    Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an Overall Use Case Model (all application Use 1. Cases and Actors). (System Level Graphical Use-Case Model) 2. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case cited in the System Level Use-Case Model. Use template in notes. Develop Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. See examples of ‘reasonable’ student Use Cases examples posted. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your System Level use-case model and all of your individual use-case diagrams (one per use-case). Link the Use Case Specification text (that is, the use-cases) into Rose and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. (More to be discussed: You may need to use Requisite Pro. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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Customizing Individual Toolbars for Modeling Use Cases…2 of 2  Select Browse (Select) Use Case Diagram from icon on Menu Bar –  Tool Bar is made active. Select use case model entities – 1. Select model element from toolbar    – Click to select model element (get crosshairs) Place in diagram window by clicking at desired location Label it (use case) immediately or the use case icon later by replacing the use case name in Name space with the desired name of the use case in Use Case specification window. Click off. OR 2. Right click on Use Case View, New, Use Case   This adds a Use Case in your Browser (hence in your model). Name it right away or, –   23  Double click this in your browser and name the use case via the Name space in the specification window (same process as above). Select and drag the Use Case icon in the Browser onto the diagram window. NB: deleting a model element from the diagram window DOES NOT remove the element from the model! You must go to the Browser to remove the model element. Restrictions are discussed in slides ahead. BE CAREFUL!
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Deliverable #3: New Artifacts  2. Develop Façade Use Case Specification.  Develop an overall Use Case Diagram (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model but icons are a little different.     This is sometimes called the system level use case model. This should be a single page of actors and use cases. Examples of all these can be found in Use Case book and Visual Modeling book. Develop Façade Use Case Specifications and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. (See examples)   Use Requisite Pro and Rational Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Specifications captured in Requisite Pro and onto Rational Rose. Use the Façade Use Cases templates from the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. (See examples of ‘reasonable’ student Use Cases posted on my web page.)
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Deliverable #4 Full Use Cases Model & Activity Diagrams due: 11/14 (Wednesday) – Start of Class   Management Folder: Executive Summary, Team and Individual Logs, Team Num File, SQA Report as usual, and the Statement of Work (SOW) Artifacts Folder:      1. Focused Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) and Requisite Pro* Use Kulak and Guiney book (Use Cases); Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (power point slides for examples.) *CEN 6016 Students only 2. Activity Diagrams: Each Use Case is to be accompanied by an Activity Diagram that indicates flow for all paths in the Use Case 3. Traceability Matrices (forward and backward) features  Use Cases  Revisit Deliverable 3 Folder. Document artifacts changed. Include (name) any changes to Deliverable 3 artifacts in Deliverable 4 Executive Summary. Then, of course, include these changes in Deliverable3Revisited folder.  Your Use Case Diagrams for individual use-cases) will likely be supplemented with Included or Extended Use Cases, as appropriate. Redo your Use Case Model (Overall) for the Application. This is the System Use Case Model. Be certain also to view the new sample SOW link on my web page. This is a good template and contains guidance on the individual logs as well. (Individual logs may be included in a single folder in the Management Folder, if desired). 
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Comments on previous slide  Remember: a use-case realization describes how a particular use case is realized within the Design Model, in terms of collaborating objects.  A use-case realization is one possible realization of a use case.  A use-case realization in the Design Model can be traced to a use case in the Use-Case Model.  A realization relationship is drawn from the use-case realization to the use case it realizes.  A use-case realization can be represented using a set of diagrams (the number and type may vary)  Different organizations may have their own way of doing these things…(and naming them…) OOAD Using the UML - Use-Case Analysis, v 4.2 Copyright  1998-1999 Rational Software, all rights reserved 12
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Comments (1 of 3 – Read on your own)  Remember: a use-case realization describes how a particular use case is realized within the Design Model, in terms of collaborating objects.  A use-case realization is one possible realization of a use case.  A use-case realization in the Design Model can be traced to a use case in the Use-Case Model.  A realization relationship is drawn from the use-case realization to the use case it realizes.  A use-case realization can be represented using a set of diagrams (the number and type may vary)  Different organizations may have their own way of doing these things…(and naming them…) OOAD Using the UML - Use-Case Analysis, v 4.2 Copyright  1998-1999 Rational Software, all rights reserved 10
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      Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an overall Use Case Model (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Description text and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. CEN 6016 students must use Requisite Pro* Model your Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. See examples of ‘reasonable’ student Use Cases examples posted on my web page. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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Generating the session key list Source Address Dest Address Last Session Key Key ID MD5 Hash (Session Key) Next Key ID Session Key List RSA Encrypt Server Private Key Server Key  Server rolls a random 32-bit seed as the initial key ID  Server generates each session key as hash of IP addresses and key ID  Low order 32 bits of the session key become the key ID for the next session key  Server encrypts the last key using RSA and its private key to produce the server key  Server uses the session key list in reverse order and generates a new one when exhausted Mar 22, 2019 14
