Other NSE Benefits • Improve language skills • Access courses not available at home campus • Access to Honors courses • International exchange opportunities • Resident Assistant exchange “I’d do it again in a heartbeat” Nti Awakessien, University of Maine to Univ. of New Orleans 03/18/19 National Student Exchange and rsity of Tennessee - Martin Unive 7
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Judith K. Winn School of Honors Please consider taking Honors courses. Why? • Honors courses have the almost the same curriculum, smaller class sizes, highly motivated peers, and the most scholarly faculty, honors advising, and conference opportunities. • Any new, transfer or continuing student with a GPA of 3.4 or higher can enroll in the program and take Honors classes without a waiting period of any kind. Honors students are also members of the Honors Association, a student run organization supporting the School of Honors’ mission. • Complete 18 credits of Honors classes and maintain an overall GPA of 3.4 or higher and receive an Honors Diploma with the Presidential Seal. Students graduating with an Honors Diploma wear a red sash, red and gold cords and tassel at graduation, and receive special recognition at commencement. Honors students who are also Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) members receive dual Diploma Gold Seals. • Many scholarship opportunities are available to PTK and honors students including: Columbia University, School of General Studies; New York University, Steinhardt School (CCTOP); New Jersey Institute of Technology and William Paterson University. Click here to Register for the JKW School of Honors. Fill out the online form to apply for the School of Honors. Once you are entered into the system, you can register for Honors classes. Please consider joining other national honor societies such Alpha Mu Gamma (foreign language), Psi Beta (psychology) and Sigma Chi Eta (communication). For more information, please visit www.bergen.edu/honors. 34
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Judith K. Winn School of Honors Please consider taking Honors courses. Why? • Honors courses have the almost the same curriculum, smaller class sizes, highly motivated peers, and the most scholarly faculty, honors advising, and conference opportunities. • Any new, transfer or continuing student with a GPA of 3.4 or higher can enroll in the program and take Honors classes without a waiting period of any kind. Honors students are also members of the Honors Association, a student run organization supporting the School of Honors’ mission. • Complete 18 credits of Honors classes and maintain an overall GPA of 3.4 or higher and receive an Honors Diploma with the Presidential Seal. Students graduating with an Honors Diploma wear a red sash, red and gold cords and tassel at graduation, and receive special recognition at commencement. • Many scholarship opportunities are available to PTK and honors students including: Columbia University, School of General Studies; New York University, Steinhardt School (CCTOP); New Jersey Institute of Technology and William Paterson University. Click here to Register for the JKW School of Honors. Fill out the online form to apply for the School of Honors. Once you are entered into the system, you can register for Honors classes. 18
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STUDENT AFFAIRS LEADERSHIP Organizational Chart VICE CHANCELLOR Dr. Shannon Finning SPECIALIZED ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Ann Valentino DIRECTOR CENTER FOR RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL LIFE Rabbi Jacqueline Satlow ASSOCIATE DEAN OF STUDENTS/ DIRECTOR HRE Lucinda Poudrier Aaronson ASSISTANT DIRECTOR COMMUNITY STANDARDS, SAFETY & SECURITY Johanna Bielawski ASSISTANT DIRECTOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION AND ACADEMIC INITIATIVES Michelle Black ASSISTANT DIRECTOR UPPERCLASS RESIDENCES Lydia Johnson ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR Cynthia Cummings DIRECTOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES, INVOLVEVMENT & LEADERSHIP Chris Laib DIRECTOR HEALTH SERVICES Sheila Dorgan EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER Dr. Linda Kent Davis ASSISTANT DIRECTOR HEALTH SERVICES Marianne Sullivan ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER Alyssa Snizek ASSISTANT DIRECTOR SAIL