Maintaining Ethical Standards While Managing in a Global Environment By: Lukas Smith, Virginia Smith, Brandon Freck
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Figure 4: Logic Model for the Quality Enhancement Plan Figure 6. Logic M odel for the Q uality Enhancement Plan Ra tionale Inputs Activities Outputs Outcome Why is this important? What are we doing now? What will we do? What products, events, & services will lead to program outcomes? What learning outcomes will be achieved? • Students must be C urriculum • Global learning content in general education (core) courses • Global learning content in selected academic majors representing each academic college • Collaboration with community resources with global focus to support course assignments • Study abroad program prepared to compete in a global market • Students must understand their role within an international community • Students need to be prepared to engage in increasingly diverse communities C o-Curricular • Global learning/engagement activities sponsored by student organizations • Freshman common read program • International learning community in residence hall Budget to support QEP activities • $1,153,233 budgeted over five year implementation period C urriculum • Incorporate global learning/engagement content/activities in general education (core) discipline courses • Conduct curriculum mapping for coursework in selected majors to enhance global learning/engagement C ampus Initiatives • Increase service learning opportunities within Study Abroad program • Coordinate student recognition and curriculum development activities with the Service Learning program C o-Curricular • Expand global learning/engagement activities sponsored by Student organizations • Increase international interactions C ommunity • Increase collaborative work with community organizations to support global learning/engagement activities • Increase collaborative work with international organizations to support global learning/engagement activities Curriculum E nhance ment • Number of general education (core) courses modified to include global learning/engagement activities • Number of courses in academic majors modified to include global learning/engagement activities • Number of students by college participating in global learning/engagement courses • Number and type of faculty participating in professional development activities and learning communities Co-Curricular • Number of student organizations sponsoring global learning/engagement activities • Number and demographics of students participating in global learning/engagement activities Community • Number of community organizations supporting global learning/engagement activities • Number of international organizations supporting global learning/engagement activities Knowledge • Students identify, describe, and explain global and intercultural conditions and interdependencies. • Students make informed critical assessments of global events, processes, trends and issues and convey the interconnectedness of political, economic and environmental systems. Skills • Students analyze, interpret, and evaluate global and intercultural issues via engagement strategies including the use of information technologies. • Students demonstrate an ability to communicate and interact effectively with members of other cultures. Attitude s • Students reflect upon and integrate global learning and engagement experiences. • Students recognize and appreciate cultural diversity and multiple world views.
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Informal Design Guidelines (4) SUPPLIER_INFO SUPPLIER_LOC SUPPLIER S# Name Status Name City S# Name Status City 01 Smith Y Smith Columbus 01 Smith Y Columbus 02 Smith N Smith Boston 02 Smith N Boston SUPPLIER_INFO * SUPPLIER_LOC S# Name Status Name City 01 Smith Y Smith Columbus 01 Smith Y Smith Boston 02 Smith N Smith Columbus 02 Smith N Smith Boston    Two different companies with the same name Original SUPPLIER table shows one line for each Querying modified schema – spurious tuples  Why? Poor choice of match condition for the SUPPLIER_LOC table 20
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PC Lab (Room 114) Team Gold Trogdor Floffy Rainbox Uncorn The Brick !(NaN==NaN)! ↑ ↑ nearly as good as ↑ ↑ SecurityExceptions UnsupportedOperationExceptions NullPointerExceptions ArrayStoreExceptions Egyptian Brackets Baby Got Back Pokemon Exceptions Min-Flow Max-Cut WVU Tech - Orange Iguana Institution Bridgewater College James Madison University Longwood University Longwood University Radford University Radford University University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Virginia Tech West Virginia University Institute of Technology Location DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114
