Why NSE? As part of the NSE Experience, you have the opportunity to… • Broaden your personal and educational perspectives • Explore and appreciate new cultures • Experience personal growth • Become more independent and resourceful • Live in a different area …all while studying at another NSE member institution 03/18/19 National Student Exchange and rsity of Tennessee - Martin Unive 5
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REFLECTIVE JOURNALING TOOLS Reflective J ournalingTools LEARNING: • How is practice different from theory? Did this exercise help you to understand your theory and the application of theory better? How? Why? • Did you learn anything that helped you to better understand a theory, the use of a test that you were taught in lectures/labs? • What did you learn that were not taught in lectures (e.g. communication with patients), and how did you cope or learn more about this to improve your performance? Or how can this be incorporated into lectures? • Did this exercise help you to remember or recall later other aspects of previous experiences that you have forgotten? • Did this exercise help you identify areas that need to be changed, improved etc. in yourself/peers/staff/clinical training etc. Why and how? • What actions did you take you take and what are the results (what did you learn)? SELF ASSESSMENT: • Did you identify areas/issues that you were unclear of, or disagreed with your supervisors/peers, or different from what you have learned in your past lectures? Justify the actions taken. Did this help you in your learning? How? • Have you been open to share with others and to listen what others have to say? • Have you paid attention to both your strong and weak points? Can you identify them? What are you going to do about them? • How did faculty supervision/RW help you in your clinical experiences in relation to your professional growth? (eg. did it encourage you to be more independent, to become more confident in professional activities and behaviors etc) • What have you noted about yourself, your learning altitude, your relationship with peers/supervisors etc. that has changed from doing this exercise? COMMUNICATION: • What have you learned from interacting with others (peers/supervisors/staff etc)? • Did your peers gain anything from YOUR involvement in this exercise and vice versa? • Did this exercise encourage and facilitate communication? • Did you clarify with your supervisors/peers about problematic issues identified? Why (not)? What are the results? • How could you/your peers/staff help you overcome negative emotions arising from your work? Did your show empathy for your peers? PROFESSIONALISM: • Did you learn that different situations call for different strategies in management? • What are the good and bad practices that you have identified? How would you suggest to handle the bad/poor practices identified (if any)? • Did you learn to accept and use constructive criticism? • Did you accept responsibility for your own actions? • Did you try to maintain high standard of performance? • Did you display a generally positive altitude and demonstrate self-confidence? • Did you demonstrate knowledge of the legal boundaries and ethics of contact lens practice? EMOTION & PERSONAL GROWTH: • Did you reflect on your feelings when dealing with the case/peers/supervisor (eg. frustration, embarrassment, fear) for this exercise? If not, why not? If yes, who should be responsible — you, your patient or your supervisor? Why? • Did you find reflection (as required for this exercise) helpful, challenging, and enjoyable, change the way you learn? How? Why (not)? • How and what did you do to handle negative emotions arising from doing this subject? How could these feelings be minimized? • Did you try to find out if your feelings were different from your peers? Why? What did you do to help your peers? • Did you reflect on your learning altitude? How was it? Is there room for improvement? How? Why (not)? • What did you learn about your relationship with your peers/supervisors? What did you learn about working with others? Ideas for Reflective Journaling Writing Contributor(s): Dr. Michael Ying and Dr. Pauline Cho
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SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN METHODS 5th Edition System DFD Whitten Bentley Dittman (see book for more readable copy) Most DFDs won’t fit on one or two pages – too many event processes. Instead they must be illustrated in a series of system diagrams that correspond to the structure originally depicted in the functional decomposition diagram. Transactions Product and Availability Products Product and Availability Relevant Transactions Member Member Order Process Member Order Inventory Commitment Inventory Commitmen t Member Subscription Order Warehouse Packing Order Process Subscription Order Packing Order Member Order Confirmation Subscription Order Confirmation New Member Ordered Products Member Updated Member from Order Members New Member Order New Member Ordered Products Address New Member Order Members Member Orders Member Ordered Products Member Orders Deleted Member Order Orders Updated Member Updated Member Order Updated Member from Updated Order Member Order Change Request Deleted Member Ordered Products Ordered Products Member Process Member Order Revision Member Order Confirmation Product and Availability Generate Order Analysis Report Process Member Order Cancelation Updated Member Ordered Products Member Order Cancelation Member Member Order Cancelation Notice End of Day Inventory Commitment Revised Packing Order Warehouse Time Order Analysis Report Club Directors Products Irwin/McGraw-Hill Copyright © 2000 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights res
