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Webinar Outlines Webinar L1: Part I (today) • • • • • • Introduction and brief overview of the strengths approach A model and framework for assessment in strengths-based TR/RT practice The ecological approach to strengths-based assessment Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Leisure Domain Tools for assessment of global outcomes of TR/RT services: Well-Being Questions, discussion Webinar L2: Part II (October 8) • • • • • • • Brief overview of the strengths approach and a framework for assessment from Part I Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Psychological/Emotional Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Cognitive Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Social Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Physical Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Spiritual Domain Questions, discussion 3
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Webinar Outlines Webinar L1: Part I (October 1) • • • • • • Introduction and brief overview of the strengths approach A model and framework for assessment in strengths-based TR/RT practice The ecological approach to strengths-based assessment Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Leisure Domain Tools for assessment of global outcomes of TR/RT services: Well-Being Questions, discussion Webinar L2: Part II (today) • • • • • • • Brief overview of the strengths approach and a framework for assessment from Part I Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Psychological/Emotional Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Cognitive Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Social Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Physical Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Spiritual Domain Questions, discussion 3
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III. US Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Stude nt Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y University Supervisor STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED Candidate Evaluation Observation Report # (Circle) HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR 1 Copies: WHITE - University Supervisor YELLOW - Cooperating Teacher B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and p edagogy of thecontent area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. 5 6 PINK – Student Teacher Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments 4 Unsatisfactory DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. 3 Performance Level A Developing DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners 2 A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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VI. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation Forms The University of Tennessee at Martin Final Student Teaching Performance Assessment Evaluation b y Cooperating Teacher STUDENT TEACHER (Last, First, Middle) MAJOR/LICENSURE AREA DATE PREPARED HOST SCHOOL CITY, STATE PRINCIPAL GRADE LEVEL(S)/SUBJECT TAUGHT COOPERATING TEACHER UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR The cooperating teacher should complete this evaluation and ALL COPIES RETURNE D to the DIRECTOR OF FIELD EXPE RIENCES by Monday of the last week of the student teaching experience. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing Performance Level B Proficient Performance Level C Advanced ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N I: Planning Indicators A. Establishes appropriate instructional goals and objectives B. Plans instruction and student evaluation based on an in-depth understanding of the content, student needs, curriculum standards, and the community C. Adapts instructional opportunities for diverse learners Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N II: Teaching Strategies Indicators A. B. Demonstrates a deep understanding of the central concepts, assum ptions, structures, and pedagogy of the content area. Uses research-based classroom strategies that are grounded in higher order thinking, problem-solving, and real world connections for all students. ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N III: Assessment and Evalua tion Indicators Uses appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content and make instructional decisions. B. Communicates student achievement and progress to students, their parents, and appropriate others C. Reflects on teaching practice through careful examination of classroom evaluation and assessments ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced A. Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAIN IV: Learning Environment Indicators A. Creates a classroom culture that develops student intellectual capacity in the content area. B. Manages classroom resources effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced Unsatisfactory Performance Level A Developing ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ DOMAI N V: Professional Growth Indicators A. Collaborates with colleagues and appropriate others B. Engages in high-quality, on-going professional development as defined by the Tennessee State Board of Education Professional Development Policy to strengthen knowledge and skill in the content of the teaching assignment. C. Performs professional responsibilities efficiently and effectively ________ Required Area to Strengthen Performance Performance Level B Level C Proficient Advanced ________ Required Area to Strengthen