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So…Where Have You Been? In this assignment, I would like you to help me compile a composite profile of Thinking Geographically students’ geographic experience. Attached are three blank maps: one of Virginia’s localities; one of the United States; and one of the world (with enlarged insets for Europe and the Middle East). On each, shade in all of the localities, states, and countries you have traveled through or visited. You must have been on the ground in each locality, state, or country; airport layovers or airport hotel stays and travel through by train do not count!. Use whatever kind of marker you like (I prefer the medium highlighters with sharp and wide surfaces, but marking pens that won’t bleed through, colored pencils, and even crayons will do), as long as it’s easily seen on the maps. Virginia map – (1) color-in the localities you have been in and/or through. You may need to consult a Virginia highway map to figure out which Commonwealth localities you’ve experienced. For example, if you’ve been from Fairfax County to Longwood via US 15, from north to south, you’ve been through Fairfax, Prince William, Fauquier, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Prince Edward Counties. From the City of Richmond to Virginia Beach via I-64, I-664, and I-264/Virginia Beach Expressway, you would have been in Richmond City, Henrico, New Kent, James City, and York Counties, and Newport News, Hampton, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach Cities. All of the places you’ve been in Virginia should be contiguous (strung together) unless you flew/parachuted in, came in by boat, or snuck in through a neighboring state. If you’ve been to all but a handful of localities, you may mark those you have not been to, as long as you make a note of that on the map. (2) count up and record the number of localities you have been to/through, divide that number by 133, multiply by 100, and record the percentage of localities you’ve been to in the space provided (all told, you’ve probably been to more of Virginia than you realize – that’s part of the point of this!); (3) write in what you consider your home locality (probably where you graduated high school) in the space provided and indicate it with a darker color or black on the map (if you’re from out-of-state, just leave it blank); (4) check the appropriate box for urban/suburban/small town/rural (be aware that just because your locality has the work “city” in its title doesn’t necessarily mean it’s urban – which means built-up); and (5) use a line pattern to indicate the locality you most want to begin your teaching career in. US map – (1) color the states you’ve been to/through (remember: airports and train travel don’t count), darken/blacken in your home state; (2) write in your birthplace state (for most of you, that probably will be Virginia) in the space provided and blacken/darken it in on the map; (3) tally and record the number of states you’ve been to/through (including the District of Columbia and your home state), divide by 51, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of states you’ve been to and enter that number in the space provided; (4) with a horizontal line pattern for your father and a vertical line pattern for your mother, mark your parents’ birth states on the map (if it’s the same state, you’ll have a crisscrossed pattern) World map – (1) color the countries you’ve been to other than the U.S. (even if you’ve only been to a coastal resort, you’ve been to that country, but again, airport layovers don’t count); (2) tally and record the number of countries other than the U.S. that you’ve been to, divide by 205, multiply by 100, and that’s the percentage of countries other than the US that you’ve visited. Enter that number in the space provided. I’ve provided inset maps for Europe and the Middle East that show more detail if you’ve been to a small country that’s difficult to see. If you’ve been to an island country too small to be seen, list those on the map. You do not need to mark the U.S. on this map. I will tally up the total results and produce maps showing the percentage of students across all three sections who have been to/through particular Virginia localities, U.S. states, and other countries. This will give us an idea of how well-traveled you all are. Value: up to 15 points (12 necessary items, one point each + 3 possible neatness points) Due date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 DO NOT INCLUDE THIS COVER SHEET WHEN YOU HAND THE MAPS IN! 1
