PacketIN AFT Usage (April-May 2003 Snapshot)  Roll-out Plan (Front End) – FY03 – Re-defined structured usecase format (for AFT) – Import baselined SRDs (post Q10) into DOORS current release (AHE R24.1, ISG3.0, TLP3.0) – Document SRD using DOORS (eSAE R24.1, eSAE R24.1 SU1)  AHE – R24.1 (SRD: 3 of 3 complete; MIB Chgs for R24.2) – DOORS: SDHLR OA&M Recovery, MIB Chgs; CORC updates; BMC Patrol – Rose Designs: SDHLR OA&M Recovery – AFT/TMS Usage: metrics collection only  eSAE – R24.1 (SRD: 5 of 5 completed) – DOORS: Filter Conditions; CORC; VARCHAR; TimesTen; Service Key – Rose Designs: – AFT/TMS usage: TimesTen; CORC; Service Key  eSAE – R24.1 SU1 (SRD: 2 of 2 completed) – DOORS: Atomic Transactions; Custom View Tool – Rose Designs: – AFT/TMS usage: Atomic Transactions; Custom View Tool  ISG – R3.0 (SRD: 12 of 12 completed) – DOORS: PAM; FW; XGW; MiLife SDK; Camel CC/UI; PM; DIR, UL; US;PM;CHAM; MSG – Rose Designs (100%): FW; ISG PacketIN SDK; UL; US;PM;PAM; MiLife SDK;CHAM; DIR; Camel CC/UI, MSG – AFT/TMS usage: MSG; CHAM (metrics); US; FW; PM; UL; XGW; PAM (metrics)  Teleportal – R3.0 (SRD: 3 of 3 completed) – DOORS: DNS; DTMF; Faster Barge – Rose Designs: n/a (designs 100% complete; AFT not applicable to SPA work) – AFT/TMS usage: metrics collection only 87
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Control of Extraneous Variables Limited-Population Designs Experimental designs in which participants are sampled from a limited population so as to standardize participants’ background. Example: College Students. Before-After Designs Experimental designs in which participants are at first asked to complete baseline measure and then are assigned to a experimental condition. Example: Word Memory Matched-Group Designs Experimental designs in which participants are measured on the variable of interest before the experiment begins and then are assigned to conditions on the basis of their scores on that variable. Example: IQ test. Standardization of Conditions Experimental manipulation in which all participants in all levels of the independent variable are treated in exactly the same way. Examples: Script, Protocol, and Automated Experiments
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Design of Experiments  Full factorial designs  Fractional factorial designs  Response surface designs » Central composite designs » Box-Behnken designs  D-optimal designs – minimize the volume of the confidence ellipsoid of the regression estimates of the linear model parameters
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Graphics that show progression help the reader grasp the order of events. Long Term Plan (2018 & Forward): Once IBC establishes itself with a large membership presence, the current executive board members must effectively train the younger individuals in the organization the necessary skills to ensure the organization’s long term survival. This includes a deep understanding of the case frameworks and an understanding of the administrative tasks that accompany an organization. From there, IBC should look to establish a deep network of alumni who are professionals in the consulting field. As the organization grows, the alumni base will become more significant, starting a cycle of recruitment opportunities that improve ever year. First Year Plan (2017 – 2018): In August of 2017, IBC executives established the organization on-campus through the Student Organization Business Office (SOBO), providing Iowa Business Consulting with access to important university resources and recruiting opportunities. In September of 2017, the executive board established the organization’s general practices, including organizational case frameworks, training and layout, which are primarily based off of the Harvard Business School framework for solving case problems. In October of 2017, the IBC team put new members through case training and a series of sample cases designed to test their problem solving ability. By February of 2017, IBC hopes to initiate client engagements by sending managing directors into the field to scout opportunities and consult on the organization’s first 4 case projects. Once IBC establishes itself with a large membership presence, the current executive board members must effectively train the younger individuals in the organization the necessary skills to ensure the organization’s long term survival. This includes a deep understanding of the case frameworks and an understanding of the administrative tasks that accompany an organization. From there, IBC should look to establish a deep network of alumni who are professionals in the consulting field. As the organization grows, the alumni base will become more significant, starting a cycle of recruitment opportunities that improve ever year. The primary goal of Iowa Business Consulting is to prepare students for interviews and on-job success. August 2018: Establish beginning steps of alumni base in the consulting industry through current member job placement May 2018: Turn the organization over to young leadership team with the hopes of continuing the organization on pre-established framework February 2017: Initiate client engagements, sending managing directors into the field to scout opportunities to consult on 4 case projects October 2017: Initiated new members, putting the team through case training and a series of sample cases designed to test their problem solving ability October 2017: Recruiting initial class of 20 members, selected via applications and intensive interview process including behavioral, market-sizing, and brain-teaser questions September 2017: Established general practices, including organizational case frameworks, training, and layout August 2017: Established IBC as an official on-campus organization