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The UML Provides Standardized Diagrams State State State State Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Activity Diagrams Activity Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Class Diagrams Class Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Diagrams Use-Case Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Sequence Diagrams Sequence Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Collaboration Diagrams Collaboration Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Models Deployment Deployment Diagrams Diagrams State State State State Object Diagrams Object Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams State State State State State Diagrams State Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Component Component Component Diagrams Component Component Diagrams Component Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams • In building visual models, many different diagrams are needed to represent different views of the system. (different views to different stakeholders). • Use Case Diagrams (ahead) – illustrate user interactions with the application. • Activity Diagrams illustrate the flow of events in a Use Case (all scenarios). • Class diagrams represent logical structure, while Interaction Diagrams illustrate behavior (show how objects collaborate via message passing to provide features (responsibilities) of the objects.. • Other diagrams are used to illustrate other viewpoints necessary in some (but not all) circumstances, such as the State Diagrams, Deployment diagrams, … Unified Software Practices v 5.0-D Copyright  1998 Rational Software, all rights reserved 6
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The UML Provides Standardized Diagrams (Views) Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Activity Diagrams Activity Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams State State State State Class Diagrams Class Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Diagrams Use-Case Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Sequence Diagrams Sequence Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Models Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Collaboration Diagrams Collaboration Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Deployment Deployment Diagrams Diagrams State State State State Object Diagrams Object Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams State State State State State Diagrams State Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Component Component Component Component Diagrams Component Diagrams Component Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams • In building visual models, many different diagrams are needed to represent different views of the system. (different views to different stakeholders). • Use Case Diagrams (ahead) – illustrate user interactions with the application. • Activity Diagrams illustrate the flow of events in a Use Case (all scenarios). • Class diagrams represent logical (static) structure • Interaction Diagrams illustrate behavior (show how objects collaborate via message passing to provide features (responsibilities) of the objects.. Unified Software Practices v 5.0-D Copyright  1998 Rational Software, all rights reserved 19 4
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The UML Provides Standardized Diagrams (Views) Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Activity Diagrams Activity Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams State State State State Class Diagrams Class Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Use-Case Diagrams Use-Case Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Sequence Diagrams Sequence Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Models Scenario Scenario Scenario Scenario Collaboration Diagrams Collaboration Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Deployment Deployment Diagrams Diagrams State State State State Object Diagrams Object Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams State State State State State Diagrams State Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Component Component Component Component Diagrams Component Diagrams Component Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams • In building visual models, many different diagrams are needed to represent different views of the system. (different views to different stakeholders). • Use Case Diagrams (ahead) – illustrate user interactions with the application. • Activity Diagrams illustrate the flow of events in a Use Case (all scenarios). • Class diagrams represent logical structure, while • Interaction Diagrams illustrate behavior (show how objects collaborate via message passing to provide features (responsibilities) of the objects.. • Other diagrams are used to illustrate other viewpoints; e.g. State Diagrams, Unified Software Practices v 5.0-D Copyright  1998 Rational Software, all rights reserved 19 6
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      Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an overall Use Case Model (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Description text and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. CEN 6016 students must use Requisite Pro* Model your Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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      Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an overall Use Case Model (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Description text and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. CEN 6016 students must use Requisite Pro* Model your Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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      Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an overall Use Case Model (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Description text and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. CEN 6016 students must use Requisite Pro* Model your Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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     Guidance on Façade Iteration Develop an overall Use Case Model (all application Use Cases and Actors). Similar to Business Use Case Model. Develop Façade Use Case Descriptions and associated Use Case Diagrams for each Use Case. Use Rose (Use Case View) for your models. Link the Use Case Description text and ensure these descriptions are on the CD you turn in for grading. Model your Façade Use Cases using the Kulak and Guiney book. Again, see power point lectures for required attributes. See examples of ‘reasonable’ student Use Cases examples posted on my web page. Additional information: Visual Modeling book and Rose Basics (see power point lecture slides for examples on including your Use Cases in your Rose Model in the Use Case View.)