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Friday April 9 6:23 PM ET Early risky behaviors predict teen problems NEW YORK, Apr 09 (Reuters Health) -- Sixth-grade students who use alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana are more likely to have emotional and behavioral problems in tenth grade than their peers, according to a survey released by the University of Washington in Seattle. ``One of the most important findings is how early these problems start,'' said Richard Brandon, director of the Human Services Policy Center at the University of Washington, in an interview with Reuters Health. In the 1998 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors, 2 out of every 5 sixth-grade students (aged 11 to 12) had tried alcohol, 1 in 4 had tried cigarettes, and 1 in 14 had tried marijuana. One in 7 had been suspended from school, and 1 in 8 had attacked someone. Of tenth graders surveyed, 4 out of 5 have tried alcohol, while 2 out of 5 drink regularly. One in 4 had been suspended from school, and one-quarter had attacked someone. Within the 30 days preceding the survey, 3 out of 5 tenth graders reported smoking and 1 out of 4 used marijuana. Figures were even higher for the subgroup of tenth graders who reported engaging in risk behaviors before age 12. Of these, 67% had used alcohol in the 30 days prior to the survey and more than 50% reported being drunk at school within the past 12 months. ``Early substance use is a major predictor of the trouble these kids will have in the 10th grade,'' Brandon said. ``Eighty percent of the adolescents between 12 and 17 years old who are regular users of alcohol and drugs have at least one parent who is abusing alcohol or drugs,'' Brandon told Reuters Health. ``The troubled kids said their parents were not involved in their lives and they had no other adult available to reach out to.'' When asked how Washington compares with other states, Brandon said, ``We are very close to the Centers for Disease Control national average of adolescent substance abuse.'' ``Early intervention and prevention are the keys to effecting change,'' Brandon noted, and stressed that such efforts need to begin prior to sixth grade and continue through high school. Yahoo News: http://dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/hl/story.html? s=v/nm/19990409/hl/kids15_1.html
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Nuclear Power Is… Safe Energy Source Mortality Rate (deaths per trillion kWh) Coal – global average 100,000 (41% of global electricity) Coal – China 170,000 (75% of China’s electricity) Coal – U.S. 10,000 (30% of U.S. electricity) Oil – global average 36,000 (33% of global energy, 4% of global electricity) Natural Gas – global avg. Biofuel/Biomass – global avg. 4,000 24,000 (22% of global electricity) (21% of global energy) Solar – global average 440 (<1% of global electricity) Wind – global average 150 (2% of global electricity) Hydro – global average Hydro – U.S. Nuclear – global average Nuclear – U.S. 1,400 5 90 0.1 (16% of global electricity) (6% of U.S. electricity) (10% of global electricity w/ Chernobyl & Fukushima) (20% of U.S. electricity) Sources –World Health Organization; CDC; 1970 – 2011 15
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Why practice ethical leadership? • Ethical leadership models ethical behavior to the organization and the community. • Ethical leadership builds trust. • Ethical leadership brings credibility and respect, both for you and for the organization. • Ethical leadership can lead to collaboration. • Ethical leadership creates a good climate within the organization. • If you have opposition, or are strongly supporting a position, ethical leadership allows you to occupy the moral high ground. • Ethical leadership is simply the right way to go. • Ethical leadership affords self-respect. Copyright © 2014 by The University of Kansas
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UNIX Lab (Room 225) Team Institution Crimson Elwoods I/O, not 1/0 ↑ ↑ almost as good as ↑ ↑ blarg bar grunt qux flarp ~ \ Team 3 Bridgewater College Longwood University Radford University Radford University University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Location DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225 DA225
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PC Lab (Room 114) Team Name Norbert Bridgewater Talon Ramrod Floffy Rainbox Unicorn || barely better than || Dysfunctional programmers :-P :-/ :-D :-) Java.land.NullPointerExecption Team5 The Honorable Mentions WVU Tech – Young Turks University Bluefield State College Bridgewater College Longwood University Longwood University Radford University Radford University University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Virginia Tech West Virginia University
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1-7 Ethical Standards for CostManagement Analysts Cost-management Cost-management analysts analysts must must maintain maintain high high standards standards of of ethical ethical behavior behavior because because they they can can control control the the information information used used for for important important strategic strategic management management decisions. decisions. The The IMA IMA(Institute (Institute of of Management ManagementAccountants) Accountants) Statement Statement of of Ethical Ethical Professional Professional Practice, Practice, published published for for its its management management accountant accountant membership, membership, offers offers guidance guidance for for ethical ethical behavior behavior applicable applicable to to cost-management cost-management analysts. analysts.