Wayne Williams DIRECTOR, INTERNSHIPS/ EXPERIENTIUAL LEARNING Amelia Alburn ASSISTANT DIRECTOR SAIL Stacy Ploskonka ASSISTANT DIRECTOR HEALTH EDUCATION Beth-Anne Vieira 5 NP, 2 RNs, 2 MAs ASSISTANT DIRECTOR HOUSING OPERATIONS Brad Rohrer CAREER SPECIALIST Racheal Roy CAREER COUNSELOR Colleen Wetterland DIRECTOR OF Public Safety Emil Fioravanti University Police Captain Timothy Sheehan Assistant Director TBA Accountant I Richard Tuttle CRISIS RESPONSE GENERAL MANAGER WUMD RADIO STATION Jennifer Mulcare-Sullivan Medical Leaves Senate Advisor Student Government Association Advisor COMMENCEMENT Student Fee Allocation Committee ASSISTANT DIRECTOR COUNSELING SERVICES Dr. Sarah Fraser ASSISTANT DIRECTOR COUNSELING SERVICES TBA Director of Environmental Health & Safety Robert Casparius Psychologist Dr. David Perry University Police Lieutenants John Souza Maurice Dore Eric Vanasse Psychologist Psychologist Dr. Dr. Nicholas Nicholas Olendzski Olendzski University Police Sergeants Mark Nataly Victor Jorge Mark Andrade Damon Gomes 16 University Police Officers Convocation DIRECTOR COUNSELING SERVICES Dr. Catherine Perry BUSINESS MANAGER Barbara Costa 11 Resident Directors 128 Resident Assistants Graduate Student June 2018 Assessment 3 Institutional Security Officers 5 Communications Dispatchers ASSOCIATE DEAN OF STUDENTS Shelly Metivier Scott DIRECTOR CENTER FOR ACCESS AND SUCCESS Wendi Chaka ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR CAS Joshua Crary ENDEAVOR SCHOLARS Social Worker Nancy Harper ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT II Karen Pimentel DIRECTOR STUDENT CONDUCT & DISPUTE RESOLUTION Mary Beckwith Orientation PROGRAM Veteran and Commuter Students DEPUTY COORDINATOR FOR TITLE IX Student Leaves Environmental Health & Safety Specialist Amy Pacheco Environmental Health & Safety Coordinator Brian Serrecchio FALL FAMILY WEEKEND Evening/Weeke ndEVENING/ ON-CALL WEEKEND Coordinator ON CALL COORDINATOR Student Advocacy Food Insecure Homeless and Foster Students DIRECTOR FREDERICK DOUGLASS UNITY HOUSE Nicole Williams ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FDUH LaSella Hall ASSISTANT DEAN OF STUDENTS/ DIRECTOR CENTER FOR WOMEN, GENDER & SEXUAITY Dr. Juli Parker ASST DIRECTOR FOR ADVOCACY & EDUCATION Jessica Harris
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Mark King DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Bureau of Remediation & Waste Management 17 State House Station Augusta, ME 04333-0017 Phone: 207-592-0455 OR 1-800-452-1942 [email protected] Maine DEP—Division of Sustainability (Compost Education and Technical Support) Or The Individuals Below Maine DEP—Residuals Utilization Unit (Licensing Support and Technical Assistance) Augusta Region Carla Hopkins, Unit Supervisor Statewide Assistance Phone: (207) 215-3314 Mark King, Environmental Specialist E-mail: [email protected] Tel: (207) 592-0455 E mail: [email protected] Bangor Region Rick Haffner Phone: (207) 941-4331 E-mail: [email protected] Augusta Region Jim Pollock Phone: (207) 592-8343 George [email protected] MacDonald, Director E-mail: Tel: (207) 287-2870 E mail: Region Bangor [email protected] Roger Johnstone Phone: (207) 557-1173 E-mail: [email protected] Portland Region Mike Clark Phone: (207) 822-6300 E-mail: [email protected] Northern Maine Region Jay Duncan Phone: (207) 760-3165 E-mail: [email protected] MAINE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION www.maine.gov/dep
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Licensed Beds Hurricane Katrina Outcome Extensive Damage No Damage Current (2008) Status Demolished Limited Damage Limited Damage Limited Damage No Damage Limited Damage Extensive Damage Open Extensive Damage Extensive Damage Closed 199 Pre-Hurricane Katrina Ownership Investor-owned (Universal Health Svcs) Investor-owned (Tenet) West Jefferson Medical Center (Jefferson) East Jefferson General Hospital (Jefferson) Ochsner Medical Center (Jefferson) Tulane-Lakeside Hospital (Jefferson) Children’s Hospital (Orleans) Lindy Boggs Medical Center (Orleans) 451 Not-for-profit 435 Not-for-profit 456 Not-for-profit 102 218 Investor-owned (Hospital Corporation of America) Not-for-profit None Investor-owned (Tenet) MCL/NO Charity Hospital (Orleans) MCL/NO University Hospital (currently known as LSU Interim Public Hospital) (Orleans) None Public 391 Public Memorial Medical Center (currently known as