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CPT: Confidentiality, Privacy and Trust  Before I as a user of Organization A send data about me to organization B, I read the privacy policies enforced by organization B If I agree to the privacy policies of organization B, then I will send data about me to organization B If I do not agree with the policies of organization B, then I can negotiate with organization B  Even if the web site states that it will not share private information with others, do I trust the web site  Note: while confidentiality is enforced by the organization, privacy is determined by the user. Therefore for confidentiality, the organization will determine whether a user can have the data. If so, then the organization van further determine whether the user can be trusted -
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V. I.V.’s and D.V.’s • A. Factorial Designs • Separate Group For Each I.V. Level • Main Effects • Interactions • Factorial Within Subjects Designs • Higher Order Factorial Designs • B. Other Group-Based Designs • C. Multivariate Designs – More D.V.’s. 17
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Towards Definitions Label Actor Parent Class AgentRole Ontology Definition An AgentRole wherein an Agent takes part in some intentional behavior Organization Continuant Entity (Agent) An organization is a continuant entity which can play roles, has members, and has a set of organization rules. Members of organizations are either organizations themselves or individual people. Members can bear specific organization member roles that are determined in the organization rules. The organization rules also determine how decisions are made on behalf of the organization by the organization members. http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/OBI_0000245 Person Continuant Entity (Agent) ArtifactRole An Object that is a human being (homo spaiens) Facility Materiel (Object) Area Event Artifact Action Feature Process Quality Spatial Region Entity An ArtifactRole wherein some object facilitates an action, operation, or course of conduct An Artifact which is the bearer of some EquipmentRole for some Organization A Spatial Region which is serving a special function (Role) An Entity that has temporal parts and that happens, unfolds, or develops through time A Process in which at least one Agent plays a causative role. A Quality which is any prominent characteristic of some Object or Event
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Four Questions of Program Evaluation • Needs: Is an agency or organization meeting the needs of the people it serves? (survey designs) • Process: How is a program being implemented (is it going as planned)? (observational designs) • Outcome: Has a program been effective in meeting its stated goals? (experimental, quasiexperimental designs; archival data) • Efficiency: Is a program cost-efficient relative to alternative programs? (experimental, quasiexperimental designs; archival data)
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Graphics that show progression help the reader grasp the order of events. Long Term Plan (2018 & Forward): Once IBC establishes itself with a large membership presence, the current executive board members must effectively train the younger individuals in the organization the necessary skills to ensure the organization’s long term survival. This includes a deep understanding of the case frameworks and an understanding of the administrative tasks that accompany an organization. From there, IBC should look to establish a deep network of alumni who are professionals in the consulting field. As the organization grows, the alumni base will become more significant, starting a cycle of recruitment opportunities that improve ever year. First Year Plan (2017 – 2018): In August of 2017, IBC executives established the organization on-campus through the Student Organization Business Office (SOBO), providing Iowa Business Consulting with access to important university resources and recruiting opportunities. In September of 2017, the executive board established the organization’s general practices, including organizational case frameworks, training and layout, which are primarily based off of the Harvard Business School framework for solving case problems. In October of 2017, the IBC team put new members through case training and a series of sample cases designed to test their problem solving ability. By February of 2017, IBC hopes to initiate client engagements by sending managing directors into the field to scout opportunities and consult on the organization’s first 4 case projects. Once IBC establishes itself with a large membership presence, the current executive board members must effectively train the younger individuals in the organization the necessary skills to ensure the organization’s long term survival. This includes a deep understanding of the case frameworks and an understanding of the administrative tasks that accompany an organization. From there, IBC should look to establish a deep network of alumni who are professionals in the consulting field. As the organization grows, the alumni base will become more significant, starting a cycle of recruitment opportunities that improve ever year. The primary goal of Iowa Business Consulting is to prepare students for interviews and on-job success.