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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When dealing with the practical implementation of RF applications, there are always some nightmarish  tasks. One is the need to match the different impedances of the interconnected blocks. Typically these  include the antenna to the low-noise amplifier (LNA), power-amplifier output (RFOUT) to the antenna,  and LNA/VCO output to mixer inputs. The matching task is required for a proper transfer of signal and  energy from a "source" to a "load." At high radio frequencies, the spurious elements (like wire inductances, interlayer capacitances, and  conductor resistances) have a significant yet unpredictable impact on the matching network. Above a  few tens of megahertz, theoretical calculations and simulations are often insufficient. In-situ RF lab  measurements, along with tuning work, have to be considered for determining the proper final values.  The computational values are required to set up the type of structure and target component values. There are many ways to do impedance matching, including: Computer simulations: Complex but simple to use, as such simulators are dedicated to differing  design functions and not to impedance matching. Designers have to be familiar with the multiple data  inputs that need to be entered and the correct formats. They also need the expertise to find the useful  data among the tons of results coming out. In addition, circuit-simulation software is not pre-installed  on computers, unless they are dedicated to such an application. Manual computations: Tedious due to the length ("kilometric") of the equations and the complex  nature of the numbers to be manipulated. Instinct: This can be acquired only after one has devoted many years to the RF industry. In short, this  is for the super-specialist. Smith chart: Upon which this article concentrates.
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5. Mean projections and mean student scores are calculated. Student Projection1 Student Score 1 Student Projection 2 Student Score 2 Student Projection 3 Student Score 3 Student Projection 4 Student Score 4 Student Projection 5 Your School Student Score 5 Student Projection 6 Student Score 6 Student Projection 7 Student Score 7 Student Projection 8 Student Score 8 Student Projection 9 Student Score 9 Student Projection 10 Student Score 10 Student Projection 11 Student Score 11 Student Projection 12 Student Score 12 Student Projection 13 Student Score 13 Student Projection 14 Student Score 14 Student Projection 15 Student Score 15 Student Projection 16 Student Score 16 Student Projection 17 Student Score 17 Student Projection 18 Student Score 18 Student Projection 19 Student Score 19 Student Projection 20 Student Score 20 Mean Projected Score Mean Student Score Copyright © 2003. Battelle for Kids
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Introduction to the new mainframe Storage areas in an address space z/OS V1R13 BAR Problem (user) programs Run here LINE CVT (offset 16 (hex10) within PSA) All storage above 2 GB This area is called high virtual storage and is addressable only by programs running in 64-bit mode. It is divided by the high virtual shared area, which is an area of installation-defined size that can be used to establish cross-address space viewable connections to obtained areas within this area. Extended areas above 16 MB This range of areas, which lies above the line (16 MB) but below the bar (2 GB), is a kind of “mirror image” of the common area below 16 MB. They have the same attributes as their equivalent areas below the line, but because of the additional storage above the line, their sizes are much larger. Nucleus This is a key 0, read-only area of common storage that contains operating system control programs. System queue area (SQA) (2048 MBs)This area contains system level (key 0) data accessed by multiple address spaces. The SQA area is not pageable (fixed), which means that it resides in central storage until it is freed by the requesting program. The size of the SQA area is predefined by the installation and cannot change while the operating system is active. Yet it has the unique ability to “overflow” into the CSA area as long as there is unused CSA storage that can be converted to SQA. Pageable link pack area (PLPA), fixed link pack area (FLPA), and modified link pack area (MLPA) This area contains the link pack areas (the pageable link pack area, fixed link pack area, and modified link pack area), which contain system level programs that are often run by multiple address spaces. For this reason, the link pack areas reside in the common area that is addressable by every address space, therefore eliminating the need for each address space to have its own copy of the program. This storage area is below the line and is therefore addressable by programs running in 24-bit mode. CSA This portion of common area storage (addressable by all address spaces) is available to all applications. The CSA is often used to contain data frequently accessed by multiple address spaces. The size of the CSA area is established at system initialization time (IPL) and cannot change while the operating system is active. LSQA/SWA/subpool 228/subpool 230 This assortment of subpools, each with specific attributes, is used primarily by system functions when the functions require address space level storage isolation. Being below the line, these areas are addressable by programs