Ochsner Baptist) (Orleans) 25 Investor-owned (Tenet) Extensive Damage Purchased by Ochsner Methodist Hospital (Orleans) Touro Infirmary (Orleans) Tulane University Hospital (Orleans) Veterans Administration Hospital (Orleans) None Investor-owned (Universal Health Svcs) Not-for-profit Moderate Damage Limited Damage Moderate Damage Extensive Damage Closed Facility (Parish) Chalmette Medical Center (St. Bernard) Meadowcrest Hospital (now Ochsner Westbank) (Jefferson) None 506 243 None Investor-owned (Hospital Corporation of America) Federal government Purchased by Ochsner Open Open Open Open Sold; slated for demolition Open Open Open Closed Status of New Orleans Acute Care Hospitals (2008)
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FY 2003/2004 Budget DevelopmentNew Faculty Positions Funded Department Title Name Salary Marketing Assistant Professor Suh, Taewon 75,024 CIS Assistant Professor To Be Named 82,000 Finance & Economics Assistant Professor To Be Named 85,000 Curriculum & Instruction Assistant Professor To Be Named 47,481 Art & Design Assistant Professor Blanco, Ivanette 43,128 Unallocated 7,171 Undergraduate Education 339,804 EAPS Assistant Professor To Be Named 48,000 Mass Communications Assistant Professor To Be Named 42,000 Finance & Economics Assistant Professor To Be Named 91,000 Family & Consumer Science Assistant Professor To Be Named 45,000 CIS & Quantitative Methods Assistant Professor To Be Named 75,000 Anthropology Assistant Professor To Be Named 38,000 Curriculum & Instruction Assistant Professor To Be Named 48,000 Art & Design Assistant Professor To Be Named 48,000 Special Opportunities (3-4) Assistant Professor To Be Named 354,139 Advising and OSFA Savings 789,139 Aquatic Resources Ph.D. Assistant Professor, 12-month Huston ,Michael 95,319 Aquatic Resources Ph.D. Assistant Professor, 12-month To Be Named 85,029 Assistant Professor To Be Named 70,200 Education Ph.D. New Program 250,548 6
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Why am I a CSA Campus Security Authorities: UW-Parkside encourages a culture of reporting. The following individuals are designated as campus security authorities and are trained on the proper reporting procedures: • University Police & Public Safety - all members of the University Police & Public Safety Department, including all sworn law enforcement officers, community service officers, dispatchers, and any limited term employee(s). • Administrators – all members of the offices of Vice Provost for Student Affairs & Enrollment Services, Office of Equity and Diversity including the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators, and the Dean of Students Office including the Dean, Associate/Assistant Dean(s). • Housing & Residence Life – all members of the Residence Life Office who work directly with students including the Director, Associate/Assistant Director(s), Hall Director(s), Resident Advisor(s), Desk Staff, & Summer Conference Assistant(s). • Campus Activities and Engagement – all members of the Campus Activities and Engagement Office which include all Group Advisors to student organizations, Faculty/Staff who directly advise academic/honorary organizations, and any individual who directly oversees a specific programming group. • Student Center – all members of the Student Center staff including Director, Associate/Assistant Director(s), and all student employees serving in any capacity in the building. • Athletics – all members of Athletics including Director, Associate/Assistant Director(s), Athletic Training/Sports Medicine Staff, Team Coaches, Team Associate/Assistant(s), and Volunteer Coaches. • Academic Advisors – all campus individuals who serve in the role of Academic Advisor including the Advising and Career Center, Student Support Services, Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, and Professional College/Departmental Advisors. • International Student Services/Study Abroad – all members of the office and all faculty/staff who work with International Student Program(s) or Study Abroad Program(s). Providers at the Student Health & Counseling Center are the only individuals on campus who are designated as “Confidential”. Providers are required to report that an incident has occurred for statistical purposes only and may, if requested by the reporting person, include or not include any information that could identify a specific person(s).
