaries • Absence of brittle rock reduces earthquake strength – Ocean – ocean boundaries • Presence of brittle rock increases earthquake strength
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Problems with Vertical Integration Companies may disintegrate or exit industries adjacent to the industry value chain when encountering disadvantages from the vertical integration:  Cost structure is increasing. • Company-owned suppliers develop a higher cost structure than those of the independent suppliers • Bureaucratic costs of solving transaction difficulties  The technology is changing fast. • Vertical integration may lock into old or inefficient technology • Prevent company from changing to a new technology that could strengthen the business model  Demand is unpredictable.  Creates risk in vertical integration investments. Vertical integration can weaken business model when: • Company-owned suppliers lack incentive to reduce costs • Changing demand or technology reduces ability to be competitive Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 9 | 14
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Barriers to Entry  Barriers to entry are legal or natural impediments protecting a firm from competition from potential new entrants.  Barriers to entry include:  Legal barriers  Ownership barriers  Natural barriers  Of course, firms can create illegal barriers to entry, but this would be a violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
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