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Why should an organization do strategic planning?            The primary motive for organizations to do strategic planning is to learn and to make decisions about the future of the organization based on that learning. There are many specific reasons for an organization to initiate a strategic planning process, including the following: To give the organization better control over external forces To serve as a tool for decision making and resource allocation To bring everyone together in the organization so that they are on the same wavelength To raise board members’ awareness of current issues and operations To reawaken and motivate key people within the organization To position the agency for a merger or joint venture To create a document suitable for fundraising and public relations To increase morale within an organization and develop a sense of trust and cohesion To set the stage for the organization to make a "quantum leap" to a new level of program development or functioning To relate organizational capacity to community need.
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I. Types of Experimental Designs • A. Looking For Cause • B. Quantitative and Qualitative Manipulation • C. Between Subjects Designs • D. Within Subjects Designs • E. Single Subject Designs. 10
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IV. Within Subjects Designs • E. When To Use • Subjects Correlated With D.V. • Economizing On Subjects • Increasing Exposure • F. Versus Matched Groups • G. Types of Within-Subjects Designs • Single Factor Two-Level Designs • Single Factor Multilevel Designs. 16
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Plackett-Burman Designs • These are a different class of resolution III design • The number of runs, N, need only be a multiple of four • N = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, … • The designs where N = 12, 20, 24, etc. are called nongeometric PB designs • See text, page 319 for comments on construction of Plackett-Burman designs DOX 6E Montgomery 27
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Factorial Experimental Designs Factorial Experimental Designs Experimental designs with more than one independent variable. The term factor refer to each of manipulated independent variables. Example. IV. Sex (male, female), Ethnicity (Black, White, Asian, Latino) DV. Self-esteem 2 levels Black White Asian M 20 24 19 20 F 24 18 20 21 2 Factors 4 levels Ratino Cells 2  4 designs
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Input Levels  Input level selection • Low & high limits define operating regime • Must be chosen carefully to ensure feasibility  Two-level designs • Two possible values for each input (low, high) • Most efficient & economical • Ideal for screening designs  Three-level designs • Three possible values for each input (low, normal, high) • Less efficient but yield more information • Well suited for response surface designs
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Part IV: Experimental Design and Analysis         Introduction to Experimental Design 2k Factorial Designs 2kr Factorial Designs with Replications 2k-p Fractional Factorial Designs One Factor Experiments Two Factors Full Factorial Design without Replications Two Factors Full Factorial Design with Replications General Full Factorial Designs With k Factors 13
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Outline        Introduction Terminology General Mistakes Simple Designs Full Factorial Designs 2k Factorial Designs 2kr Factorial Designs 6
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Outline        Introduction Terminology General Mistakes Simple Designs Full Factorial Designs 2k Factorial Designs 2kr Factorial Designs 11
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Outline        Introduction Terminology General Mistakes Simple Designs Full Factorial Designs 2k Factorial Designs 2kr Factorial Designs 14
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Outline        Introduction Terminology General Mistakes Simple Designs Full Factorial Designs 2k Factorial Designs 2kr Factorial Designs 17
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Outline        Introduction Terminology General Mistakes Simple Designs Full Factorial Designs 2k Factorial Designs (Chapter 17) 2kr Factorial Designs (Chapter 18) 31
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Who Builds Robots? • • • • ECE - designs “the brain”, sensors, actuators & wiring. ME - designs body, gearing, actuators IME - designs and integrates controls. CS – designs robot software All disciplines listed above work together to design/build robots.
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BOX 9.4 ADVANTAGES OF SINGLE-SUBJECT DESIGNS OVER GROUP DESIGNS: LESS CAN BE MORE • Single-subject experimental designs may be more appropriate than multiple-group designs for certain kinds of applied research – when research is directed toward changing the behavior of a specific individual. • Outcome of a group experiment may lead to recommendations about what treatments are effective “in general” in modifying behavior. – In a multiple-group design, a potentially beneficial treatment must be withheld from individuals in order to provide a control group
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Collaborative Examinations in ALN (Shen et al, 2004) Traditional Participatory Collaborative Instructor designs questions Individual designs questions (A) Group designs questions (A-C) Individual designs Individual reviews questions Individual reviews questions Individual reviews questions Individual answers questions Individual answers questions (B) Individual answers questions (D) Individual grades Group grades Individual grades Instructor assigns grades Instructor assigns grades Individual disputes Individual disputes Instructor assigns final grades Instructor assigns 31grades of 36 final Instructor assigns grades Individual disputes Instructor assigns final grades
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Purpose of E/R Model  The E/R model allows us to sketch database designs.  Kinds of data and how they connect.  Not how data changes.  Designs are pictures called entityrelationship diagrams.  Later: convert E/R designs to relational DB designs. 2
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