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Exploring Participation • Talk to parents • Meet with campus NSE Coordinator • Study the NSE Directory • Visit www.nse.org • Review campus catalogs • Consult academic advisor • Determine if financial resources are sufficient for the exchange • Talk to financial aid officer 03/18/19 National Student Exchange and rsity of Tennessee - Martin Unive 9
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STUDENT AFFAIRS ANNUAL REPORT: GOALS STATED FOR 2014-2015 Goal 1: Increase Student Affairs engagement, outreach, and service • Evaluate current levels of communication with prospective, accepted and enrolled students and their engagement in programming and other campus activities. Apply findings to develop communication plans for all Student Affairs units • Increase Health Center utilization by 20%. • Continue early communication outreach and recruiting efforts to increase overall student-athlete rosters by 20%. • Develop partnerships with at least 3 community organizations to enhance referrals for students, to expand opportunities for participation in on campus programming and to highlight student success • Continue to build social media presence and explore new ways to communicate with students regarding programs and services Goal 2: Enhance Student Affairs programs and services to positively impact student retention, graduation and success. • Design and implement at least 4 small group experiences for students with the Dean of Student Services. • Provide at least 2 opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and build their identities as student leaders. • Create a peer advisory group by December 15, 2014 to aid in educating the student body about the top diagnoses in the Health and Wellness Center and to assist educational health programs offered in collaboration with Campus Housing and Residence Life • Investigate an Alternative Winter Break (AWB) in the DC area with facilitation from the Campus Ministry student intern for service • Institute mandatory study tables during fall, winter and spring seasons to improve overall academic performance of student-athletes to maintain a minimum of a 3.0 overall average • Student Affairs staff will collaborate to present at least 4 educational programs (at least 2 per semester) open and advertised to all students. Goal 3: Enhance Data Collection and Assessment • Conduct an assessment of on campus residents to gather feedback on strengths and areas of improvement in the quality of life for residential students to contribute to changes in programming or services that contribute to an increase in the retention of students living on campus from fall 2014 to spring 2015 by 2.5% and from spring 2015 to fall 2015 by 10%. • Enhance data collection and analysis of student involvement and engagement in Student Activities, Campus Traditions, and Athletics events. • Establish a Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) – two athletes per team who will all meet twice a semester with Assistant Director to provide direct feedback on initiatives, athlete experience and service projects. 77
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Application and Placement Process • • • • • • • • Meet with academic advisor Complete UT Martin NSE application Interview with campus NSE Coordinator Attend campus pre-placement meeting Attend campus post-placement meeting Consult with financial aid officer Complete advising agreement Read, complete and return materials to host coordinator in a timely manner 03/18/19 National Student Exchange and rsity of Tennessee - Martin Unive 13
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Why NSE? As part of the NSE Experience, you have the opportunity to… • Broaden your personal and educational perspectives • Explore and appreciate new cultures • Experience personal growth • Become more independent and resourceful • Live in a different area …all while studying at another NSE member institution 03/18/19 National Student Exchange and rsity of Tennessee - Martin Unive 5
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Honors by the Numbers • 125 Approximate number of incoming Honors students each year • 3.85 Average unweighted high school GPA of incoming fall 2016 Honors class • 28 Average composite ACT score of incoming fall 2016 Honors class • 8:1 Average student to teacher ratio in Honors courses • 89 Majors across seven colleges have at least one Honors College student in them • 2,086 • 33 • 4000 Dollar scholarships available through the Cohen Enhancement Scholarships program to support any Honors student in good standing to study abroad, take unpaid internships in the public sector, engage in research or creative activity, and travel for national conferences or service learning 6 Hours of Community Service and Engagement given by Honors students in spring 2016 Honors students and faculty earned Community Service and Engagement awards in spring 2016
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