running in 24-bit mode. User Region This area is obtainable by any program running in the user’s address space, including user key programs. It resides below the line and is therefore addressable by programs running in 24-bit mode. System Region This small area (usually only four pages) is reserved for use by the region control task of each address space. Prefixed Save Area (PSA) This area is often referred to as “Low Core.” The PSA is a common area of virtual storage from address zero through 8191 in every address space. There is one unique PSA for every processor installed in a system. The PSA maps architecturally fixed hardware and software storage locations for the processor. Because there is a unique PSA for each processor, from the view of a program running on z/OS, the contents of the PSA can change any time the program is dispatched on a different processor. This feature is unique to the PSA area and is accomplished through a unique DAT manipulation technique called prefixing. © Copyright IBM Corp., 2010. All rights reserved. Page 42 of 85
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Closed Area Checklist - Idea Closed Areas Interview Guide ___Is the media in the area marked properly? (classified, unclassified, and system software) ___Are both classified and unclassified computer equipment affixed with a label indicating their level of processing? ___ Review the visitor log. Pay close attention to the visitor’s company name. Did someone visit from an HVAC service? If so, ask the area custodian what they did. Did they put a hole in the wall or make a change affecting the area integrity or the 147? If so, is it greater than 96 square inches? Did someone visit from Xerox? If so, what did they do while they were there? Did they install a new copy machine with a hard drive? Did this get connected to the classified AIS? Did someone visit from a computer service vendor? If so, what did they do? Did they bring diagnostic equipment with them? If so, did they connect it to the AIS? Did any visitors have “keyboard” access? If so, was that authorized? Dispose of visitor logs from before the last DSS audit ____ Does the 147 note “open storage” of AIS? ____ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Dispose of system paperwork from before the last DSS audit (unless it is still relevant) ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Look around. Is there any new hardware connected to the AIS? If so, what is it? Does it have memory? ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Check the AIS system access list. Are all individuals still active employees? Balance the list against an active employee listing. Bring a list of recently terminated employees with you, too. Are all individuals on the system access list also on the Closed Area access list? If not, why not? Review the Closed Area access list. Do you see anyone who recently terminated? If so, request that they be taken off the Closed Area access list. Were they on the system access list? If so, has their account been disabled? Balance all the lists against each other. Has everyone on the system access list taken the required CBEs? (Verify.) ___ Are there Security posters in the area? ____ Are the FAX machines in the area marked to indicate “for unclassified use only”? ____ Are the shredders marked “for unclassified use only”? ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Do the classified printers have a sign “Output must be treated as classified until reviewed ….?” ___ Are the recycle bins labeled “for unclassified use only”? ____ Are the supplies in the area sufficient? (CD labels, classification labels, coversheets, etc.). ___ Does the area have a “marking guide” poster? ____ Does the area have an updated Security points of contact poster? __ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Before going to audit the system, read about what the system is used for and what it does. This will generate questions and help you understand what goes on in the area ___ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Have a user walk you through the steps they follow when they create classified data. What do they print out? Is it classified? If it’s not classified, do they verify that? How do they know what’s classified? (Do they refer to the program security classification guide? Do they know where the guide is located?) Where do they put the classified when it’s completed? Go look at their safe. Are things marked properly? Ask if the data in the safe is for a current contract. If not, explain the requirements for retention approval. (See NISPOM 5-701) Where does the data or hardware go from there? Is it sent to a customer? What is our relationship with the organization they send it to? Do we have DD Forms 254 in place to/from that organization? What is the classification of what they are working on? Is the system approved up to that level? ___ Do they support IR&D activities? If so, explain how IR&D documents must be marked “IR&D Document,” etc. in accordance with the NISPOM (11-304) ____ Are the above-the-ceiling checks being conducted on the required schedule? Look at the records. Dispose of records from before the last DSS audit __ AIS TEAM MEMBER: Review Trusted Download logs, ask people where the removed media is currently located (stored on a computer, CD, printout), and which method they used for the transfer. DSS is focusing on interviews with employees and may very well ask them to actually demonstrate a trusted download. Ask the employee to walk through the steps with you to prepare them for the audit.
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