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Global health educational resources Refugee health resources HealthReach: multilingual and culturally appropriate health information materials for refugees and health providers. Refugee Health Technical Assistance Center: videos about health insurance & refugee basics (resettlement process and cultural profiles) US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants: multilingual health and nutrition information and healthy living toolkit, domestic violence, etc. Health Information Translations: Health information materials translated into multiple languages for immigrant and refugee families Ethnomed: Seattle based organization on cultural profiles and cross cultural health. Minnesota Department of Health: refugee resources, including a health guide for refugee families Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum: See details in “online modules” section below Online courses, modules & videos Global Pediatric Education Consortium: outline of skills, procedures, and patient care knowledge that can be used to create local training materials worldwide, http://www.globalpediatrics.org/ Global Health Media Project videos (for health workers in resource-poor areas): http://globalhealthmedia.org/videos/ BU edX Global Health MOOCs—The Practitioner’s Guide to Global Health: Three multi-disciplinary online preparation courses that are interactive, case-based, evaluative, enable tracking for program directors, and are free of charge. (PI Gabrielle Jacquet) Part 1: The Big Picture (6-12 months in advance) Part 2: Preparation and On the Ground (1 week-3 months in advance) Part 3: Reflection (upon return) Coursera courses: https://www.coursera.org/course/globalhealthintro Canadian Paediatric Society Global Child Health Curriculum. Four 1-hour online modules: (1) Global Child Mortality; (2) Undernutrition; (3) Fever in the Returned Child Traveler and (4) Children and Youth New to Canada. Available free by request, http://www.cps.ca/en/curriculum University of Minnesota Global Pediatric Education Series (28 peer-reviewed recorded lectures on Global Child Health, associated with quiz questions & CME): http://www.globalhealth.umn.edu/education/online-global-health-course/ Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) modules & resources: http://www.cugh.org/resources/educational-modules Johns Hopkins School of Public Health open source modules: http://ocw.jhsph.edu/index.cfm/go/find.browse#topics/topicID/11/ SickKids Centre for Global Child Health Public Health Nutrition Course: http://learn.sickkidsglobal.ca/ Stanford International Women’s Rights course: http://www.internationalwomenshealth.org/about.html University of Pittsburgh free modules: http://www.pitt.edu/~super1/lecture/lec40331/001.htm Unite for Sight Global Health University USAID Modules: http://www.globalhealthlearning.org/ UW I-TECH Clinical Education modules: http://edgh.uw.edu/series/clinical-education-modules Refugee health module: http://ccirhken.ca/e-learning/?page_id=447 World Bank Group: http://www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/modules/index.html AAP Section of International Child Health (SOICH) International Child Health Competency-Based Objectives (2007): http://www2.aap.org/sections/ich/toolkit.htm
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UNIX Lab (Room 225) Team Institution Location Crimson Bridgewater College DA225 TeamTeamTeamRamrod Longwood University DA225 Chocolate Pandas Longwood University DA225 ↓ ↓ barely better than ↓ ↓ Radford University DA225 Dark Haven Radford University DA225 RuntimeExceptions University of Virginia DA225 ArithmeticExceptions University of Virginia DA225 ClassNotFoundExceptions University of Virginia DA225 NoSuchMethodExceptions University of Virginia DA225 Terrorbyte Virginia Tech DA225 BackPack Virginia Tech DA225 WVU Tech - The Young Turks West Virginia University Institute of Technology DA225
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PC Lab (Room 114) Team Floofy Rainbox Uncorn Gold Sleep Deficit ↓ ↓ barely better than ↓ ↓ The Runtime Exceptionals bletch baz foo thud snork £ \b SyntacticSugar ArrayList Institution Longwood University Bridgewater College Longwood University Radford University Radford University University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Washington and Lee University Washington and Lee University Location DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114 DA114
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UNIX Lab (Room 225) Team Name Bridgewater Crimson Bridgewater Gold Flying Mongooses Death Eaters !(NaN==NaN)! Niner Data Miners :-O :-? :-3 :-( VT Team 4 Team Poland WVU Tech – Old Hands University Bridgewater College Bridgewater College Longwood University Longwood University Radford University University of North Carolina University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia University of Virginia Virginia Tech Virginia Tech West Virginia University
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F: Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities Level of Achievement: 1 Below Expectations Level of Achievement: 2 Meets Expectations Level of Achievement: 3 Exceeds Expectations Is not aware of ethical standards in EECE such as IEEE or ACM guidelines Is aware of professional standards. Knows, respects, and abides by professional standards. Demonstrates ethical behavior Has been caught cheating or plagiarizing. Recognizes when major ethical issues are present. Does not participate in unethical activity. Regularly incorporates ethical considerations into discussions, decision making and behavior. Maintains professional interaction with others Shows little respect for others, is late or absent Participates in team for classes and team efforts, does what is meetings, and makes few required. contributions. Has knowledge of professional standards of ethics Demonstrate s objectivity Has personally biased perspective of problems and issues, is unable to assess things objectively. Is able to listen to other viewpoints and tries to maintain a fair and objective perspective. Shows respect for others, has professional and competent demeanor, contributes significantly to team efforts. Is able to analyze a problem objectively and pro-actively recognize individual/cultural biases in themselves or others.