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Use Case Realizations  The separation of the use-case realization from the use case is essential as it decouples the use case from its implementation, allowing the design to progress without affecting the baseline requirements captured in the use case.  Typically, for each use case in the use case model, there will be a use case realization in the design model (in logical view ) with a realization relationship to the use case.  Typically there is at least one test case for every use-case realization (scenario-based) Introduction to Rational Rose 2000 v6.5 Copyright © 1999 Rational Software, all rights reserved 7
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Use Case Associations Extend/Include Stereotypes  Stereotyped associations indicate a special kind of association. (good pix – Chap 2, Use Cases, Fig 2.12) – Extending (blunt side) is a special use case that extends the original use case (sharp) • “Extending use case” would not exist without the use case it is extending (the extended use case); • Used for special cases; exceptional behaviors. Inserted behaviors • Arrow points toward the base use case that is being extended… – Include stereotype allows use case designers to avoid duplicating steps across multiple use cases (a reuse strategy). • Arrow extends away from the owning parent use case. • e.g. Authenticate User – Note: controversial; – Many Use Case authors do not like these and include the steps within the use case itself or use some other kind of subflow (later). 18
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Use Case Associations Extend/Include Stereotypes  Stereotyped associations indicate a special kind of association. (good pix – Chap 2, Use Cases, Fig 2.12) – Extending (blunt side) is a special use case that extends the original use case (sharp) • “Extending use case” would not exist without the use case it is extending (the extended use case); • Used for special cases; exceptional behaviors. Inserted behaviors • Arrow points toward the base use case that is being extended… – Include stereotype allows use case designers to avoid duplicating steps across multiple use cases (a reuse strategy). • Arrow extends away from the owning parent use case. • e.g. Authenticate User – Note: controversial; – Many Use Case authors do not like these and include the steps within the use case itself or use some other kind of sub-flow (later). 18
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Use Case Associations  A use case model consists of use cases and use case associations  A use case association is a relationship between use cases  Important types of use case associations: Include, Extends, Generalization  Include  A use case uses another use case (“functional decomposition”)  Extends  A use case extends another use case  Generalization – An abstract use case has different specializations Bernd Bruegge & Allen H. Dutoit Object-Oriented Software Engineering: Using UML, Patterns, and Java 17
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Evolutive Text Mining • • • • • • In literature collections, there would be hundreds of papers on the each area every year. Concepts, problems and technologies are not only evolutive over time in each field, but also involved in interdisciplinary interactions. Taking concepts for example, as time goes by, some concepts dies out, some concepts emerges, some concepts are borrowed from other fields, some merges together and some splits. Some concepts in different fields (collection, community) may have different name but share analogical content and similar evolution path. If we can model the evolution of concepts/problems/technologies in one field, we can understand the evolution of this field well; sometimes even can predict the change of this field.   For an even more ambitious scenario, suppose A, B, C, .. are techniques in field 1, and A¡¯, B¡¯, C¡¯ are their analogical techniques in field 2. Suppose we discover two evolutive paths in field 1 and 2: Field1: A->B -> (+D) ->C-> (+E) ->F; Field2: A¡¯ ->B¡¯ -> (+ D¡¯) -> C¡¯; C and C¡¯ share similar evolutive process in field 1 and 2. Does this indicate that the involving of a technique E¡¯ (which is analogical to E in field1) might bring the next development of C¡¯ in field2? This would be very useful for scientific researchers. Using Comparative Text Mining, we are able to find analogical concepts in different fields, and if we can model the evolution of concepts well, this task becomes possible.   User: Scientists, researchers Data: Scientific literatures, for example, Honeybee data and Flybase data. Functions: Finding analogical concepts over collections; Modeling the evolutive paths in each collection; compare and make predictions with the paths in different collections. Challenge: How to find a good model of concept evolutions. How to use CTM to define analogical concepts.
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Dimension Below Expectations 1 Meets Expectations 2 Above Expectations 3 Collect and organize critical data and information to solve a problem. Response does not use relevant concepts to address question; response does not demonstrate a clear understanding of the relevant concepts; response discusses irrelevant concepts. Limited use of quantitative and qualitative case data to support position.   Response uses relevant concepts to address question; response demonstrates an understanding of the relevant concepts; however, the response is not succinct and directly informed by the concept. Some extraneous concepts summarized and discussed. In-depth use of selective quantitative and qualitative case data to support position. Response is informed directly by relevant concepts; response demonstrates a clear and in-depth understanding of the concepts; no extraneous concepts invoked. Comprehensive and in-depth use of appropriate quantitative and qualitative case data to support position.   Analyze information and follow logical steps to reach an effective decision. Response does not demonstrate an ability to think holistically; does not integrate internal and external factors and strategy; does not take an organizational perspective; considers functional areas in isolation and takes an operational perspective. Response does not arrive at logical conclusions and inferences. Statements are made and not supporting logic is offered. Response demonstrates some ability to think holistically; integrates a few internal and external factors and some connection to strategy and integrate across a couple of functions. Some evidence of taking an organizational perspective. Response arrives at logical conclusions and inferences. Statements are made and some supporting logic is offered. Response demonstrates a clear ability to think holistically; integrate several internal and external factors to strategy and integrate across multiple functions; clear evidence of an organizational perspective with an understanding of operational issues. Response arrives at very logical conclusions and inferences. Position is well argued and tightly presented with supporting logic. Ability to Series of individual paragraphs that are not well connected nor well presented; paragraphs do not have strong lead Individual paragraphs that are reasonably well connected and cogent; reasonably strong lead sentences; Very well organized response with inter-connected paragraphs. Strong lead sentences; craftsmanship and style
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