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Disclosure Statements This presentation has been prepared by NantHealth, Inc. (the “Company”) for informational purposes only and not for any other purpose. Nothing contained in this presentation is, or should be construed as, a recommendation, promise or representation by the presenter or the Company or any director, employee, agent, or adviser of the Company. This presentation does not purport to be all-inclusive or to contain all of the information you may desire. Information provided in this presentation speaks only as of the date hereof. The Company assumes no obligation to update any information or statement after the date of this presentation as a result of new information, subsequent events or any other circumstances. These materials and related materials and discussions may contain forward-looking statements that are based on the Company’s current expectations, and projections and forecasts about future events and trends that the Company believes may affect its business, financial condition, operating results and growth prospects. Forward-looking statements are subject to substantial risks, uncertainties and other factors, including but not limited to (1) the structural change in the market for healthcare in the United States, including uncertainty in the healthcare regulatory framework and regulatory developments in the United States and foreign countries; (2) the evolving treatment paradigm for cancer, including physicians’ use of molecular information and targeted oncology therapeutics and the market size for molecular information products; (3) physicians’ need for precision medicine products and any perceived advantage of our solutions over those of our competitors, including the ability of our comprehensive platform to help physicians treat their patients’ cancers; (4) our ability to generate revenue from sales of products enabled by our molecular and biometric information platforms to physicians in clinical settings; (5) our ability to increase the commercial success of our sequencing and molecular analysis solution; (6) our plans or ability to obtain reimbursement for our sequencing and molecular analysis solution, including expectations as to our ability or the amount of time it will take to achieve successful reimbursement from third-party payors, such as commercial insurance companies and health maintenance organizations, and government insurance programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid; (7) our ability to effectively manage our growth, including the rate and degree of market acceptance of our solutions; and (8) our ability to offer new and innovative products and services, attract new partners and clients, estimate the size of our target market, and maintain and enhance our reputation and brand recognition. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. No representation or warranty, express or implied, is given as to the completeness or accuracy of the information or opinions contained in this document and neither the Company nor any of its directors, members, officers, employees, agents or advisers accepts any liability for any direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage arising from reliance on such information or opinions. Past performance should not be taken as an indication or guarantee of future performance, and no representation or warranty, express or implied, is made regarding future performance. We own or have rights to trademarks and service marks that we use in connection with the operation of our business. NantHealth, Inc. and our logo as well as other protected brands. Solely for convenience, our trademarks and service marks referred to in this presentation are listed without the (sm) and (TM) symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors to these trademarks, service marks and trade names. Additionally, we do not intend for our use or display of other companies’ trade names, trademarks, or service marks to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, these other companies. We have indicated with (TM) symbols where these third party trademarks are referred to in this presentation. This presentation includes certain financial measures not based on accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or non-GAAP measures. These non-GAAP measures are in addition to, not a substitute for or superior to, measures of financial performance prepared in accordance with GAAP. Confidential Copyright © Do not distribute 6
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ASSESSMENT METHOD Reflects best practices Meets standards Needs development Reviewer comments or suggestions The assessment method describes, in detail: ☒ what the data source is (scores from exams, surveys, presentations, etc.) ☐ how the data will be gathered and by whom ☐ how often/when the data will be gathered ☒ who will evaluate/score it ☐ what the evaluation scale is (%? SD – SA? 0-5? P/F?) ☒ the criteria for acceptable performance (e.g., 85% pass rate, 75% score, 80% agree or strongly agree) ☒ who will review the results and when they will be reviewed   ☐ The assessment isolates useful data* about the target learning outcome from other information.   ☐ The assessment method is practical (i.e., it can be implemented with existing time and resources).   ☐ All information is provided.   ☐ The method includes sufficient detail to easily understand whether the assessment is appropriate for measuring the target learning outcome(s).   ☐ The assessment isolates useful data* about the target learning outcome from other information.   *Useful data means that your scores, responses, results, etc. are at an appropriate level of detail to provide information about just one learning outcome and provide an indication about what the program should retain or change.   ☐ The assessment is practical.           ☐ All information is provided, but some details need clarification.   ☐ The assessment isolates useful data about the target learning outcome from other information.   ☐ The assessment is practical.     ☒ Not all information is provided.  or  ☒ Many details need clarification.  or  ☐ The assessment does not provide useful data about the target learning outcome. (e.g., retention rates (as data) don’t reveal whether students write well (where writing well is the target learning outcome))  or  ☐ The assessment does not isolate data about the target learning outcome from other information. (In most cases, course grades as a data source fall under this category.)  or  ☐ The assessment is not practical.   It’s unclear whether the data will be useful or whether it’s practical to gather. One category of the rubric is used for two outcomes , so it doesn’t completel y isolate data.
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