Supervision of Student Interns vs. Registered Interns  This course meets the requirements to become a Qualified Supervisor for social work registered interns. The focus of this training is on the supervision of social work interns who are students in an accredited social work program.  There are differences between the supervision of student interns and the supervision of registered social work clinical interns. Student Interns  Still completing the MSW degree  Requirements are set by Council on Social Work Education (national accrediting body of graduate and undergraduate social work programs)  Students must receive 1 hour of weekly face-to-face supervision with a professional with a degree in Social Work Office of Field Education - Jan. 2014 2
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Practicum and Internship • Information is provided in the Manuals for applying for practicum/internship, practicum/internship site requirements, practicum/internship site supervisor requirements, practicum/internship faculty supervisor requirements, practicum/internship student expectations and requirements, and copies of required forms. • The manuals can be accessed at http://ualr.edu/chpr/graduate-programs/rehabilitation-counseling/practicum-internship/ • Deadlines for practicum and internship applications are as follows: Fall Semester: June 15 Spring Semester: September 15 Summer Semester: March 15
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Confidentiality Resources • Examples of State confidentiality overview documents: - MN: Consent & Confidentiality – Providing Medical and Mental Health Services to Minors in Minnesota: http://www.hcmc.org/cs/groups/public/documents/webcontent/hcmc_p_0 50277.pdf MS: Minor Consent & Confidentiality in Mississippi (on SharePoint) - OR: Minor Rights: Access and Consent to Health Care -A resource for providers, parents and educators (on SharePoint) • Addressing parents who oppose to time alone/confidentiality - Vermont “Understanding Confidentiality” fact sheet (on Sharepoint)
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Outline Explain the scope of the problem of elder abuse and neglect – Distinguish the different types of elder abuse and neglect – Identify the prevalence of elder abuse and neglect and difficulties in establishing it – Identify the impact of elder abuse on both the patient and society Identify common signs and symptoms of elder abuse and neglect – Recognize the risk factors for elder abuse and neglect – Identify what to look for in the patient – Identify what to look for in the caregiver Define the role of the medical professional in elder abuse and neglect situations – Recognize barriers to proper detection and reporting of abuse and neglect by the medical professional. – Review proper reporting procedures for elder abuse and neglect. – Review proper documentation and findings in suspected elder abuse and neglect situations.
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Description of Repository Activities Waived/Limited consent: A. Research data collected under a waiver of consent. B. Research data collected with consent, but no specific provision for future research. C. Research data collected with consent, but with Collection limits on future 1. uses. D. Medical records Data data submitted by investigators not on the repository protocol must meet submittal requirements. Protocol investigators must collect per protocol. Fully consented: Data collected via research interactions of clinical care with specific consent obtained for storage for future research. Research data collected with 2. Repository Maintenance A certificate of confidentiality is recommended and may be required for sensitive information. Adequate data security is required. 3. Specimen/Data Release All data releases require a data release/use agreement. De-identified and anonymized data may be release per repository Fully consented: Waived/Limited consent: protocol no further data may be Identifiable data may with Identifiable IRB action. be released per repository released or used by the Protocol protocol with a waiver of consent and authorization and approval from the recipient’s IRB. Some limits may be applicable due to legal requirements or prior Investigators under a waiver of consent/authorization from: • Recipient’s IRB (which may be OHSU) • and from the OHSU IRB. Some limits may be applicable due to legal requirements or prior consent specifications.
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Spot Adult Offender Warning Signs Shows favoritism Finds reasons to spend time alone with minors Prefers time with minors Gives gifts to minors without permission Engages in too much physical contact with minors Always wants to wrestle/ tickle Treats minors like equals Keeps secrets with minors Ignores policies Uses inappropriate language Tells inappropriate jokes Texts, emails, and uses social media with minors without permission 10
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Respect, Reward, Recognize You, the preceptor, are my partner in the education of dietetic interns. My goal is to have you actively participate in the continuous quality improvement process surrounding the UCA Dietetic Internship (DI). Your input regarding the interns, scheduling, rotations, assignments, etc. is essential to the success of this internship. I RESPECT your expertise and welcome your feedback on a continuous basis, both through informal and formal means. The UCA Dietetic Interns must demonstrate professional attributes including timeliness, organization, RESPECT, a positive attitude, motivation, open-mindedness, flexibility, and patience. Interns must always be RESPECTFUL of your willingness to precept and understand that your full-time commitment and priority to providing patient/client care and/or high-quality food and nutrition services is in addition to precepting. In an effort to REWARD you for your time and to make the precepting of UCA dietetic interns as efficient and seamless as possible, we host a preceptor training and luncheon each spring. Additionally, we strongly recommend that all preceptors complete the on-line CDR Dietetic Preceptor Training Course. Each August at the Dietetic Intern Graduation Reception, preceptors will be RECOGNIZED for their contribution to the UCA DI program. Interns will nominate preceptors in each of three areas: Community, Clinical, and Foodservice. These preceptors will also be nominated for the AND Outstanding Preceptor Award.