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GLOBAL HEALTH TRACK COMPONENTS Develop a Global Health Individualized Learning Plan Establish a relationship with a Global Health Faculty Mentor Participate in the Global Health Noon Conference Series (6 per year) Attend the Global Health Grand Rounds Series (annually) st Attend the Global Health Track monthly sessions (1 Wednesday of every month) Scholarly requirement: Lead a Global Health Track Residents As Instructors at Noon Session Prepare for and participate in an elective in a resource-limited setting* (Indian Health Service Corps, low resource local setting, or international) This experience includes completion of a pre-trip curriculum, maintenance of an on-site patient log, and debriefing and upon return. *Note: This is highly recommended but not required for track completion. We recognize that there are circumstances that could preclude participation in a global health elective (such as illness, safety concerns at the elective site, financial restrictions, etc). Per CHW policy, global health electives are only offered to residents who have enrolled in the Global Health Track as interns and are on track to complete Track requirements by graduation Rotate in the CHW HIV and International Adoption Clinics (when available) Community engagement: participate in service learning opportunities, including with partners such as the Pan African Community Association, the International Learning Center, & Journey House Community Center. Educational initiatives: opportunities include assisting with the Pediatric Residency global health curriculum, providing education for Global Health Pathway medical students, and engaging in Train the Trainer initiatives during global health electives National involvement: enroll as a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on International Child Health; become engaged in national advocacy, educational, and other initiatives % Expected participation 100% 100% 100% (in person or by video) 100% (in person or by video) Minimum 50% 100% PL Year 1 (annual reassessment) 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 1, 2, 3 2 or 3 Optional 3 (or 4, for med-peds) Optional 1, 2, 3 (timing will vary) Optional 1, 2, 3 Optional 1, 2, 3 Optional 1, 2, 3
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ELA Common Core State Standards (called Common Core Learning Standards P-12 in NYS) Adopted by the NYS Board of Regents in January 2011 • Reading for Information – 10 standards • Reading Literature – 11 standards • Writing – 11 standards • Speaking and Listening – 6 standards • Language – 6 standards • Foundations of Reading - 4 standards The CCLS include content area literacy: • Reading History/Social Studies – 9 standards • Reading Science – 10 standards • Writing History/Science – 9 standards 4
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Management Information Systems Chapter 15 Managing Global Systems Managing Global Systems Local, Regional, and Global Systems Agency and other coordination costs increase as the firm moves from local option systems toward regional and global systems. However, transaction costs of participating in global markets probably decrease as firms develop global systems. A sensible strategy is to reduce agency costs by developing only a few core global systems that are vital for global operations, leaving other systems in the hands of regional and local units. Source: From Managing Information Technology in Multinational Corporations by Edward M. Roche, © 1993. Adapted by permission of Prentice Hall, Inc., Upper Saddle River, N.J. Figure 15-4 15.10 © 2007 by Prentice Hall
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How do you practice ethical leadership? General guidelines: • Ethical leadership requires a clear and coherent ethical framework on which the leader can draw in making decisions and taking action. • Your ethical framework should agree with the ethical framework, vision, and mission of the organization or initiative. • Ethics should be a topic of discussion. • Ethics should be out in the open. • Ethical thought must be connected to action. • Ethical leadership is a shared process. Copyright © 2014 by The University of Kansas
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II. Ethical Responsibility of Business Professionals  As a business professional you have the responsibility to promote Ethical (what does that mean???) use of IS in the workplace Business Ethics – ethical questions that are part of daily business decision making Ethical Use of Technology – the use of technology raises its own ethical questions Ethical Guidelines – many firms have specific guidelines for ethical computer and Internet use by employees 13-5
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Factors the Determine How You Decide Ethical Issues  Actions in ethical dilemmas determined by    Your basic ethical structure The circumstances of the situation Your basic ethical structure determines what you consider to be    Minor ethical violations Serious ethical violations Very serious ethical violations © McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., McGraw-Hill/Irwin
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