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The Protocol Narrative Informed Consent & Assent Procedures Describe how informed consent will be obtained from participants and how assent will be obtained from minors. • Exemption requests: consent form or cover letter recommended but not required • Standard application: consent form or cover letter required, but written consent may be waived under certain circumstances if requested • Research involving minors: consent form is always required; written consent must be obtained from parents. Assent can be obtained verbally or in writing
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What Is Consent? Each person must clearly communicate his/her willingness and permission to engage in sexual activity. • A person who is drunk or high may not be able to consent. • Having sex with a person who is passed out, or slides in and out of consciousness, is rape. • Failure to resist or say “no,” does not equal consent. • Silence does not constitute consent. • Past consent to sexual relations does not constitute consent to subsequent relations. • Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms. • A person’s appearance or dress does not communicate consent. • During an encounter, a person may consent to certain sexual acts and not to others. • A person under 17 years old cannot consent to sexual intercourse under New York law. 58
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3. CAN PROTECT MINORS FROM HARM, BUT CAN’T RESTRICT IDEAS THEY RECEIVE. COMPELLING AND NARROWLY DRAWN. 4. NO CAUSAL LINK BETWEEN PLAYING AND ACTUAL HARM TO MINORS. ALSO VOLUNTARY RATING SYSTEM. MANY FAILED ATTEMPTS TO REGULATE VIOLENCE TO MINORS. ALITO AND ROBERTS (C)– VAGUE THOMAS (D) – NO MINORS RIGHTS IN 1791 BREYER (D) – MINORS CAN STILL PLAY IF PARENTS BUY OR RENT FOR THEM. DON’T WANT MINORS ALONE . PRIVATE LABELS ON LEVELS – VIOLENCE AND SEX
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Practicum and Internship • Clinical training is designed to enable students to apply the information, concepts and skills they have learned in their academic courses. All students must complete the prerequisite courses with a “B” or better before they enter practicum. • All Practicum requirements must be completed prior to beginning the Internship experience. • The policies, procedures and requirement documentation for the Practicum fieldwork and Internship fieldwork experiences are located within the Practicum Manual and Internship Manual, respectively, and both manuals are intended to provide the student with detailed information and procedures for applying for and participating in his/her rehabilitation counseling practicum and internship experience.
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Important Legal Information for Adolescents and Parents According to Iowa law, a minor (an individual younger than 18 years) may seek medical care for the following without the permission or knowledge of his parents: • Substance abuse treatment; • Sexually Transmitted Infection(STI) testing and treatment; • HIV testing – if test is positive, Iowa law requires parent notification; • Contraceptive care and counseling, including emergency contraception; and Even though teenagers young • Blood donation if 17and years of age or adults can receive these treatments older. without their parent’s knowledge, it is important to remember parents are a key part of all aspects of your life. We encourage parents and teens to be open and honest with each other when it comes to health care decisions. It is important for teens to know that if they are covered by their parents’ medical insurance and want it to cover their treatment, they will need to consent to their medical records being shared – possibly even with parents. A minor may also consent for evaluation and treatment in a medical emergency or following a sexual assault. However, treatment information can not be kept confidential from parents. Bill of Rights for Teens and Young Adults • The things you tell us in confidence will be kept private. • We will speak and write respectfully about your teen and family. • We will honor your privacy. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: Emotional Support • Care that respects your teen’s growth and development. • We will consider all of your teen’s interests and needs, not just those related to illness or disability. Respect and Personal Dignity • You are important. We want to get to know you. • We will tell you who we are, and we will call you by your name. We will take time to listen to you. • We will honor your privacy. Care that Supports You and Your Family • All teens are different. We want to learn what is important to you and your family. Information You Can Understand • We will explain things to you. We will speak in ways you can understand. You can ask about what is happening to you and why. Care that Respects Your Need to Grow and Learn • We will consider all your interests and needs, not just those related to your illness or disability. Make Choices and Decisions • Your ideas and feelings about how you want to be cared for are important. • You can tell us how we can help you feel more comfortable. • You can tell us how you want to take part in your care. • You can make choices whenever possible like when and where you YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO: receive your treatments. Bill of Rights for Parents Respect and Personal Dignity • You and your teen will be treated with courtesy and respect. Make Decisions About Your Teen’s Care • We will work in partnership with you and your teen to make decisions about his care. • You can ask for a second opinion from another healthcare provider. Family Responsibilities YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO: Provide Information • You have important information about your teen’s health. We need to know about symptoms, treatments, medicines, and other illnesses. • You should tell us what you want for your child. It is important for you to tell us how you want to take part in your teen’s care. • You should tell us if you don’t understand something about your teen’s care. • If you are not satisfied with your teen’s care, please tell us. Provide Appropriate Care • You and the other members of the health care team work together to plan your teen’s care. • You are responsible for doing the things you agreed to do in this plan
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More About Affirmative Consent  Consent to any sexual act, or prior consensual sexual activity between or with any party, does not necessarily constitute consent to any other sexual act  Consent is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol  Consent may be initially given but withdrawn at any time  Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, which occurs when an individual lacks the ability to knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity   Incapacitation may be caused by the lack of consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if an individual otherwise cannot consent. Depending on the degree of intoxication, someone who is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to consent  Consent cannot be given when it is the result of any coercion, intimidation, force, or threat of harm  When consent is withdrawn or can no longer be given, sexual activity must stop
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Item 8. Informed Consent Cont. • Informed Consent is a PROCESS not a form! – Informed consent form can be viewed as a script that can guide the consent process. – Informed consent process typically culminates in signing of the consent form • Waiver or Alteration of Informed Consent – Used for any alteration of the regular informed consent process. – Special form must be completed and submitted with application – Note that form has two sections: • one pertaining to a waiver/alteration of consent and • one pertaining to a waiver of documentation of consent INSPIRATION for change
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Elements of Informed Consent cont.  Passive consent or “opt out” procedure requires a waiver of informed consent or elements of the informed consent   This is more problematic for internet research Informed consent documents must be “date stamped”  Date stamped consent must be used for all research using consent  If conducting online research and date stamped consent can’t be uploaded, then consent document must include a statement that contains the expiration date of the consent document
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Elements of Informed Consent cont.  Passive consent or “opt out” procedure requires a waiver of informed consent or elements of the informed consent   This is more problematic for internet research Informed consent documents must be “date stamped”  Date stamped consent must be used for all research using consent  If conducting online research and date stamped consent can’t be uploaded, then consent document must include a statement that contains the expiration date of the consent document
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